'Easy to grow' Federally Endangered Species?

nankeen(z8b Portland OR)July 26, 2006

Hi All,

I just realized I've never grown a Federally Threatened or Endangered Species despite my attraction to the rare, so I ordered two. Actually, it happened the other way around. So, who has experience growing native T/E species and who can say which are sustainable for the Intermediate/Advanced grower? I, of course, only want to hear about those plants legally bought and legally propagated from legal seed.

Legal.

I looked at the list for Oregon and most of the 14 look very difficult to grow (Duh!), mostly because of their tiny stature.

Best,

Ross

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razorback33(z7)

Pitcher plants, Sarracenia oreophylla and S. rubra, ssp. alabamensis(Cooks),(FE), Helonias bullata(Siskiyou RPN), (FT). Have long standing order pending for Spigelia gentianoides, var. alabamensis.(Local Private source, seed grown) (FE).
Unless you can find a local source, not many ES are available, legally, from out of state, because of the necessity of obtaining a FWS permit for shipment. The FWS does not grant many permits. In the words of one legal propagator, who finally gave up after many applications, "They" will find a thousand different reasons for denial!
Rb

    Bookmark   July 26, 2006 at 2:22PM
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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

"Pitcher plants, Sarracenia oreophylla and S. rubra, ssp. alabamensis"

RB, I have a funny feeling those are the two Ross just got. ;o)

    Bookmark   July 26, 2006 at 3:41PM
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nankeen(z8b Portland OR)

Hi RB,
Thanks for the input. I know it's hard to get seed/plants, especially across state borders. Despite their good intentions, CITES sure makes it hard to propagate plants that need to be prop'd.

Ken: You're way off. The two I'm getting are S oreophila and rubra ssp jonesii! :-)

Best,
Ross

    Bookmark   July 26, 2006 at 7:00PM
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jim_6b(TN)

Echinacea tennesseensis is very easy to grow.
Jim

    Bookmark   July 27, 2006 at 7:52AM
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Judy_B_ON(Ontario 5B)

Many rare plants are easy to grow. They are more likely to be threatened by habitat loss or competition from invasive alien species than from reproductive issues.

Success growing any plant, rare or not, rests on providing the soil, sun, temperature and moisture conditions that the plant needs. Post names of the plants you want to grow and people may be able to advise of the growing conditions that they need. You can then decide if your garden is a suitable spot for that plant.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2006 at 1:25PM
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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

I vote for Ross to propagate Gentner's Fritillary since he's in Oregon.

I have no idea how to grow it but I understand they are quite popular/desirable in Europe.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2006 at 3:08PM
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nankeen(z8b Portland OR)

Ken, I did like that one! Anyone know a source here in OR? I didn't see one on a quick google.

I also liked Thelypodium howellii var spectabilis... at least partly because of it's name :-)

http://www.centerforplantconservation.org/ASP/CPC_ViewProfile.asp?CPCNum=4275

Best,
Ross

    Bookmark   July 27, 2006 at 6:21PM
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tiarella(7b)

I find that finding rare native plants is most easily done through local native plant societies. Second would be local native plant growers. Third would be through plant exchanges and get togethers. This last one is really fun and you can't imagine going and just spending the afternoon talking dirt with others of like mind! What do I have? Well once I had a yellow orchid purchased from the New England Native Plant Society a goldenseal and 3 spigelias.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2006 at 4:19PM
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ahughes798(z5 IL)

I find E. Tennesseensis easy to grow...but difficult to keep alive in my area. It seems to require alkaline soil, I have the opposite. Since I have a bunch of them I winter-sowed...I guess I'll amend the soil in the area I planted them in.

I grow some locally endangered plants..lobelia cardinalis, round-headed bush clover, Kitten Tails(Bessenya Bulii).

I also have Sarracenia Oreophila and Sarracenia Rubra Gulfensis. They are not native to my area, but I feel that the more people that have them, the less likely they are to be poached from their native habitat, or to go extinct.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2006 at 11:42PM
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philmont_709n2(z6 Ohio)

American Chestnut should be capable of growing in oregon because the blight is absent there. but you would need to get seed from the area. there is a quarenteen for chestnuts to be brought into the west. it could take a few years till you get chestnuts but they grow very fast and are very much wanted. you could probibly sell about 20 nuts for over $30 on ebay. and the tree would probibly produce hundreds of them every year.

    Bookmark   August 3, 2006 at 4:31PM
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nankeen(z8b Portland OR)

The reason I want to grow these is just because I'm a conservation nut. That's why I'm looking for through and through Endangered plants.

Spigelia gentianoides is the only native endangered Spigelia, and is very pretty! I'll look for that one.

No US yellow orchid is endangered, that I know of. Goldenseal and American Chestnut are not endangered. Good hint about the chestnuts though :-)

Sarracenia rubra gulfensis is not endangered, but rubra alabamense is. Apparently, I heard that the gvmt (I think?) is TC'ing alabamense en mass, so this one Sarr should be ok!

I've always liked the Whorled pogonia's. Maybe some day, someone will gift me some Isotria medeloides seed...

I am currently bugging the WA Native Plant Society on an unrelated matter. Maybe I'll bug them about this next.

Best,
Ross

Here is a link that might be useful: Fed E/T Sp

    Bookmark   August 4, 2006 at 11:41AM
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jim_6b(TN)

Hi Ross,
If you are interested in some Echinacea tennesseensis I will have plenty of seed to share in about three or four more weeks. Legally.
Jim

    Bookmark   August 4, 2006 at 10:41PM
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nankeen(z8b Portland OR)

Hi Jim,
If your offer is still valid, I'd like to accept. Just email me when they are ready and I'll send a SASE.

Best,
Ross

    Bookmark   August 25, 2006 at 3:44PM
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jim_6b(TN)

My offer is still valid. I will contact you when they are ready. If there is anyone else interested in some Echinacea tennesseensis seed, please send me an email or watch the Seed Exchange. I will be posting SASBE offers in a few more weeks.
Jim

    Bookmark   August 25, 2006 at 10:31PM
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philmont_709n2(z6 Ohio)

jim i would love some Echinacea tennesseensis seed. i sent you an e-mail.

    Bookmark   August 28, 2006 at 2:51PM
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carex(USDA zone 8a)

Ditto for me. I sent one too. Hope its not too late.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2006 at 12:52PM
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lrobins(z5 CO)

I've read that Echinacea tennesseensis hybridizes readily with Echinacea purpurea, which is popular and commonly planted, even outside its true native range (such as here on the east coast). That means the bees and butterflies will cross your E. tennesseensis with the more widespread E. purpurea and you won't be able to establish a true-breeding E. tennesseensis population. That isn't necessarily a reason to avoid planting, but the only way to maintain E. tennesseensis as a viable species is to preserve the plant in its very limited wild habitat.

Three counties in Tennessee and nowhere else:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Tennessee&statefips=47&symbol=ECTE3

    Bookmark   September 10, 2006 at 2:01PM
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jim_6b(TN)

I understand that they will cross easily with other coneflowers. I live far enough away from other people that I don't worry to much about mine crossing with someone elses. I suppose it could happen.
Jim

    Bookmark   September 11, 2006 at 10:23PM
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glen_cdn_prairies_z3(3a/2b)

Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis) has been designated as a species at risk by the Canadian government.

I ordered seed for it from the US a few years ago and now am pulling it out by the dozen from my garden - a real nuisance self seeder. In my case, I wish this endangered plant was a little harder to grow.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2006 at 12:59PM
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yarthkin(6-7a)

White Fringeless orchid is an endangered candidate and it is really easy to grow. Also, Cumberland rosemary is another FANTASTIC native that smells just like the european, has lovely flowers and is incredibly easy. I keep hoping for someone to propagate Arethusa, but no one seems to be up to the challenge. I've seen tissue culture protocols for it...

Also, the comments about CITES and other endangered species laws are unfortunately very true. I'm all for protecting endangered species; however, it is the too often those trying to responsibly propagate who are punished while people walk out of NC with hundreds of thousands of Venus Flytrap with nary a slap on the wrist. Also, apparently it is totally legal for a coal company to remove an entire mountain range, rare plants included, but illegal for me to collect seed or take cuttings of the plants (and leave the mountain intact).

The most outrageous thing is that at least one English nursury I know has done a better job propagating some of our American native orchids than we have here. Unfortunately, according to the blanket CITES listing of all orchids it is illegal for them to ship them BACK to their country of origen. Insanity.

I increasingly think the Endangered Species Act was a mistake and that what we really needed was the endangered HABITAT act. As it stands we will "save" many rare species but have no place left for them to actually live.

    Bookmark   September 27, 2006 at 2:30PM
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razorback33(z7)

Ross
Are you interested in a very pretty, low growing Rhododendron chapmanii?(FE) Rated as a wetland species (FACW+), but does well on a clay slope in my rear garden.
Rb

Here is a link that might be useful: Rhododendron chapmanii

    Bookmark   October 1, 2006 at 2:07AM
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