Ball Basil Garlic Tomato sauce recipe

KimHat(7)August 20, 2012

Hi! I am new to canning and I have been looking for a tested marinara sauce recipe that does not have peppers or celery in it. I finally found it on the ball site- their basil/garlic tomato sauce recipe. The only problem is that it only gives the recipe using pints and I wanted to put up quarts! Does anyone know if processing quarts would be ok and what the time would be for processing using a water bath canner? If not does anyone have any suggestions? I really want a recipe using quarts without peppers or celery but that at least has garlic in it- though I do love basil, too. I also wouldn't be opposed to mushrooms. Thanks! Kim

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KimHat(7)

Also, Could I add wine to it? and how much would be ok? And here is the recipe:

Here is a link that might be useful: Basil Garlic Tomato Sauce

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 11:06AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
readinglady(z8 OR)

First you can take any recipe and delete peppers and celery (but don't increase amounts of other items or add other ingredients) so if you see a recipe that is otherwise promising, just leave the offending ingredients out.

Second, you can add wine as it's acid.

Processing quarts cannot be done if the recipe only specifies pints. You can downsize but not upsize jars. There's no way to know what the processing time for quarts would be. The time would need to be greater to assure adequate heat penetration and without testing that can't be determined.

Carol

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 12:38PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KimHat(7)

Thank you very much for the quick reply. Ok- I have another question. From other posts, it looks like any leafy herbs can basically be substituted for one another, as long as you don't go over the total. For instance, if a WB recipe calls for 1/2 cup basil and 1/2 cup parsley, can I just do one cup basil and no parsley, am I understanding that correctly? And if so, does this apply to any fresh herb (cilantro, oregano, etc.) Thanks! Kim

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 2:26PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

It does NOT apply to fresh herbs. Only dried herbs can be adjusted in home canning. Fresh herbs change the pH so when fresh herbs are called for follow the directions or leave them out.

While it is true you can do some substitutions with dried herbs, it needs to be done with care as many will intensify during storage. Basil is noted for developing bitterness for example.

Dave

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 3:32PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
readinglady(z8 OR)

I have made some substitutions in limited amounts, but that is a purely personal decision based on other aspects of the recipe. I can't recommend it for other home canners.

I would never increase the basil in a recipe for the reasons Dave mentioned. Herbs of many kinds change flavors as a consequence of heat processing and storage time. It is far better to reduce herbs than increase them.

When I grow herbs I often chop, add a small amount of water or water-and-lemon, and freeze in an ice cube tray. That way I have fresh herb flavor and can enhance to my taste whatever might seem a little "flat."

The simpler a canned recipe is the greater its versatility.

Carol

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 4:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KimHat(7)

Ok- thank you so much for your answers. I'm sorry I have so many questions but it really can get very confusing. Another question: if a recipe calls for you to remove the seeds and skins of the tomatoes, do you have to for safety reasons? Also, Carol, you said in your first post that I could just leave out the peppers and celery. Can I also leave out carrots and zucchini? And if a recipe calls for a can of tomato paste, can i use my own canned tomato paste, or does it have to be store bought? thank you so much!

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 5:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
readinglady(z8 OR)

I remove tomato skins because they harbor bacteria and they tend to curl up and become these papery little fragments in the sauce, which is something I dislike. Some posters do leave skins on so it's a personal thing.

Seeds and skins also can make a sauce bitter, which is why some recipes call for their removal. I like my sauces better without.

Yes, you could leave out carrots and zucchini, but by that time you have a plain tomato sauce, so you might as well just pick a recipe for that. Red wine can be added, if you like.

Home-made tomato paste should be fine.

Carol

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 7:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

As Carol said removing skins is a safety factor as the skin is the primary source of bacteria and contaminants. But it is your choice to follow that guideline or not.

The tomato paste issue I would disagree just a bit on as I feel the citric acid that is present in commercially canned tomato paste adds an element of safety that your home canned paste won't have. In some recipes that extra acid can be crucial, in other recipes not so crucial. So if you are talking about adding it to a cooking recipe, use your own. But for a canning recipe I would recommend using commercially canned.

But I have to wonder why you would want to make a marinara sauce and leave out all the ingredients that make it marinara - celery, carrots, and all the other vegetables? Just can plain tomato sauce since that is what you are going to end up with anyway by leaving everything out.

Dave

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 10:09PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KimHat(7)

Thanks for the replies Carol and Dave, you are making this a lot clearer to me. And as for canning just plain sauce, I may actually do that, Dave. At one point I was planning on purchasing a pressure canner just to can the marinara sauce, but I don't think I am ready for that expense just for one thing, so I was looking for a recipe that I would like. I really like a sauce with tons of garlic (can't do that in a WB), and tons of mushrooms (also- can't do as much as I would like) and basil and wine. I didnt know the basil would make it bitter, so that probably isnt going to work either. So, I may just be best off doing a plain tomato sauce. I am just going thru the same process that most people go through when they are new to canning and first learning the rules. There just isnt a lot of room for creativity because if you get too creative you give someone (or yourself) botulism. Kind of a downer, but everyone probably experiences it. But I really appreciate all of your wisdom and for helping me to stay safe. Thanks again. Kim

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 10:38PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
readinglady(z8 OR)

AFAIK, much of the commercially canned tomato paste doesn't contain citric acid. Hunt's doesn't. Neither does S&W, to name two common brands.

Cooking down reduces water activity and pH such that citric acid isn't always necessary.

Of course, it wouldn't hurt to add it for comfort's sake since the home-made version isn't standardized the way a commercial product would be.

Carol

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 10:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KimHat(7)

Ok- I think I am going to use the ball recipe for basic tomato sauce which is 45 lbs of tomatoes, with 2 T of lemon juice added to each quart jar. Just to check, can I safely substitute 2 T of any kind of vinegar for the lemon juice as long as it is 6% acidity? and I can always add a little regular wine on top of that if I would like? (I actually would probably add the wine to the tomatoes while cooking)

    Bookmark   August 21, 2012 at 8:36AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
2ajsmama

If you want to add red wine, look at Ellie Topp's Chunky Basil Pasta Sauce (you can omit the onion) - this can be BWBed.

Or you may want to try her Tomato, Mushroom 'N' Wine sauce but that has to be frozen (even without the celery, carrots, and onion).

And no, you can't sub vinegar for lemon juice, just the other way around, since lemon juice is the more acidic of the 2. If you don't like the taste of lemon juice (I don't think you'd like vinegar either), use 1/2 tsp of citric acid per quart instead (per NCHFP).

    Bookmark   August 21, 2012 at 9:09AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

There just isnt a lot of room for creativity because if you get too creative you give someone (or yourself) botulism.

You are correct, there is little "creativity" allowed in canning. Creativity belongs in cooking which is an art. Canning is a science and one of the first points taught in canning classes is you canNOT create your own recipes for canning and be safe.

Just to check, can I safely substitute 2 T of any kind of vinegar for the lemon juice as long as it is 6% acidity? and I can always add a little regular wine on top of that if I would like? (I actually would probably add the wine to the tomatoes while cooking)

No, as mentioned, you can never safely substitute vinegar for lemon juice. Vinegar (5% minimum required) is less acidic than bottled lemon juice and you would need 2x as much vinegar. And it must be bottled lemon juice, not fresh. You can add a little wine but it is better when added just before serving.

Dave

    Bookmark   August 21, 2012 at 9:57AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
What to grind with?
I want to grind up some garlic and some onions to make...
woco
Starting my own recipe
I love to cook, so how do I preserve my own recipes...
newatcanning
Have you made sweet & sour Indian lemon pickles?
I have made north African preserved lemons several...
veeta
Canning Bacon ?
I just watched a video on another forum of someone...
scunningham
Thanks Harvest Forum
I didn't grow up canning and learned relatively late....
gardengalrn6
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™