Greening up shrubs

dottyinduncan(z8b coastal BC)May 3, 2012

What is the fastest way to green up shrubs? I have one rhodie that has mild chlorosis, a sarcococca that is yellowish and a camelia that should be darker green. They are all in different areas of the garden and I'd like to give them a shot of something that would help them look healthier.Is there any quick fix?

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tanowicki

Spray paint?

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 10:32AM
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buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

Espona Holly Tone perhaps, I can't remember if it has chelated iron in it or not. I know Miracle Gro Acid fertilizer in the blue box does.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 11:56AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

There are probably different reasons for one or more of these shrubs being discolored. What will work for one may not help another. The sweet box may need magnesium (or more shade), the camellia nitrogen. Products like Holly Tone and chemicals like chelated iron I think are useful in areas with alkaline soils or other mineral situations not usual in this region.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 1:17PM
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dottyinduncan(z8b coastal BC)

Thanks for the info. With all of the rain falling today, I don't think even the green paint would work. Bboy, does this rain leach out too many of the nutrients? The rhodie that is suffering IS improving. I moved it out of the sun into more of a shady area and last year worked dilligently to make sure it had a good supply of nutrients and it does look better.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 2:44PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

The most common deficiency in plantings in this region is that of nitrogen.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 4:09PM
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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

Perhaps t he soil is still cold and wet. One or the other or a combo will slow root function -- thus plants look a tad said early on.

If that's the case, the plants will green up of their own accord when temps -- soil & air - are appropriate -- that is, warmer than they are now.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 7:39PM
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dottyinduncan(z8b coastal BC)

It sure is cold and wet!!! And it seems that the sun shines on non-gardening days. I think I will pep them up with a little nitrogen, it can't hurt. I think that the rhodie and the sweet box are both in saturated clay soils are likely the root cause. Thanks all.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 7:49PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

As the roots go, so goes the top.

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 7:53PM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

Growth is happenin' here, cold weather, or otherwise.
I'm way behind because of an ice storm that hit the foothills here.
Mike

    Bookmark   May 3, 2012 at 9:34PM
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gardengal48

Actually, iron deficiencies can be rather common in this area because our typically only mildly acidic soils tend to bind or hold this element. Bumping up the acidity or applying a chelated iron product can help a lot. That's why most acid-lovers ferts include an iron chelate component.

While I am not a huge fan of MiracleGro in most of its disguises, MirAcid (or MiracleGro for Acid Lovers) is a rather impressive "green-up" tonic for just about any broadleaved evergreen shrub. One should notice extremely rapid results.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2012 at 2:02PM
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buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

While I agree that I used it far more often in Phoenix with it's gawdawful alkaline caliche soil, I do keep a box of Mir-Acid in my shed for the occasional chlorotic rhododendron and it does work, fast. Which is why I recommended it....:D

I also agree that our three years of worse than normal rainfall have caused many plants to suffer. I've lost several established dwarf rhodies to drainage issues even though I've been amending for over fifteen years with compost. When I have dug them up the roots were severely rotted....

    Bookmark   May 4, 2012 at 2:47PM
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