two nute tanks

wee_infoNovember 8, 2006

In reading about nutes for Florida Tomatoes, it seems they commonly use two nute tanks, which they proportion, into the stream at 1:100. Is calcium nitrate usually held in a separate tank (Stock B they call it) because there is so much of it that mixing a stock of the other nutes would have to occur too often if it were included in the 30 gallon tank (Stock A they call it) -- like do two tanks simply amount to a reservoir of 60 gallons which is preferable to batching 30 gallons of nutrients, or is there some chemistry which makes it reasonable to keep the calcium nitrate in a separate tank. This is also posted on "Growing Under Lights" - a mistake - sorry about that.

Here is a link that might be useful: Nutrient Solution Formulation for Hydroponic (...) Tomatoes in Florida

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wee_info

This explains why there is a seperate stock tank for the Calcium Nitrate concentrates.

This is from the "Tomato Handbook", MS State Extension Service. Use the link provided and note the link to the PDF version after the HTML document opens.

Go to page 11 of the PDF document
http://msucares.com/pubs/publications/p1828.pdf

The first and second paragrapsh under heading "Injectors" is interesting, but the third paragraph specifically addresses the question about "two nute tanks".

"Concentrate is held in small containers (e.g., 10 to 50 gallons). Two heads and two concentrate tanks (at a minimum) are needed: one for the calcium nitrate (tank B) and the other for all other nutrients (tank A). This is necessary so calcium does not combine chemically with phosphates or sulfates when the elements are in high concentration, especially under a high pH. The resulting compounds, calcium hydrogen phosphate or calcium sulfate, are hard precipitates and can clog the injector and irrigation system. However, once these elements are diluted, there is no problem. If the pH is higher than 5.8, it is advisable to use a third head to inject acid. This is needed to keep the pH in the 5.6 - 5.8 range (see pH section above)."

Here is a link that might be useful: Greenhouse Tomato Handbook

    Bookmark   November 13, 2006 at 10:49PM
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