Plants That Perplex

runktrun(z7a MA)June 18, 2008

Thought it might be fun to try and stump one another with photos of plants in our yard, if you donÂt have a camera you might find a photo by doing a google search. Feel free to use your macro lens, or take a shot of one of your seedlings, weeds, rare plantÂwhat ever but if no one guesses correctly be ready to give us another clue on day two and so on. Perhaps once someone has guessed correctly you could tell us a little something about the plant. kt

Plant One

Plant Two

Plant Three

Plant Four

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

Brilliant idea!

I have no idea about #1, #2, or #4, but I DO know that I really want one or more of whatever #4 is. (Is it a conifer, or a groundcover?)

#3 is sweet fern, which I always called blueberry fern (since it often grows in patches of lowbush blueberries). I had to look up the latin, it's Comptonia peregrina.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2008 at 12:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sedum37(Z5 MA)

Kt you have some weird stuff!

Sorry I don't have any idea. I did spend over $30 last year getting a book called "Weeds of the Northeast" something like that and it has sat on my shelf with the binding barely cracked....

    Bookmark   June 18, 2008 at 3:52PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrtulin

darn, I wanted to be the first one to say number 3 is comptonia. Well, I remembered the Latin name without looking it up...I knew half of it....
Plant 2 I should know...it is a woodland wildflower. I'll have to look it up

    Bookmark   June 18, 2008 at 10:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

#1 must be a climbing hydrangea - not one of the ones I've got, but an H. petiolaris. The leaves have the right shape... just a different texture than the standard ones.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2008 at 10:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrtulin

no 2 might be starflower. If it had a second whorl of leaves, if could be "wild cucumber" (sorry no latin names tonight)

    Bookmark   June 18, 2008 at 11:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
NHBabs(4b-5aNH)

OOOO! what fun!

Plant 1 (wild guess) - some kind of climbing hydrangea. What goreous leaves and petioles
Plant 2 looks like wild sarsaparilla to me.
Plant 3 - I agree with Digging, Comptonia peregrina, sweet fern
plant 4 - Is it really magnified Lycopodium, club moss, of some kind?

I'll have to go out with the camera sometime this weekend to take photos.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 6:01AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

You guys are soooo smart.
Plant Two - Wild Sarsaparilla - Aralia nudicaulis
This plant is native to North America and is found in both wet and dry woodlands. It has white flowers that are hidden by the leaves, buy midsummer it produces a cluster of blue colored berries and by September it starts losing its leaves. Wild Sarsaparilla forms extensive colonies by branching rhizomes and I have used it as a ground cover that I believe nicely ties together shrub borders that abut my woodland area.
Plant Three - sweet fern - Comptonia peregrine
Comptonia peregrine is native to Eastern North America and prefers sandy dry soil. Sweet Fern is not a fern it is in fact a deciduous shrub that will grow 2-3 feet tall and seems to be at its happiest at the edge of the woodland but it will still thrive as an understory plant. I have seen beautiful mass plantings of Comptonia peregrine used in the landscape, although this shrub is a plant that both deer and rabbits will devour I think it makes a great addition to the woodland garden and more formal shrub border.
Plant One You are very close this vine is considered a cousin to Climbing Hydrangea- Hydrangea Petiolaris. Note the color of the leaf stems is another clue.
Plant Four Young Conifer Tree

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 7:22AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

I thought #4 was a conifer that I've been coveting. I saw one in the clearance section at Mahoney's a few weeks ago, but can't recall the name. I'd have taken it but the tag said 'full sun' and there was no indication of ultimate size, and I'm seriously space challenged. It sure looked a little like a giant version of one of the smaller sedum varieties.

Do we have to keep guessing, or will you take pity on us and give us the name? It might still be sitting there at Mahoney's, waiting for me to come back.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 11:21PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

I had to google "hydrangea relative" "red stem" and it still took me about 3 or 4 tries. For a second I thought it might be the even more elusive Pileostegia viburnoides, but there was no mention of red stems on that one.

I guess we call both the H peteolaris and the Schizophragma climbing hydrangea because that is one mouthful of a name.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 11:29PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

What a good plant detective.
Plant One - Schizophragma hydrangeoides 'Rosea' This pink flowering vine blooms best in full sun, mine has yet to bloom but has been a moderate grower 3-4' a year. Pressumably the blooms are very large but frankly I like the vine enough that its flowers aren't all that important to me.
Plant Four dtd I don't know what conifer you saw at Mahoneys but I am nearly certain it wasn't this one as I know you are familiar with this tree and may have even seen them growing in their native country. Clue My tree at three years old 18"h x 18"w is relatively still in it's infancy as it is believed these trees will live for 1000 years and are considered living fossils.

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 6:49AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Well, heck, kt, is Plant Number Four a sequoia then?

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 5:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Hi dawiff,
Long time no see, good guess but it is not a sequoia. It's branches are razer sharp and cones can weigh as much as 17 lbs. kt

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 6:07PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

Araucaria araucana (Pehuén or Monkey-puzzle):

The hardiest species in the conifer genus Araucaria. It is native to central Chile and west central Argentina, and is an evergreen tree growing to 40 m tall and 2 m trunk diameter. Because of species' great age it is sometimes described as a living fossil.

I had to resort to google again, but the photo on wikipedia matched pretty perfectly.

I do think this is what I saw at Mahoneys ... being somewhat of a living fossil myself, I think I need one of these trees. How fast do they grow?

By the way, I've prowled all over my garden, camera in hand, and can't find a single thing that would perplex anybody. Nothing in the plant kingdom, anyway.

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 7:35PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Yes indeed this is a Monkey Puzzle Tree, which has a pretty good ten year success rate in our territory (Thanks to Polly Hill Arboretums specimens). I bought mine tube size from Forest Farm and planted them (yes two) in a southern facing protected location with irrigation. They have done wonderfully in our zone which to date has been horticulturally unpredictable. Most home owners prefer growing a male tree as the cones on the females can weigh as much as seventeen pounds which tend to break branches as they fall, but it may be hard to find a nursery that hasnÂt started one from seed.
SOOOOOOOO sorry dtdÂ. I am not letting you off the hook a few suggestions might be that fabulous plant by your front stairs that is airy and causes confusion with your neighbors, then of course there is my favorite plant of yours by the pool, now back to your front entry garden that has at least three species at all times that have not likely been seen by anyone on GW then letÂs talk about the best tree specimen I have ever seen when you first walk into the back garden, then letÂs talk about the oldest tree specimen of a rare but coveted tree I have ever seen (while looking at the front of your house to the left.) Hmmmm......nothing to take a photo of???? kt

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 8:30PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

Just noticed this thread and missed all the fun of guessing.
After the fact (of course!) could say that I correctly ID #1 Schizophrama cause I have several on my own and #4 Araucaria cause I'm very tempted to buy Cryptomeria japonica 'Araucarioides' when Olivers will have a sale next weekend and did some research on it. :-)

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 11:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Oh shoot, I almost guessed monkey puzzle tree (no, really!), but the other comments and the clue actually threw me off. I had no idea they were conifers or that they lived so long or were considered living fossils. I saw a large one a few years ago at a botanical garden in England when I visited my MIL.

I'm with dtd. There is nothing in my garden that would perplex anyone. There is plenty that perplexes me, though, i.e., plants with homemade markers that have washed off, plants that grow well in one location but die in another, similar location, how to keep groundhogs and bunnies from chowing down on my plants, etc., etc., etc.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 9:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Darn, I missed the game too. #1 doesn't look like my schizophragma. I think mine is 'Moonlight', maybe the leaf form is supposed to be different on the two cultivars???

I have comptonia all over my woodland edges, but its kinda scraggly looking and not very appealing. One time at a garden center, a nice pot of it caught my eye and I bought it. I kicked myself when I got home and realized I had tons of it naturally. Ironically, the purchased one died. Mother natures' do fine.

Are we continuing the game in the same thread? I could only find one possibly perplexing plant picture (PPPP)

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 1:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Here's #2. THis may be too easy, but we'll see.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 1:09PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

here's my third and final:

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 1:14PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

#1 is Variegated fiveleaf aralia ((Acanthopanax/Eleutherococcus sieboldianus 'Variegatus').
#2 Viburnum. V.sargentii?

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 4:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

#1 right on. good going. fyi, it died to the ground over the winter. I didn't expect that. But it is growing back again this year. Still smaller in height than last year, but I think more stems.

#2 yes, but I was hoping for the cultivar name. AFAIK, it is *THE* cultivar to have.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 7:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

Wendy, Onondaga?
Haven't seen one around here neither in commerce nor in landscaping, but remember seeing something very similar in US National Arboretum in Washington. Just guessing.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 9:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Good guess George! Out here I saw CVS planted an entire row of them along the roadway. That was a welcome surprise to see something other than the standard commercial fare.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 9:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggerdee zone 6 CT

Ooh! I guessed one right! That's a shock, lol. I knew the aralia.

That viburnum is gorgeous! I've never seen one of those. How nice!

:)
Dee

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 10:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Wendy you stumped me on all three. What is the fruit and fall color like on the V. 'Onodaga'? The seed pods are really cool and somehow familar but I just can't remember. kt

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 7:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

kt, I haven't seen fruit (yet?) on V. 'Onodaga'. It might need the right companion that I don't have. Not only is the fall color good, (maybe better in time or with more sun), the new growth is tipped in red and is striking. I think thats what attracted me to it at the nursery.

So nothing on #3.. hmmm... clue time.

dainty spring white flowers in May. The seed pods have 4 "wings". They turn brown and may provide a little bit of winter interest.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 7:50AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

question on wild sasparilla... Is it likely to be found along roadsides in New England? How many leaves on each plant? I see something quite like that amongst the poison ivy that I walk by and it seems to fight well with the P.I.. I thought maybe it was P.I morphed into 5 leaves. It seems VERY aggressive.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 7:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

I found a bunch more PPPP but they are still in my camera. Maybe someone else will start another game until I get to upload them.

off to do some early morning cool weeding, then to visit Mom who lives not far from Mahoney's!!! woo-hoo! Going to look for monkey puzzle

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 8:00AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Wendy,
Your V. 'Onodaga' is a real beauty the fall color is outstanding. Yes wild sasparilla is likely to be found growing amongst poison ivy and actually when it first comes up in the spring the shiny bronze colored leaves are hard to distinguish from poison Ivy. It has not been very aggressive for me and easily pulled from areas that I don't want it.

The seed pods are really cool and somehow familar but I just can't remember
Well now I recall why the seeds are familar I have this very delicate tree Halesia tetraptera - Carolina Silverbell.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 9:25AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Aha! I wondered the same thing as Wendy. There is a wild area at the side of the road on the way to Mahoney's in Winchester, where there is a lot of poison ivy, and when I drove past the other day, I thought I saw something that looked a lot like kt's wild sarsparilla there.

kt, did you buy yours, or did you find it growing on your land and cultivate it?

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 9:51AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

Wendy, possible pollinators for 'Onodaga':
-'Susquehanna' - also a US National Arboretum selection of the species that considered to be the most heavy flower and fruit producer, large, 8-10',
-'Chiquita' - MN University selection, dwarf 3-4' copy of the species, red berries, orange fall color,
-'name escapes me', but with yellow fruits.

Happy fruiting :-)

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 10:04AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrtulin

I have Onondaga. George, so you have it? If not, is there a way I can bring you a cutting when (not if) I come to see your collection?
Marie

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 10:16AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

Marie, I'd love to have it.
On one condition only: you'll take with you one of the two of my V.dentatum 'Autumn Jazz' (currently about 2x2') cause I'll have no space to plant Onondaga if AJ is not removed. Truly.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 10:46AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
viburnumvalley(z5/6 KY)

Dear Mr. ego45 6bCT:

It has come to our attention that reference was made to removal of a viburnum from your property.

This is simply not acceptable. We suggest you solicit the services of a superlative shrub specialist to support you; if you are unable to procure said services, one will be assigned to you.

Viburnums are excellent plants alone. They are exceptional plants when paired properly. Rather than radical removal, there should be additional space made for an appropriate amour for Autumn Jazz®, AND...add 'Onondaga' and your choice of partnering V. sargentii.

Should there be more talk of vanishing viburnums, viceroys will vent various vicious eviscerations, vindictively.

And we're not talking Lepidopterae...

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 1:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrtulin

George, you're on the spot!

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 1:39PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

No one else has anything perplexing? I found plenty. I think. Ready?

These are some seedlings my Herbaceous Plants (night school) instructor donated to the class. His daytime students started them earlier in the season. I was the only one who got the 1st one because I was the only person who could name it (genus,species) -- as long as pronunciation didnÂt count!!! LOL!

plants 1,2,3,4:

another view:

plant 5 (my bad):

plant 6: (bonus points for cultivar!)

plant 7

plant 8 (same genus as plant 7)

plant 9 (sorry bad pic)

plant 10

plant 11

plant 12 (another bad pic sorryÂ)

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 8:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Plant #2: Baptisia australis?
Plant #12: Podophyllum peltatum (aka Mayapple)?

#10 looks familiar, but I can't come up with a name right now.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 8:26PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Oh, is #1 a Dicentra spectabilis (bleeding heart) seedling?

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 8:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

V-valley,
Warning from Viburnum-police is duly noted.
Will ask permission from the neighbor to plant them on his property :-)
BTW, should I assume that native V.dentatum work as a polinator for AJ?

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 9:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Vivacious Viburnum ,
Thanks for stopping by I am particularly appreciative of your two cents now knowing you are on dial up and how long it took you to read through this thread. I was however hoping to pick your brain regarding Viburnum nudum 'Brandywine' that both idabean and I bought on a shopping spree this spring. We were told by the nurserymen that Viburnum n. ÂWinterthur would be a good fruiting partnerÂ.and amazing fruit it is. My question is I have found that Viburnum n. ÂWinterthur is very short lived in my highly acidic soil??? I have tried six of these shrubs in different locations over ten plus years and have noted the shrub begins by dying off by a third (vole damage?) then gets distinctive circular raised impressions on the branchesÂI can post a photo if you think this might help. runk
Wendy,
HmmmmÂ.you have some real puzzlers
Plant #11 Schizophragma hydrangeoides 'Moonlight,'
Plant #12 Angelica Giga
Plant #6 Hey IÂll do anything for bonus points Clerodendrum trichotomum 'Variegatum' Â variegated Glory Bower.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 9:49PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

#1. Dicentra spectabiles,
#2. Something from fabaceous family, possibly baptisia,
#3. ??? Lilium tigrinum????
#4. -----
#5. Fallopia japonica (Polygonum cuspidatum) 'Variegata'
#6. First notion was for Redosier dogwood (Cornus sericea) 'Baileyi' or 'Isanti', but white margins on a leaves are too good to be true for it. Cornus alba then.
#7 and 8. Threadleaf sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera) of some kind.
#9. ----
#10. Kirengeshoma palmata ssp. koreana.
#11. Schizophragma hydrangeoides 'Moonlight'.
#12. -----

How I'm doing? :-))

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 10:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Almost halfway there

George and Dawiff tied for lead at 2 apiece

#2: Baptisia australis (dawiff)
#5: Fallopia japonica Âvariegata (kt) (I am only growing it in shade in a difficult spot right up against big tree. I tried part of it in a bit more sun a few years ago and it took off in a very scary way!)
#6: Cornus alba (George )
#11: Schizophragma hydrangeoides ÂMoonlight (George)
#12: Podophyllum peltatum (aka Mayapple) (dawiff) - IÂve been growing it for a few years, but that is the first "apple" IÂve ever seen. Either I forgot to look or they were too young. I missed the flowers too.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 10:49PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Wendy, Could # 1 be a Thalictrum aquilegifolium seedling?

I realized after reading George's post that #10 did remind me of Kirengeshoma. But looks like that is not correct. I bet it's something with palmata as the second part of its name, though. :-)

I've had three Mayapples for about four years now, and have never seen fruit or flowers on mine either.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 11:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Dawiff, #1 is not thalictrum.

Those Mayapples really hide it well. Did you look closely recently? I just found that fruit yesterday.

#10: actually it does not have palmata in its name, but to me it looks similar to Mayapple foliage and it does have a piece of the mayapple botanical name in its genus name. very unusual plant. May not even have a common name.

#9 is also fabacea family.

#7 is eastern species #8 is western version.

#3 white flowers

#1 native to China

#4 Patriots WR

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 7:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

#10: I just learned that peltate leaf means shield shape. I don't really see a shield there, but maybe so.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 7:49AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Hmmmmmmm........#10: Darmera peltata?

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 9:28AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

good guess. but no. Is that umbrella plant? I've wanted that one for awhile. I guess I am attracted to shields :-)

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 10:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Dang! I keep coming back here hoping someone else has made a guess about Number 10, and googling stuff with shield-shaped leaves, but I haven't come up with anything that looks right yet. I want to know what it is! BTW, those white flowers standing above it ARE part of it, right? I think I have a thing about shield-shaped foliage too. I really like the way that looks. Is it a native? Does it like shade?

    Bookmark   June 24, 2008 at 5:27PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Thyme2dig NH Zone 5

#10 rodgersia?

    Bookmark   June 24, 2008 at 9:48PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

I'm truly perplexed by #10 too.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2008 at 10:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Thyme2dig NH Zone 5

#9 indigofera?

    Bookmark   June 24, 2008 at 10:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Thyme2dig NH Zone 5

#4 Moss (thanks for the clue) is there a variety name?
#7 & 8 Cytisus? Tough to tell from the pics, but look like they could be broom.
#1 possibly in the ranunculus family? (very wild stab)

    Bookmark   June 25, 2008 at 12:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
EGO45(6bCT)

thyme2dig,
I think you are right on a spot: Indigofera kirilowii (Chinese indigo).
Wendy, if it's indigofera, does it die to the ground for you and what condition do you provide for it?
My two attempts to grow it resulted in a two dead body.

    Bookmark   June 25, 2008 at 1:01AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

#10 was probably not really fair. its impossible to guess. its so unusual. I can't think of any clues to make it easier. It is Peltoboykinia watanabei. I found it at Plant Delights and got taken in by some alluring description. Its not showing on their website any more. There's another species that has a shiny leaf that looks cool too. It is a native.

#9 sorry, not Indigofera. clue: eat your veggies!!!

#4 yes it is moss. irish or scotch?

#7 & #8 weeping threadleaf forms of extremely common conifer

#1 genus can be woody or herbaceous (pic is woody)

#3 evergreen perennial

    Bookmark   June 25, 2008 at 7:00AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dawiff(z7 WA)

Is #1 a tree peony seedling?

#9: Snow peas? Except it looks like they are growing in a shady bed, and I thought most veggies needed full sun.

#7 & #8: Threadleaf or weeping arborvitae?

#3: Dianthus?

    Bookmark   June 25, 2008 at 10:02AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

Well, shucks, is #1 a baby tree peony?

    Bookmark   June 25, 2008 at 9:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

Yes, #1 is baby tree peony

#9 no, not snow pea but you're close. Recent gw discussion on this perennial by genus and specis (mine is different species than the GW discussion, but I didn't know that at the time)

#7 & #8 yes arborvitae, but they are vastly different plants. why? size matters.

#3, no not dianthus. halloween + N.E. University

    Bookmark   June 26, 2008 at 10:19AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
diggingthedirt

#3 myst be candytuft... great, if cryptic, clue!

    Bookmark   June 27, 2008 at 2:05PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2015 #3
This thread is intended to give people a place to post...
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
How are you guys holding up in this "Snowpocalypse"??
Hi guys, haven't been posting much, but still lurk...
terrene_ma
Deer resistant evergreen shrub
Was wondering if you have any suggestions for an evergreen...
BloominOnion
Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2015 #2
This thread is intended to give people a place to post...
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
The Great Backyard Bird Count Feb 13-16, 2015
The Great Backyard Bird Count Feb 13-16, 2015 About Claire...
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™