Clivia care...when to stop watering?

dirtygardener73(9a)September 18, 2011

Some of you will remember my tale of the 7 year old clivia that has never bloomed. I brought it up here to Gainesville with me, hoping the cooler weather would help it finally bloom. Right now, it's not too happy....too much rain, so I'm going tomorrow for perlite so I can repot it.

When do I stop watering it? I know it has to have a cool, dry winter to bloom. I'll have to bring it indoors at some point, and I don't have a sunny window, but do have a bright sliding glass door I can put it near.

Should I fertilize it one last time before I water? I put slow-release bloom pellets on in May, but haven't fertilized it since.

I'm determined to get this to bloom just once before I finally sell it. I can't really ask for money for something that has never bloomed, can I?

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kayjones(Mo6b)

Mother nature will take care of it for you, if you plant it in the ground.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2011 at 3:38PM
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dirtygardener73(9a)

Kay,
I don't have anywhere to plant it in the ground. I just need to know when to stop watering it, and whether to bring it indoors when it gets below 40 degrees.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2011 at 5:37PM
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kayjones(Mo6b)

No need to bring it indoors - mine stays in the ground year around. Do you have a big pot you can plant it in and put in in a protected spot?

From: Chicagobotanic.org comes this information:

CLIVIA CARE IN FALL AND WINTER

In the fall, the clivia�s schedule is similar to that of a Christmas cactus. Stop fertilizing; water only when the foliage begins to wilt; and place the plant in a porch or other cool room where night temperatures drop below 50 degrees. This six- to eight-week rest period is essential for flower bud formation. A shorter cool period could result in delayed flowering.

Once inside, water very sparingly until flower buds appear nestled between the leaves. This might take two months but will reward you with a spectacular bloom just as winter enters its bleakest stage.

When flowers fade, remove the stalk at its base to prevent seed set. In spring, resume normal watering and feeding.

    Bookmark   September 19, 2011 at 9:43PM
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dirtygardener73(9a)

It's in a big pot already. I found a site that said to fertilize it in September (done) and October, then stop watering and fertilizing, and cover it if it gets below 40. It's on my patio, and I moved it toward the back so it gets no rain. That's pretty much all I can do.

    Bookmark   September 21, 2011 at 3:02PM
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kayjones(Mo6b)

Keep us posted on how it does for you.

    Bookmark   September 21, 2011 at 9:02PM
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