Inheritance of Juvenile Period in Cherry Hybrids

keking(z6 TN)January 13, 2011

I found this item and thought it might be of some interest to experimenters. It is particularly useful to know that the length of the juvenile period (time from germination to first flowers) tends to follow the seed parent in crosses between the two sections.

Karl

ISHS Acta Horticulturae 56: Symposium on Juvenility in Woody Perennials

ON THE INHERITANCE OF THE LENGTH OF THE JUVENILE PERIOD IN INTERSPECIFIC PRUNUS HYBRIDS

Author: H. Schmidt

Abstract:

A total of 3 200 interspecific hybrids within and between the 2 cherry sections Eucerasus (E) and Pseudocerasus (P) were screened for their length of juvenile period.

The E x E hybrids were the latest to flower, with P. avium and P. cerasus inheriting a longer juvenile period than P. fruticosa and P. canescens.

The P x P hybrids start to flower one year from seed with a JP50 of 1.55 years for the group. The shortest juvenile period is inherited by P. incisa 31, P. nipponica 17, and P. concinna, the longest by P. x hillieri. The E x P and P x E hybrids show a strong maternal inheritance of the length of the juvenile period. Whereas the course of flowering in the P x E group is nearly identical with the P x P hybrids, the E x P hybrids show a slight acceleration of flowering compared with the E x E group.

Adverse growing conditions in 1969 did not prevent P x P hybrids from flowering after 1 year, but prolonged the juvenile period in the E x E and E x P groups.

Schmidt, H. 1976. ON THE INHERITANCE OF THE LENGTH OF THE JUVENILE PERIOD IN INTERSPECIFIC PRUNUS HYBRIDS. Acta Hort. (ISHS) 56:229-234

http://www.actahort.org/books/56/56_26.htm

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
christie_sw_mo(Z6)

Thanks Keking - That's interesting.

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 4:25PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
keking(z6 TN)

I have tried to find more information on differences in the length of juvenile period (the time from germination to first flower) in reciprocal crosses, but haven't come up with much.

In crosses among the watermelon (Citrullus edulis), fodder melon (C. colocynthoides), and Colocynth (C. colocynthis), the juvenile period is "intermediate" between the parents, but much closer to the seed parent.

In peas, as well, earliness tends to favor the seed parent.

In other cases, the seed parent seems to predominate in regards to hardiness (roses, apples). In other words, it is desirable (if possible) to use the hardier type as seed parent.

There are other reported differences in reciprocal crosses, which I've linked below.

Karl

Here is a link that might be useful: Differences in Reciprocal Crosses

    Bookmark   February 11, 2012 at 8:12AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Daffodils from seed
Hi everybody! It's time to start thinking about pollinating...
daffodilhunter
peachmond
Here is my proprietary peachmond, Elberta peach (pollen...
itheweatherman
Tomatillo hybrids?
I grow tomatillos, usually from the abundant volunteers...
jimster
Lycoris spp. hybridization
Has anyone ever tried crossing Lycoris spp.? I have...
John_U
Store bought pepper cross?
I have this long term plan where I plan to save seeds...
Taneedley
Sponsored Products
Zojirushi Hybrid Water Boiler and Warmer
$230.00 | FRONTGATE
Hybrid 2-Part Fountain
SerenityHealth
Sealy Hybrid Ability Firm Mattress Set
$1,199.99 | zulily
Dionyx Stainless Steel Three-Light Crystal Swarovski Elements Pendant Light, 7W
Bellacor
Hopson Leather U-Chaise Sectional - Brighton Breeze Green
Joybird Furniture
VIG Furniture - H72 - Modern Patio Lounge Set - VGHTDH72
Great Furniture Deal
Kartell | Masters Stool
$490.00 | YLighting
Robert Abbey Ovo Chrome Base Table Lamp
Lamps Plus
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™