Unusual Natives: Skunk Goldenrod

jimbobfeeny(5a IN)October 21, 2012

Native to the high Southern Appalachian Mountains, this goldenrod (Solidago glomerata) forms a luxurious carpet of thick, glossy leaves under spruce and fir. It has a most unique smell, a blend of musk, lemon, and spice. I have grown this successfully in Central Indiana; it has not bloomed yet. I'll try to post a few pictures!

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ncrescue

Am waiting for the photos. I have at least five different Solidagos at the mt., but except for S. bicolor, I really am not sure what they are. However, they are very different from the ones in the Piedmont.

Post those photos, please!

    Bookmark   October 23, 2012 at 7:27PM
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esh_ga

Yep, I was waiting for the photos too!

    Bookmark   October 24, 2012 at 8:07AM
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jimbobfeeny(5a IN)

Sorry about the wait! I couldn't get photos to upload.

Here's the plants I'm growing. They are in a raised bed filled with sand and about 1 foot of loose, acidic soil.

This is a patch in the wild; Plants are fairly short, with upright flowers (not like most goldenrods)

    Bookmark   October 24, 2012 at 9:13AM
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ncrescue

They look happy, in spite of the dodder vine trying to choke them. I am not sure if I have those in the mt. or not..altitude is right...5,000'...will check out some possible locations next season.

Thanks for posting.

    Bookmark   October 24, 2012 at 10:12PM
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ncrescue

Ther are quite a few rare or threatened Solidagos in NC, but his one is not in the list, although it is listed as only in NC and TN.

I didn't realize how many different Solidagos existed until I checked the website I am including. Wow!

Here is a link that might be useful: Solidagos of North America

    Bookmark   October 25, 2012 at 10:38AM
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jimbobfeeny(5a IN)

They seem to grow best in openings - ridgetops, landslides, south slopes. I've only seen them above 4,500 feet or so. Mostly in Red spruce - Fraser fir forests.

    Bookmark   October 25, 2012 at 6:03PM
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esh_ga

Yes, I saw them in August climbing up to Mt. LeConte in TN. Big flowers, big plants.

    Bookmark   October 25, 2012 at 9:58PM
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