pillow of goo with eggs

toad_ca(z7b Bellingham, WA)April 12, 2011

Twice in the last month or so, I've come across a pillow of goo (about 6 inches square) with what looks like quite a number of eggs held in suspension. The first time it was hanging from a rhodie and the second--today--it was on the ground in front of the rhodie. A friend said the description sounded like tent caterpillars, but I haven't been able to find a photo of them in this form to confirm. Any thoughts?

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

Not tent caterpillars.

any chance of pictures?

    Bookmark   April 12, 2011 at 6:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toad_ca(z7b Bellingham, WA)

I realize now that I passed up a terrific educational opportunity, but, frankly, I was so grossed out that I hurried to get rid of them before even thinking about my camera!

    Bookmark   April 12, 2011 at 6:50PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toad_ca(z7b Bellingham, WA)

morz8--a fellow NWer--came up with what I think is probably the answer (on the pest forum). It probably was tree frog eggs. But now I feel bad that I tossed them over the fence into the woods.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2011 at 3:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Maybe someone on the other forum has a good formula for frog spray.

    Bookmark   April 15, 2011 at 2:39PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toad_ca(z7b Bellingham, WA)

Yea! I was able to dig it out intact and wash it off a little. Any thoughts?

    Bookmark   April 15, 2011 at 5:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

Pacific Chorus Frog eggs. My little ponds out front are full of them but I've also found them in plants where there has been standing water.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2011 at 3:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Put it where the hatchlings can fall into a pool or pond.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2011 at 4:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dottyinduncan(z8b coastal BC)

Thanks for this educational post. Our native frogs are in so much trouble with the infestation of giant frogs that I would hate to disturb their eggs, should I be lucky enough to find some.

    Bookmark   April 18, 2011 at 11:55AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dan_staley(5b/SS 2b AHS 6-7)

Again, from another thread, not frog eggs.

Dan

    Bookmark   April 18, 2011 at 4:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plantknitter(8)

I sent the picture off to WSU expert and here is his take:

"From the size and appearance of the glob, I would say it is probably an egg mass from one of our common salamanders, Ampbystoma gracile, the Northwestern salamander. There is an image on the page at http://share3.esd105.wednet.edu/rsandelin/Fieldguide/Animalpages/Amphians/Salamanders.htm
I suspect that raccoons may have been prospecting in the pond and carried the eggs some distance. They are possibly distastful so were just left where they were dropped. Alternatively, if there are any children in the area, they may have tossed the eggs out."
The Slater Museum has a good photo, too, at http://slatermuseum.blogspot.com/2010_03_01_archive.html
cheers,
dave pehling

Here is a link that might be useful: Salamanders

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 10:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plantknitter(8)

scroll down to see another picture of the egg mass.

Here is a link that might be useful: Slater musuem

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 10:39AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

Salamander or treefrog they are both native amphibians that should be welcomed and not tossed over the fence ;).

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 11:29AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toad_ca(z7b Bellingham, WA)

Thank you so much! I will put them back in or near the edge of the pond.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 11:44AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
morz8(Washington Coast Z8b)

Nancy Ness from our local WSU extension thought they looked more like salamander too: "They look like salamander eggs to me. According to "Plants and Animals of the Pacific Northwest" by Eugene Kozloff, all our frogs and toads lay their eggs in water. Salamander are more terrestrial. "

Apparently salamanders do eat mosquito larvae so not a bad thing to have :)

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 12:34PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dan_staley(5b/SS 2b AHS 6-7)

Interesting. Dang coons!

Hopefully the eggs haven't dried out and will continue to develop.

Dan

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 7:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

I have found frog eggs outside of my ponds recently. Whether the froggies were confused because of all the rain/standing water or whether a raccoon transported them they were not where they were supposed to be, in the water. I dumped them all back into one of the ponds. I have many small and container ponds.

    Bookmark   April 21, 2011 at 3:47PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
What is good lilac to grow in North Seattle area?
My mom died last week. She liked smell of lilac flower. My...
briergardener_gw
Re:Anyone growing citrus in PNW
Hi everyone, I have an indoor tangerine plant for 4-5...
sweetflowers
need pruning advice for culinary sage bush
I am the new owner of 2 very old sage shrubs badly...
saxonmjs
evergreens for by gate
I have a couple of Columnar Dwarf Siberian Dogwood...
hallerlake
Aspirin and fig rust
Recently, I visited my brother in Thailand and he has...
winsorw
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™