let's talk about pasteurization...

kayskatsOctober 26, 2010

when is pasteurization an acceptable treatment?

I just did the Bread 'n Butter jalapenos (aka Cowboy Candy), using the recipe Carol had doctored. She called for 10 minutes at 180 degrees... real pain to keep it at that temp. But I'm hoping I didn't overcook.

In a current thread, tracydr was doing a small batch of okra. She packed the raw okra in the jar and poured hot brine over it ... I'm not sure if she refrigerated it or if she processed. Would this be an appropriate use for pasteurization. Or would the raw pack need true BWB?

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_06/low_temp_pasteur.html

gives instructions for fermented and pickled foods ... I understand the fermented part, but would 'pickled foods' mean the cukes had to be heated in the brine before packing? Or would 30 minutes at 180-185 be sufficient for raw pack?

I am now looking for other recipes calling for pasteurization, but would appreciate insights from the gurus here.

k

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tracydr(9b)

I put the raw okra in the fridge but will be eating very quickly. There is only one pint of about eight pods. Otherwise, I would have processed as required or fermented, depending on the veggie and my mood.

    Bookmark   October 26, 2010 at 2:22PM
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tracydr(9b)

If I allowed myself, I'd eat the whole jar in one day. But, I promised my mom at least a taste!
The vinegar, btw, is in a 50/50 ratio.

    Bookmark   October 26, 2010 at 2:25PM
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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

It is ONLY safe when the instructions include it for that particular recipe. It is not for just any pickled food.

    Bookmark   October 27, 2010 at 12:25PM
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kayskats

I understand, LindaLou, I picked that up from the link I cited above. I have been going through the various pickle recipes on NCHFP and and the UGa 'so easy' and was surprised to find quite a few of them give pasteurization as an alternative. Guess I missed that before?

But what i'd like to understand is why it is acceptable. I thought at first there was some pre-treatment (heating, fermenting, or maybe salt) but there doesn't seem to be any common thread.

Also, I know that in certain instances (such as bread n'butter you can sub veggies, using the same brine. Would that be acceptable ... say subbing green toms or peppers for the cukes in one of the NCHFP approved pasteurization recipes?

I hope noone objects to me asking why? It's a hold over from my reporter days and at 75 it's hard to give up ... at least it keeps the brain working and hopefully will ward off senility..

kay

    Bookmark   October 27, 2010 at 1:54PM
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calliope(6)

Asking 'why' is good. Rules sometimes don't make a lot of sense if you don't know the rationale behind it and even kids resent the 'because I said so' answers. Knowig the whys and wherefores can help you learn when it's safe to make decisions like that.

    Bookmark   October 27, 2010 at 2:21PM
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kayskats

thanks, Calliope. I can't recall if I ever said 'because" to my daughter, but I know I never said it to my grandkids.

k

    Bookmark   October 27, 2010 at 2:46PM
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