hatch chili seeds

granygreenthumb(7a)February 14, 2010

We lived in New Mexico for 28 years before moving to Oklahoma.

Hatch chili peppers were always in demand in our neck of the not so woods. Hatch,New Mexico thus the name.

Just the smell of fresh roasting chili is amazing, and the taste is out of this world. I bought some dried chili from a vendor and I have a some to share with anyone who would like some. These are a medium heat chili. I don't know what determines a hot chili but these were very mild to us. We like them hot.

Send me an email and we'll get started.

Teresa

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soonergrandmom

Do you think they are an open pollinated variety?

    Bookmark   February 14, 2010 at 6:11PM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Yes they are.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2010 at 10:25PM
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elkwc(6b)

Did the vendor say they were open pollinated? The only reason I ask is there is several varieties they grow now and call Hatch Chili's. Some are open pollinated and some are hybrids. I bought some last winter. Some hot and then some mild. They were both hybrids and didn't produce true to what the pods were I took them from. There are some open pollinated varieties. I have a few different types of NM chilies I grow myself. But would always try another if you have extra seeds. Although I prefer heat and grow some with some heat I have family and others who prefer the mild. Jay

    Bookmark   February 14, 2010 at 11:54PM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Thanks Jay,

No the vendor didn't say weather they were open pollinated or hybrid. It never crossed my mind to ask, either. Maybe my offering was not such a good idea.

The things we learn as gardeners!

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 4:07AM
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macmex

Teresa, you might also want to do a germination test on your seed. Some dried chilis have been dried on heat, and their germination rate can be quite low. To do such a test, just take a sample of seed and wrap them in a damp paper towel. Place the towel inside an open ended plastic bag. If they're going to germinate, they'll probably start within the week.

George
Tahlequah, OK

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 4:57AM
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elkwc(6b)

Teresa,
It don't hurt to try a few. Like I said I did last summer. They might be op's. You will never know till you grow a few. I usually grow some experiment every summer. I like surprises but just wanted you to know the possibilities. I will do some looking when I have time for a link to a site that tells about some of the varieties they grow. I just know they are growing more hybrids than they have in the past. I was born and lived in NM early in my life. So raised on NM chilies. My favorite type. Jay

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 8:00AM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Thanks George,
My seeds are now waiting to sprout. Have my fingers crossed.

Jay,
NM chilies are the best. I did a Google on Hatch Chili seeds, $8.99 for a package is the price from Hatch.
Last year I bought a few plants at WM and they did ok, but not as productive as I thought they would be. It could have been due to any number of things being it was my first year to plant in Oklahoma.

Thanks for the advice guys, I appreciate the information.

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 9:03AM
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elkwc(6b)

Teresa,
I will look through my seeds and see what I have. I should have some NM types with a little more heat. If so would be glad to send you a few. Jay

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 9:59AM
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elkwc(6b)

Teresa,
Here are two sites I really like for NM chile types. The first one I think you have to buy 5 packs of seeds. Prices are very reasonable I feel. The second one is part of NMSU. It has a lot of information also. Just download and open the 2010 catalog. I think you will find both interesting. Jay

http://www.enchantedseeds.com/index.htm
http://aces.nmsu.edu/chilepepperinstitute/chile-pepper-institute-c.html

    Bookmark   February 15, 2010 at 10:26AM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Thanks for the links, Jay. I really like the Enchanted seed
company. I plan to call them today and place an order.
I'm wondering what the shelf life will be for a packet of 50 seeds? I won't plant all the seeds at one time so do you think they will be ok to use next year? I just don't have the space for that many right now.

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 16, 2010 at 8:20AM
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Okiedawn OK Zone 7

Teresa,

Shelf life of seed varies depending on how it is stored. I routinely use seed that is as old as 5 or 6 or 7 years old with really great germination rates, although at that age, the germination rate is a little lower than it was when the seed was fresh. I believe the oldest pepper seed I've ever successfully germinated was probably 7 or 8 years old. Since that is an anecdotal answer, I checked Suzanne Ashworth's book to get you a more science-based answer, and she says pepper seed will retain 50% viability for 3 years if stored in a cool, dry location. That's not bad when you consideration that the Federal Germination Standard for commmercially sold pepper seed is 55%.

There are many ways to store seeds. I have so many seed varieties that I keep them in their original packets taped shut with painter's purple masking tape (because it peels off easily when I need to open a packet and take out seed) stored in gallon-sized zip-lock bags inside a large plastic storage tote that's probably about a 32-quart tote.

If you have smaller quantities of seeds, you can store them in airtight containers (zip-locks, jars, plastic food-type food storage boxes, etc.) in your freezer. Cold storage of seed is the best method to use if space allows. (I can't do it.....I'd have to have a freezer just for seeds.) The second-best method is to store in airtight containers in the refrigerator. If storing at room temperature as I do, keep the seed in airtight containers in a cool, dry location where the temperature and humidity remain as stable as possible. An unheated pantry or closet is a great place to store seed. I store my seed crate in the tornado shelter/root cellar much of the time....at least when I'm not busy starting seeds.

If you save your own seeds, make sure they are as dry as possible before you put them in an airtight container to store them. You want your saved pepper seeds to be so dry that one will break in half if you try to fold it in half with your fingers. If it bends but doesn't break, it needs to dry some more before you put it up for storage.

Hope this info helps.

Dawn

    Bookmark   February 16, 2010 at 9:07AM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Wow!! Seven or eight yrs. I don't think I have ever kept seeds that long. I normally toss them when they are about 3 yrs. old, but I won't do it anymore and I keep them in a closet in one of the spare bedrooms. Thanks Dawn as always I appreciate you help.

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 16, 2010 at 3:54PM
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ilene_in_neok

Teresa, I sent you an e-mail. I'd like to try those Hatch seeds. I like surprises.

I see you're doing a germination test... It took my peppers ten days to germinate and some of them still haven't emerged yet. And that's with bottom heat. So don't give up too early, OK?

    Bookmark   February 17, 2010 at 7:09AM
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elkwc(6b)

Teresa,
Glad you liked the links. I thought they would be of interest where you like NM type chilies. Dawn answered the question about keeping seeds. And making sure they are dry is very important. I store all of mine is small zip locks. Usually inside a larger zippie and then in the plastic folgers cans or a canning jar with a good seal. And have had good results so far. I don't keep them as cool as I should at all times. But my method works for me. Depending on variety I've seen some hot pepper seeds take 20-24 days. So be patient. Most of mine come up in 8-15 but there seems to be a few exceptions every year. Jay

    Bookmark   February 17, 2010 at 7:26AM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Germination, Determination!! I don't give up easily.
Thanks Ilene I replied to your email.

Jay,
I didn't keep my seeds in zip lock bags but they were stored in a cool place all winter. I will be changing that this year. I will be saving some of the seeds from the peppers, should I leave them on the vine or can I just save seeds from mature peppers that I have picked?

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 17, 2010 at 9:04PM
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elkwc(6b)

Teresa,
I do both. And have had good results with both. Just make sure to let them dry well. I also pull the whole plant and let them dry in the garage hanging or remove a few pods and string them and let them dry. Then save seeds as I use the peppers for cooking. I still have pepper seeds on paper on plates I haven't bagged yet. I remember some of the old timers in NM would just dry the pods and then open the pods in the spring and plant them as they removed them. I do soak my seeds as I soak most seeds I plant anymore. Not a requirement. Just a personal preference. Jay

    Bookmark   February 18, 2010 at 7:18AM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

I just want to say thanks for all the infomation Jay, Dawn, George and Ilene. I have learned so much from all of you.

This is the best place on the web to get information for anyone on anything.

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 19, 2010 at 3:58PM
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granygreenthumb(7a)

Just wanted to let you all know that my germination test is going great. I placed 12 seeds in a bag with a damp paper towel just like George told me and 5 have sprouted today.

Yeah, I'm thrilled to say the least.

Teresa

    Bookmark   February 22, 2010 at 8:59PM
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Okiedawn OK Zone 7

Teresa,

You're welcome. I hope you'll remember that most of us have learned all this stuff the hard way...no one is born just automatically knowing all this gardening stuff. So, whatever troubles you encounter, we've just been there, done that....

Glad the germination test worked. You can pre-sprout just about any seeds that way and just move them to the potting mix when they sprout. I pre-sprout my corn seed that way...in paper towels or coffee filters in a bag and then plant them directly into the ground. It saves a few days' time and frustration, and since every pre-sprouted seed grows, I don't have 'gaps' in the rows of corn.

The only seeds that are very hard to pre-sprout are the teensy tiny ones.

Dawn

    Bookmark   February 22, 2010 at 10:00PM
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ssimon2000(7 - Central Oklahoma)

Hi Teresa,
I'd like to try some seeds, if you still have some. Email coming your way.

Thanks!
Steve

    Bookmark   February 23, 2010 at 10:20AM
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