Tasmanian pepper

winsorw(8)March 4, 2013

Hello,

I saw a tasmanian pepper in the nursery section of a local hardware store and it looks interesting. How does it do around here in the south sound area?

Thanks.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Presumbly you are asking about Tasmannia (Drimys) lanceolata. Can be hurt by colder winters, try it in a sheltered position.

    Bookmark   March 4, 2013 at 11:29PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
winsorw(8)

I think so bboy, perhaps I should grow it in a pot. Thanks.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2013 at 11:23AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardengal48

Have grown this plant for a number of years. I think the idea re: some winter shelter is sound - I grew it first in my Shoreline garden then moved it when I relocated to the Kitsap area, both of which are on the milder end of our climate zone.

FWIW, my drimys is setting flowers right now. I prefer the lanceolata - smaller dark foliage that contrasts nicely with the dark red stems - than the winteri, which has larger, coarser foliage and plain green stems. But very fragrant flowers :-)

    Bookmark   March 6, 2013 at 4:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
George Three LLC

haven't tasted winteri, but lanceolata has great tasting leaves. cinnamon-esque.

    Bookmark   March 7, 2013 at 1:23AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ian_wa(Sequim)

When it got to 11 degrees in November 2010, a small Tasmannia (Drimys) lanceolata that I had planted the previous April froze back to the snow line. It is certainly a great looking plant for sheltered gardens. I guess there are a few other Drimys/Tasmannia species out there in the highlands of Southeast Australia that I have never heard of in cultivation - perhaps there is hope yet for a fully hardy one to be found.

    Bookmark   March 9, 2013 at 12:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Other, older, well-established specimens went down also - hence my previous comment. Meanwhile, Monrovia is trucking 5 gallon plants to local outlets as part of its Dan Hinkley line. I haven't checked to see if this stock was based on a more hardy clone that Dan might have selected.

I first encounted the species in the interesting and pleasant garden of Brian and Margaret Mulligan, near the east shore of Lake Washington, which I worked in on Sunday afternoons for a time. (Mr. Mulligan directed the Seattle arboretum from 1947-1972). As I remember it they had it against the sunny side of the house.

This post was edited by bboy on Sat, Mar 9, 13 at 11:46

    Bookmark   March 9, 2013 at 11:43AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Today I encountered Dan at the NHS sale, where he and Bob had a table set up, were selling plants. The Monrovia stock is based on seed he collected in the wild. They may have chosen a single seedling that looked superior to them, cloned it and used that as the basis for the Dan Hinkley Collection offering of Tasmannia.

Dan at first thought I was asking about an open-pollinated seedling of Drimys winteri that came up with partial Tasmannia characteristics. So apparently Monrovia has this as well.

It occurs to me that if the two cross like that it could be taken to imply that Tasmannia should stay in Drimys.

    Bookmark   March 9, 2013 at 6:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
winsorw(8)

Thanks Ian and bboy, great info.

    Bookmark   March 14, 2013 at 12:52AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardengal48

The variety of drimys Dan offers through Monrovia is Drimys winteri 'Pewter Pillar', a completely different plant both in origin (South America) and appearance from the pepper bush and supposedly at least one more zone hardier (z7) than the lanceolata. It gets much larger and has much bigger foliage, which could conceivably be more prone to cold damage than the more finer foliaged lanceolata.

    Bookmark   March 15, 2013 at 3:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Multiple local outlets currently have the Monrovia offering of Tasmannia (Drimys) lanceolata that I referred to above, discussed with Dan. Pewter Pillar is a registered trademark used to sell an obviously different selection or strain of D. winteri var. chiloense. I saw those around previously, probably as recently as last year.

This post was edited by bboy on Sun, Mar 17, 13 at 20:44

    Bookmark   March 17, 2013 at 8:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plantknitter(8)

Re: "It occurs to me that if the two cross like that it could be taken to imply that Tasmannia should stay in Drimys."

no more bigeneric hybrids?

Like --what was it?..... Mahoberberis?

    Bookmark   March 18, 2013 at 1:54AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

That genera never cross was not my assertion, but as it happens in that instance some would place Mahonia within Berberis.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2013 at 3:06PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
OK to plant garlic in February in Portland, OR?
Would it make sense to plant garlic in February in...
LanaRoma
Question re: NW Garden show
We are planning to go to the NW Garden show for the...
dottyinduncan
need pruning advice for culinary sage bush
I am the new owner of 2 very old sage shrubs badly...
saxonmjs
Re:Anyone growing citrus in PNW
Hi everyone, I have an indoor tangerine plant for 4-5...
sweetflowers
Shade-loving vine for Portland, OR
I recently moved into a house that doesn't have much...
bburan13
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™