Winterizing flowerbeds

Sarah(6a PA)November 22, 2005

I am fairly new to gardening and I was wondering if anyone could tell me what I need to do to correctly winterize my flower beds so that the perinnials survive Indiana winters. I have "Becky" Shasta Daisy plants and was wondering what to do with them. Do I need to trim them back and if so, how far? Also, do they need to be mulched, and if so, how?

Thanks so much!

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username_5(banned for no reason)

Hi, there really isn't anything to winterizing other than to provide some insulation for those plants which are only marginally hardy in your winters. The insulation is typically provided with a few inches of any organic mulch such as grass clippings, shredded leaves, shredded wood mulch etc.

For your Shasta Daisies you really don't need to do anything. I have many of them myself and I don't protect them at all and they do just fine.

You do not need to trim back any perennials nor do you need to remove dead annuals from your beds. You *can* if you want a neat, manicured appearance, but it isn't necessary for plant health and leaving the plants to simply rot their dead selves into the soil puts back some of the nutrients they used while they grew.

I think if you just leave your plants as they are and let nature do with them as it wills you will be surprised at the winter interest many can add.

    Bookmark   November 22, 2005 at 1:24PM
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creatrix(z7 VA)

Shasta daisies keep evergreen leaves near the ground. If you want, you can cut the old flowering stalks close to the ground, just leave the leaves coming up from the ground. (I am one of those who cuts back most of the perennials.)

    Bookmark   November 23, 2005 at 8:21PM
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donsterfun_hotmail_com

Hi there,
Can i prune my wild rose bush in the fall, it looks terrible. Also, should I fertilize or anything to help it through the winter.

thanks
donna

    Bookmark   October 9, 2006 at 11:07AM
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meldy_nva(z6b VA)

Donna, You should post your question separately from this posting (scroll all the way to the bottom of the page when you first enter the New Gardener forum].

Also, we need to know what planting zone you are in, since protection for overwintering roses differs greatly from little in zone 8 to fairly involved in zone 4. If the 'wild' rose has been doing well for several years, then likely you don't need to do anything differently from last year.

Fertilizing is always best done in the early spring since it encourages plant growth. In the fall, you want the plants to be settling down for the winter, not making new growth.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2006 at 6:53AM
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BRTLVR_HOTMAIL_COM

ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR BROWN EYED SUSANS?? I'M TOTALLY NEW TO GARDENING AND CANT FIND ANY INFO ON WINTERIZING THEM. IM TOLD THERE PERENNIALS BUT DONT KNOW IF THEY DIE OFF DURING THE WINTER OR IF THEY STAY GREEN. HELP!! I JUST BOUGHT THEM AND WE'VE JUST HAD OUR FIRST FROST!!

    Bookmark   November 1, 2006 at 6:30PM
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