Alfalfa Tea

Carol_WA(z8)April 4, 2009

I've always seen reference to Alfalfa Tea as being wonderful for roses. Does it have the same benefits for anything in my garden? Also, do you get more from the tea instead of the same ingredients under the bush? Thanks, Carol

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hallerlake

I've never used alfalfa tea, but I have used alfalfa in the garden. You scratch it in around the base of the plants. They love it. I especially liked it when I had a rabbits. I let them process it, and then recyled it in the garden.

    Bookmark   April 5, 2009 at 10:36AM
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gardengal48

Either the tea or the meal work in about the same fashion :-) The tea tends to release a growth hormone (triacontanol) that is contained in alfalfa faster, but the meal tends to stimulate soil biology more. Using the tea also gets the nutritional benefits of alfalfa down into the soil strates easier. The meal should be worked into the soil lightly to avoid attracting varmints that consider it tasty.

Many plants will recognize nutritional benefits from alfalfa, especially "heavy feeders" or those with strong nutrient demands - roses, clematis, lilies, most annuals and veggies. But using it in excess can promote rapid, leggy growth and since it breaks down so rapidly - generating heat - avoid placing it directly in the root zone to prevent burning of tender feeder roots. Using the tea pretty much negates this concern. As does cycling it through a bunny's digestive system first :-)

    Bookmark   April 5, 2009 at 2:32PM
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pdxmark

I've been using it to feed my more mature vegetable seedlings before transplanting them out of their containers. It doesn't seem to hurt them. I haven't done a head-to-head study to test effectiveness, though. Maybe I should do that once I have room in my seed sprouting area.

    Bookmark   April 6, 2009 at 4:50PM
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bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

>I haven't done a head-to-head study to test effectiveness, though. Maybe I should do that once I have room in my seed sprouting areaYes: Without a control group of matching but untreated plants, benefit is assumed rather than demonstrated.

    Bookmark   April 7, 2009 at 1:38AM
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pdxmark

>Without a control group of matching but untreated plants, benefit is assumed rather than demonstrated.Actually, benefit is hoped for rather than assumed. Absence of irreparable damage has been demonstrated.

    Bookmark   April 7, 2009 at 2:02PM
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