See if we can ID this one . . .

wrynsmom(5)April 5, 2010

I recieved this as a cutting, last year. The leaves come in as singles, but soon form clusters. Leaves are approx 3-4 inches in length. Any ideas?

Thanks a mil for all your help,

Carolyn

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Jan Sword

Hi Carorlyn, it's hoya pallida. I have a large plant, flowers are very pretty!

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 4:14PM
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wrynsmom(5)

I'm in agreement, Jan! But . . . has the name been decided on? Is it H. pallida or H. verticillata? Don't you just love name changes and such?

Thank you for narrowing the name down for me!!! :) And you, too, Pug!!!

Carolyn

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 4:57PM
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mdahms1979

To me your plant looks like Hoya sp. Bogor which is a species that is still of disputed identification. Some people call this Hoya verticillata others Hoya pallida and even Hoya amoena. There is a whole mess with the names of these species and I am pretty sure that Hoya pallida is synonymous with Hoya verticillata or Hoya acuta so it is technically not a valid name. At the time it was published under Hoya pallida the same plant had already been published under another name so the first name always takes precedence.

I just got a cutting of Hoya sp Bogor, had been admiring it in photos for too long and finally gave in to temptation.

Mike

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 5:48PM
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denise_gw

The leaves do remind me of my pallida, but yours look bigger - can you give us an average size? My pallida looks nothing like my verticillata, but I do understand there can be wide variances within a species, depending on where it grows. My verticillata has largish, shiny leaves that are not terribly succulent. My pallida has small, considerably succulent, matte leaves with somewhat raised veins. Though they could be in the same complex, I would never venture to call them by the same name because they are so VERY different. The experts may disagree - I understand that because they look at a plant on (kind of) a DNA sort of level, whereas I use my eyeballs!

Denise in Omaha

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 6:10PM
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mdahms1979

Denise I think if taxonomists that are working with Hoyas were to do more DNA analysis it would help to straighten out some of the confusion surrounding this group of Hoyas.
These Hoyas must have had a common ancestor but over time and through separation due to the landmasses breaking apart etc they developed into distinct populations that we would visually describe as separate species today. There can be huge variation within a species, different leaf size and shape, flower colour etc and chromosomal differences that can lead to very strong robust plants. Just being from an area of year round rainfall or say the dry side of a mountain ridge can cause fairly significant differences in plant appearance even though the plants come from the same geographical area. All I know is that there will be many name changes to come seeing as Hoyas are relatively new to the scene. Having grown orchids for quite some time I know all about the changes that take place. The genus Bulbophyllum that I am interested in has been broken apart into numerous separate genus by American taxonomists and subsequentially put back together all in the span of less than ten years. Many hobby growers simply choose to ignore some of the name changes because they often just cause confusion.

Mike

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 7:57PM
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wrynsmom(5)

Mike,

I have amoena and acuta, as well. This one doesn't look a whole lot like either one . . . hmmmm

I looked up H. sp bogor

http://www.hoyor.net/en/showspecies.php?id=178

Carolyn

    Bookmark   April 5, 2010 at 9:02PM
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mdahms1979

I have only seen photos of some of those plants and I only have Hoya acuta and Hoya sp Bogor myself. To me Hoya amoena makes me think of a longer more narrow leaf with prominent veins when compared to Hoya verticillata. Do you feel your plant is a match for any of the species when you consider the leaf shape/substance and the veins?
You can make a tag that says Hoya sp. aff. verticillata for the time being.

Mike

Here is a link that might be useful: Hoya pallida and verticillata on PS the Hoyas

    Bookmark   April 6, 2010 at 12:30AM
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wrynsmom(5)

Okay, Mike, I read it . . .and I believe this plant to be H. verticillata or H. sp. Bogor (which are most likely the same plant, from what I just read!). :) So, I will label it: H. aff. verticillata (H. sp. Bogor?)

Thanks for the input, everyone!!!

Carolyn

    Bookmark   April 6, 2010 at 1:13AM
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