annabelle

pearlgirlJune 19, 2009

My annabelles are soooo much more than I KNEW to expect

this year, until I'm almost happily speechless! My question

is...has anyone ever tried to propagate this hydrangea? I

have a few of the cuttings in water to see what happens and three more coming from Hydrangea Plus today. I

would very much like to try rooting some on my own. Any

advice is appreciated.

Margaret

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ladywindsurfer(Z7 SE)

They are one of the Hydrangeas that is easy to propagate from cuttings.
You can take cuttings now or wait until the blooms fade.
Makes little difference.
Select branches that are new or this years growth.
Cut the branch so that you will have at least one leaf node in addition to the terminal leaves.
Snip the leaves from the bottom node and leave the terminal ones. If the terminal ones are large, remove about half of them by cutting them crosswise. This will reduce moisture dissipation.
Insert the cuttings into a pot filled with a prepared mix. that has been premoistened. Make sure the bottom leaf node is several inches below the soil surface to prevent drying.

You can use almost any type of prepared mix, even potting soil directly from a bag, compost, ground composted pine bark, loamy garden soil, as long as the mixture drains well.
Very important! Soggy soil will cause the cuttings and any root development to decay.

For rooting Hydrangeas, I use a mixture of sand, milled sphagnum peat moss, composted ground bark and perlite. Approximately equal amounts of each. But I have rooted Annabelles in ground composted pine bark alone.

Some people use a clear plastic bag to tent the pot, for moisture retention. I never do, as I have many and it's easy to add water as necessary, when making my rounds in the garden.

If you use the plastic bag, insert 4 sticks in the perimeter of the pot, tall enough to prevent the plastic from contacting the cuttings. Permits air circulation all around the cuttings.

Check for moisture in the rooting medium, at least once per week. You can do this by inserting a forefinger 2-3 inches into the pot. If it feels dry, add enough water to completely moisten it.

Roots should begin to form within 6-8 weeks. Check by tugging gently on each cutting. If there is resistance, then roots have begun to form. Don't be in a hurry to remove them from the potting mix. I usually allow mine to overwinter outdoors and remove them for planting in the spring. At that time, each cutting should have a healthy, substantial root system. I carefully dump the entire pot and then tease the roots apart.

Place the potted cuttings in a full shade location and protect from excessive wind exposure.

Hope this isn't too long winded! I get carried away when talking about plant propagation, one of my favorite gardening exercises!

    Bookmark   June 20, 2009 at 1:28AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ditas

Hi Pearlgirl - Here's a link for fail proof methods with photos that might be helpful.

I'm trying 2 methods on Nikko cuttings as well as ground layering - both look promising with new leaf growths! Â;)

Good luck!

Here is a link that might be useful: Hydrangea ???

    Bookmark   June 20, 2009 at 3:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pearlgirl

Thank you both...
Windsurfer...I NEEDED ALL of those details :):)
Ditas....I've checked out that site....Thanks!
Margaret

    Bookmark   June 20, 2009 at 5:29PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
DEEP blue
When I was growing up my grandmother had big vigorous...
nonconformist_nymphette
I assume all is lost. ?
Deer have decimated almost all of my hydrangeas - probably...
luckyladyslipper
So Cal Hydrangeas growth is stunt
Hi, I live about 3 miles from the beach in Southern...
nikole220
Nikko Blue size
I planted a tiny bare root stick of a Nikko Blue Last...
NVL4
Zinfin Doll hydrangea
Hi, This is a new hydrangea or at least new to me....
Brooks23
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™