Looking for Blackberry Vanilla Jam recipe - is this one safe?

nadjahs9July 19, 2012

I was planning to make simple blackberry jam now that my little crop is coming in, but I read somewhere about a blackberry vanilla jam, which sounds like a nice twist. I tried using the search function on here, but no useful results came up (a common complaint, from what I understand). I found this one on the internet but am hoping one of you experts can enlighten me as to whether this would be safe. Similarly, if anyone can point me to one that IS safe, it would be much appreciated!

Blackberry Vanilla Jam

6 2/3 cups blackberries puree (after running them through a food mill on fine)

8 1/3 cups sugar

2 Tbsp. Vanilla extract

7 1/2 Tbsp. Ball Classic Pectin

Once the berries have been run through the food mill, put them in a medium sized non-reactive and heat through. Gradually add in the pectin and bring to a rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Then pour in the sugar and vanilla. Return the jam to a boil and cook for 1 minute. Then, remove from the heat and pour jam into hot half pint/pint jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes

Source: http://www.puginthekitchen.com/2011/08/blackberry-vanilla-jam/

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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Sounds good.

Usually safety isn't an issue with jams and such because the fruits are acidic. There are a few exceptions but blackberries isn't one of them. The only thing you really have to worry about is molds and processing will take care of that.

Let us know how it turns out.

Dave

    Bookmark   July 19, 2012 at 5:48PM
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readinglady(z8 OR)

I agree. There are no safety issues.

You will find the additional commercial pectin helpful. Seedless jams present more challenges in terms of the set.

Carol

    Bookmark   July 19, 2012 at 6:41PM
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nadjahs9

Fantastic - thanks for responding! I'm slowly building up my stash but should have enough berries soon so I think I'll give this a shot for something a little different.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2012 at 5:57AM
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cziga(Zone 5 -Toronto)

I love the leeway in jams and safety :) I was so worried last year with all my canning, and trying jams has been a welcome surprise!! I love that you can experiment a little and still be safe.

As a bit of an aside, you mention that there are a couple fruits that are low enough in acidity to pose a potential problems. Blackberries aren't one of them ... but which fruits should we be watching out for?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2012 at 10:15PM
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readinglady(z8 OR)

The ones that come to mind right now are Asian pears, bananas, figs, mangoes and melons.

All of these can be used in preserves but require sufficient additional acid to compensate for their high pH.

Berries of all kinds are high-acid and not a concern; neither are peaches, apricots, pears (except for Asian pears which are a different variety), or apples.

Carol

    Bookmark   July 20, 2012 at 11:12PM
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soonergrandmom

In the Ball Blue Book there is a Bing Cherry Jam recipe that calls for almond liqueur. I am assuming that it is only for taste and could be left out or some almond extract added in it's place. Is that correct, or is the liqueur required?

    Bookmark   July 21, 2012 at 4:24PM
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uaskigyrl(7)

As an aside, you can scrape a vanilla bean into the sugar and let the vanilla sugar, blackberries, and the vanilla pod mascerate in the fridge. when ready to cook, remove the vanilla pod, proceed as normal...

    Bookmark   July 21, 2012 at 7:52PM
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readinglady(z8 OR)

Liqueur is definitely optional. You can try almond extract or a bit of almond oil if you prefer.

I always keep a canister of vanilla sugar on hand. It's a great way to recycle used pods and the sugar can be used in baking or preserving.

Carol

    Bookmark   July 22, 2012 at 4:31AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

As a bit of an aside, you mention that there are a couple fruits that are low enough in acidity to pose a potential problems. Blackberries aren't one of them ... but which fruits should we be watching out for?

In addition to the fruits Carol listed the only other ones I can think of off-hand is windfall apples. They too require additional acid. Then there is any of the pepper jams since peppers are low-acid.

Dave

    Bookmark   July 22, 2012 at 10:31PM
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Doglips(8b/9a)

I just made some blackberry jam. I took it to another level, I added cinnamon as well as vanilla.

It turned out great! You get the three distinct flavors layered during the taste.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2012 at 3:50AM
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