Hummingbirds dancing?

ditasSeptember 1, 2013

As I opened our shades early yesterday AM just as the sun was peeking thru the trees, I observed 4 Hummers hovering up & down above 1 of the *cafes* (guarded tightly by 1 Lady Speedster). I made sure (w/ binocs) they were not butterflies as there were not on their usual *air-dog-fight* chasing-speed! I was in awe observing for perhaps just a minute or so. Could they really have been dancing?

There are more than usual of them this year, despite their late arrival. I have 6 Hummingbird cafes around & refilling oftener than usual as well. Of course li'l wasps are helping consume supply!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mehitabel(z6 MO)

My guess would be that the dance you saw wasn't a happy dance, but rather threat displays that were triggered in all four of the birds at once by suddenly finding themselves so close together at a food source.

I seem to remember that a "dance" is an early part of a hummingbird fight, but I would have to check to be sure.

See your other post about gumption for some comments on how ferocious these little things really are.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 11:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ditas

Hi again mehitabel ~ you could be right!!! This is a she Speedy who has staked claim to this particular cafe since her youth a few years back & same Gutsy Gurl who so gently cared for an ill Cassanova (as I posted pictorial anecdote - A sad event ...) It could be like in Westside Story's before the ramble scene! I wish I could have been out there to have heard mayhaps, different sounds from them.
In my post documented in pics, I was corrected as to what could be happening. Am still curious if Ms Speedy's behavious is typical of a lady trying her darnedest to save or ease the sad demise of her mate? I understand that, as well documented, those carefree & dead-beat-dad, Cassanovas are loyal & caring only for at least between consumation to before laying egg/eggs days! after all these polygamists are known to be fastidious, wandering guys grooming themselves for another conquest!!! LOL

FWIW!

    Bookmark   September 3, 2013 at 2:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
JordanWalker

It's so amazing to see a bird that seems to be dancing. I have watched from a youtube about a dancing hummingbird. It said that it's either dancing or more likely, attempting to impress a nearby female. So I guess, the one you saw was trying it's best to be recognized by the female bird. I have also read an article about hummingbirds that they divide themselves by territories. Male hummingbirds will aggressively protect their territories. Each territory is chosen based on the abundance of food, nectar, and water. Many male hummingbirds' territories are about the size of a quarter acre. Females will define their territories by the nests they build. Both male and female hummingbirds fiercely protect these areas.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 4:09AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
JordanWalker

It's so amazing to see a bird that seems to be dancing. I have watched from a youtube about a dancing hummingbird. It said that it's either dancing or more likely, attempting to impress a nearby female. So I guess, the one you saw was trying it's best to be recognized by the female bird. I have also read an article about hummingbirds that they divide themselves by territories. Male hummingbirds will aggressively protect their territories. Each territory is chosen based on the abundance of food, nectar, and water. Many male hummingbirds' territories are about the size of a quarter acre. Females will define their territories by the nests they build. Both male and female hummingbirds fiercely protect these areas.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 4:31AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gyr_falcon(Sunset 23 USDA 9)

Amazing what can be learned by simple observation. Our current plot is under .25 acres. I counted 14 individual hummingbirds (Allens, Annas and migrating Rufous) during one recording weekend period. I marked out those with territories and noted who where the trespassers. One tough Allens claimed and defended just a single Leonotis menthifolia shrub.

There were style patterns in nectar thefts; one smart juv. allens would hide inside a nearby shrub, waiting for the top bird to chase off wanna-be top bird. Then he would feed on his choice of flowers, but usually the lower or back ones. When top bird would return, he was often searching the outskirts for #2's return, and often would not notice the bandit feeding under his nose. Bandit didn't defend any territory, nor chase other trespassers--he would just try to be a bit more hidden them, so top bird would see and chase the other trespasser instead of him. I think that savvy bandit ate better than any other hummer in the garden! lol

    Bookmark   September 24, 2013 at 1:52PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Hello from Florida
Hello all, I have recently added a butterfly garden...
angelimperfect36
Cleaning feeders
I have a question about how to clean mold out of the...
Jenn.B
Petunia Species integrifolia & exserta & Hummers?
I was reading an academic journal about original Petunia...
ladyrose65
Pentas
Do Pentas attract hummingbirds? Im thinking about adding...
arkpollinator
Material for hummingbird nest
I saw this product/video online and I'm wondering what...
PFCMCL
Sponsored Products
Elk Lighting 4H Dish - 93-3046
$22.00 | Hayneedle
Hummingbird Curtain Valance 54 x 16 Inch
$34.95 | Bellacor
Berkeley Antique Copper Clock Hummingbird Medallion
$678.50 | Bellacor
Furniture of America Calliope Natural Oak Garden Bench
Overstock.com
128-Oz. Hummingbird Nectar Powder
$10.99 | zulily
Handmade Hummingbird Weathervane
Overstock.com
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™