ID: aster maybe?

danmc91November 27, 2006

Hello,

I came across this flower (lots of them in fact) in the woods near here (Bartow county, GA -- north of atlanta). I haven't been able to find an exact match in my flower book but it seems to be an aster of some sort. Can anyone confirm that?

The picture was taken in late october.

Thanks

-Dan

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nywoodsman

Aster cordifolius? Common Blue Wood Aster.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2006 at 10:49PM
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gw:georgia-rose

To me, looks like White Wood Aster, Aster divaricatus, renamed Eurybia divaricata. They are found in woodlands in most of the N GA mountainous areas.
RB

    Bookmark   November 27, 2006 at 11:12PM
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danmc91

I'm not sure that the leaves on this match some of the photos I found online for Eurybia divaricata. For example,
this photo seems to have much wider leaves.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2006 at 11:40PM
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nywoodsman

The photo looks as if there a light blue cast to the petals.Its hard to tell in the pictures. I took photos of aster cordifolius once and the petals appeared white when they really were light blue.Aster cordifolius blooms later than A. divaricatus.There are many similar aster like species with differing races and really not enough information in the photo to accurately distinguish this one from the others.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2006 at 11:49PM
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danmc91

thanks for the help. Is it safe to say that the flower is some sort of aster though? In the future, do I mostly need better pictures of the leaves too or are there other pictures I should be sure to take to help get an accurate id? Lately I've been trying to identify more of the plants I see in the woods.

-Dan

    Bookmark   November 28, 2006 at 9:44AM
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esh_ga

How about Boltonia asteroides?

Here is a link that might be useful: Boltonia asteroides

    Bookmark   November 28, 2006 at 10:40AM
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joepyeweed(5b IL)

There are so many different kinds of aster's that I gave up trying to distinguish them apart a few years ago...

Aster species, yup thats one...

Of course, we have the decurrent false aster that grows in my region and I have seen it and said - yup - its an aster.

    Bookmark   November 29, 2006 at 10:36AM
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janet_e(6B PA)

There are a lot of asters with little white flowers (or little pale blue-purple flowers), and they are notoriously difficult to tell apart. Your picture is nice and clear, but a single picture is unlikely to capture everything needed for identification of this difficult group.

Having said that... Your plant is not Aster divaricatus or cordifolius, because on both of those species, upper stem leaves are small but fairly broad, unlike the little needle-like leaves in the photograph. It looks to me like Aster dumosus (because of the hint of purple in the flowers, and because of those little needle-like leaves) or maybe Aster pilosus (because of the urn-shaped flowerheads). But my experience with asters is in the northeast, and I'm sure Georgia has other species I'm not familiar with.

I do think you are safe calling it an aster. Even if it's Boltonia, I think "aster" is an acceptable common name.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2006 at 10:03PM
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razorback33(z7)

"Asters", Symphyotrichum dumosum and pilosum, as well as S. cordifolium, S. concolor, S. puniceum, S. undulatum and Eurybia divaricata have been documented in Bartow Co. There may be others, as some specie's records are incomplete. Also, other species are found in adjacent counties and undocumented migration may have occurred. It is often difficult to precisely identify a species, when the flower is the only key available. Sometimes, even the Latin diagnosis, when describing a Herbarium specimen (which is pressed), doesn't help.
I agree that it's a member of the Asteraceae Family and if you like them, call them Asters(as I do) and enjoy the showy flowers! I have only one species, Symphyotrichum georgianum, and it's a handful, to keep under control.
Rb

    Bookmark   December 5, 2006 at 1:47AM
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ahughes798(z5 IL)

It's definitely not Boltonia Asteroides.

    Bookmark   December 8, 2006 at 4:21PM
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