Purple hull jelly

wcjoynerJuly 31, 2007

I made a batch of purple hull jelly yesterday. The recipe was 2 pkgs of sure-jell, 8 cups of sugar and 8 cups of the juice from boiling the hulls. I put it up in half pint jelly jars, and put a litle smidge that was left over in a bowl in the frig. The cold jelly is just fine, perfect texture, just firm enough. The jars are still very liquid however. Should I wait a longer and see what happens to them? This is my first time making jelly so I am a little nervous!

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dgkritch(Z8 OR)

Give it a few more days at least. Jelly can be weird and take it's own sweet time to jell.
You can always open and cook it more if you need to.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 4:29PM
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jimster(z7a MA)

I take it the jars are not refrigerated. If not, I'm sure they eventually will jell just like the small refrigerated sample.

Jim

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 5:38PM
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whynotmi(5/6)

As a fellow jelly newbie I know exactly how you feel. :) Last week I made some jelly for the first time. It took a couple of days for mine to set up even though the leftover jar (in the fridge) jelled very quickly. And though I *knew* from reading that it can take a while to jell after processing I still posted here for reassurance. My jars are nicely jelled now and I'm sure yours will too.

Cheers

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 8:56PM
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jimster(z7a MA)

The good thing about this is that your jelly will eventually become the right consistency, not too solid.

I remember cases when we had to console members whose jelly was rubbery and we tried to think up uses for it. Aye!

Jim

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 9:23PM
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whynotmi(5/6)

Jim,

I had to laugh reading your post. I've been debating using my banana jam for spackle. The texture is a bit, um, well, let's be kind and call it "firm".

Cheers

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 10:02PM
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kayskats

I seldom do jellies ... so pardon a stupid question, but what is purple hull jelly?

    Bookmark   July 31, 2007 at 10:05PM
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wcjoyner

Purple Hull jelly is made from the hulls of the purple hull pea, it is kinda like a black-eyed pea. The hulls are very deep purple and give the jelly a beautiful color. You don't use the peas, just the hulls after they are shelled.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2007 at 6:32AM
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kayskats

I was trying to imagine what this jelly tastes like ... this is a quote from a recipe on Cooks.com. is it accurate?

Purple hull peas produce grape flavored jelly. White crowder peas produce honey flavored jelly. Lady peas make apple jelly; and by combining the hulls of crowder, purple, whippoorwill and lady peas a plum tasting jelly results

    Bookmark   August 1, 2007 at 12:05PM
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ibstitchin

My chokecherry jelly did the same thing. The small amount set perfectly in the fridge but the pints were runny. We opened a jar and used it on pancakes (DH loves chokecherry syrup) and put the leftover in the fridge. It was jelled perfectly by the next morning which thrilled me but disappointed my dh. LOL!

    Bookmark   August 1, 2007 at 12:44PM
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jimster(z7a MA)

I had never heard of purple hull jelly or even imagined such a thing before reading this thread. It is jelly made from the hull of a bean.

Purple hull peas are one of the Southern peas, aka cow pea, field pea or crowder pea. They are a bean of the genus Vigna, but don't get caught calling them beans around any Southerners. They are always called peas.

There are a great many different cow peas with colorful names such as black eye peas, pink eye purple hulls, zipper creams, brown crowders, whippoorwills, etc. Black eye peas are the only ones likely to be known by a Northerner. Yard long beans also are a Vigna and similar to cow peas.

Common beans are in the genus Phaseolus. What we call peas in the North are called English peas in the South because if you just say 'peas', it means cow peas.

Is everything clear now? LOL

The link below has a couple of pictures relevent to this thread. You will see why purple hull jelly is thought to resemble grape jelly.

Jim

Here is a link that might be useful: Shelling Southern Peas

    Bookmark   August 1, 2007 at 2:23PM
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zeedman Zone 5 Wisconsin

"Purple hull peas produce grape flavored jelly. White crowder peas produce honey flavored jelly. Lady peas make apple jelly; and by combining the hulls of crowder, purple, whippoorwill and lady peas a plum tasting jelly results."

Let me get this straight... the flavor is coming from just the hull only, not from water in which the peas were boiled? Is this a joke? I've got to try this, just because it is too bizarre to ignore. Got a feeling that I'm being suckered, though... OK, go ahead and laugh, you caught another one! ;-)

    Bookmark   August 4, 2007 at 4:01PM
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kayskats

am I missing something here ... peas are very high pH (low acid) so don't you need to add vinegar, lemon juice, or something just as you do when making pepper jelly?

    Bookmark   August 4, 2007 at 4:30PM
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jimster(z7a MA)

Would someone like to step in here and see if kayskats and zeedman are on the same wavelength re "peas"? It's an age old problem and I have momentarily exhausted my ability to deal with it.

So far as pH of pea hulls, I don't know. Is it important for jelly to be acidic or does the high sugar content do the trick?

Jim

    Bookmark   August 4, 2007 at 8:31PM
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kayskats

jim, my copy of the FDA list of pH values doesn't list pea hulls, but it does list peas and it's way high (so are beans, for that matter)
And yes, non-fruit jellies call for acid of one kind or another to prevent botulism.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2007 at 2:04AM
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kayskats

BTW, Zeedman, do a google search for purple hull jelly and you'll find multiple hits. If this is a set up, a lot of folks are in on it. I had never heard of it until I read this thread and got curious and went hunting.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2007 at 2:10AM
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jimster(z7a MA)

Thanks, kayskats. For some reason, I always thought it was the sugar which preserved jams and jellies. Now I realize that isn't so, at least not entirely so.

Jim

    Bookmark   August 5, 2007 at 12:09PM
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kayskats

jim, I thought the same 'til Linda Lou set me straight. My readings on the NCHFP site also indicate that additional acid is also needed to help the jell set when the base ingredient isn't high acid. That may be what's happening with the jelly above.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2007 at 12:21PM
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Kathy547(z8 AR)

For the jelly recipe & other recipes using purplehull peas, go to www.purplehull.com

    Bookmark   August 7, 2007 at 12:07PM
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wcjoyner

Just checked in, the jelly is still not jelled. I have 2 pints in the fridge, the rest is in 1/2 pints in the pantry. Would it be safe to reprocess all of it and add acid this time? How much acid and what type should I use?

    Bookmark   August 9, 2007 at 6:59AM
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wcjoyner

Bump.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2007 at 4:22PM
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kayskats

wcjoyner ... I had hoped someone else would jump in here but they must all be busy canning.
I've made jelly twice in my life, but I did mention once that I had made jelly from the juice drained from pepper hash. Linda Lou cautioned that I needed to add vinegar. We were in the midst of a discussion of how much vinegar was necessary to protect against botulism for my relish which I intrepreted was also the case for the jelly.
I later read that low-acid jellies needed additional acid AND pectin to jell. I also read a post where a canner was advised against increasing the processing time of jars of jelly. The reason was the pectin wouldn't set if processed beyond the original recommended time.
So, in my opinion and if it were my jelly I'd toss it. I'm afraid you couldn't rescue it and I'm also unsure of its safety since it has been sitting in a sealed jar for sometime.
Sorry, I can't give you a more expert answer, but I would rather err on the side of caution. --Kay

    Bookmark   August 9, 2007 at 9:12PM
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kayskats

PS, Linda Lou just confirmed via another thread that low-acid vegetables need added vinegar for two reason...
l. to protect against botulilsm toxin which grows in the absence of oxygen and
2. to help with the jell of low acid food.

    Bookmark   August 10, 2007 at 1:42PM
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ibstitchin

When in doubt you should be able to call your local extension office and ask. Hopefully someone will come in and answer the questions though. I didn't think jellies were in danger from botulism, more of a mold and quality problem but not really a safety problem. I'm in no way and expert though! Good luck!

    Bookmark   August 10, 2007 at 1:45PM
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Kay86

I HAVE BEEN MAKING PURPLE HULL PEA JELLY FOR YEARS, AND ALWAYS ADD 2 TABLESPOONS OF LEMON JUICE TO THE MIX, IT HELP IS FIRM UP
\

    Bookmark   August 13, 2011 at 12:36PM
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