Dried seasoning in canning.Red potatoes

kikistreehouseDecember 27, 2011

I think I asked this before . When canning is it true you can add dried seasoning to your recipe and it wont throu anything off (as long as its not fresh). Does anyone have a recipe for red potatoes with the skins on, and can I add fresh garlic cloves, To the jars when canning . Ive always believed that most of the vitamins are in the skins. Thank you. I usually just follow the "Ball recipe".

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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

There are no approved instructions for canning any potatoes with the skins left on. Peeling is always called for since the peel is the primary source of bacteria and other contaminants.

This is not to say you can't do it - some so - but doing so will be a personal choice you make.

Dried garlic? No problem. Fresh garlic cloves and canning? Problem. Like potatoes, garlic is low-acid and high on the c. botulinum list. You'd have to add acid as with pickled potatoes or increase the processing time. How much? No one knows as it has never been tested. The only approved option is using the Mixed Vegetables processing time of 75-90 mins. and by then the potatoes would be watery mush. Garlic is one of those things best added AFTER opening.

As to adding dried spices/herbs? Yes you can. The only concern is that many will turn very strong during storage and some turn quite bitter. So add them with care if you do and plan to add more if needed AFTER opening the jars.

Hope this helps.

Dave

PS: also keep in mind that the recommendation is to rinse canned potatoes after opening. Doing so will negate much of an seasoning you add when canning os best to add after opening the jars.

    Bookmark   December 27, 2011 at 3:29PM
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calliope(6)

Please explain to me how dried garlic is ok but not fresh. If you put dried garlic into a wet environment, it is just finely macerated reconstituted fresh garlic. I don't understand the rationale.

    Bookmark   December 27, 2011 at 5:39PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

It is the same rationale that allows for most any dehydrated food to store much longer than the same food when fresh - the lack of moisture. It is what allows the use of any dried spices, not just garlic.

Molds, fungi and bacteria including C. botulinum require moisture to survive. Herbs/spices/garlic that have been dehydrated has little or no moisture in it so the bacteria dies.

C. botulinum also requires an anaerobic environment to survive. Inside a fresh garlic clove it has both low O2 AND moisture. But dried garlic has been exposed to both air and heat in the drying process as well as having the moisture removed.

Rehydrating while it is undergoing processing inside the jar means it is esentially 'sterile' garlic that is rehydrating with liquid that has already been boiled and is in the process of being reheated to 240 degrees under pressure.

Dave

    Bookmark   December 27, 2011 at 7:13PM
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Linda_Lou(SW Wa.)

Potatoes need to be peeled due to the botulism spores on the skins. Not even scrubbing will remove the spores.

    Bookmark   December 28, 2011 at 12:53PM
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calliope(6)

"Rehydrating while it is undergoing processing inside the jar means it is esentially 'sterile' garlic that is rehydrating with liquid that has already been boiled and is in the process of being reheated to 240 degrees under pressure."

It might be sterile of any active bacteria, but certainly the drying process doesn't kill the spores. There could theoretically be just as many spores on the dehydrated garlic as the fresh. Of course the spores are destroyed by the pressure process, but they'd also be destroyed by the pressure process on fresh garlic. I suspect the only difference is the smaller surface area means such adequate heat penetration it becomes a non issue.

    Bookmark   December 29, 2011 at 12:57AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

According to microbiologists, lab proven techniques of killing the spores include high levels of oxygen, high acidity, high ratio of dissolved sugar, or very low levels of moisture.

Dehydration creates the low levels of moisture so essentially yes, dehydration creates an environment that will not allow the spores to survive on the dried garlic.

Dave

    Bookmark   December 29, 2011 at 9:59AM
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another_buffalo(6)

Just discovered this harvest forum, and it was just what I was looking for. And here is Dave, sharing his knowledge and experiance. What a blessing. Thanks for being here, Dave.

    Bookmark   May 7, 2012 at 11:53AM
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