Fuschias - Annual or Perennial?

BrendaInBC66August 11, 2013

Hi,

I have 3 fuschias, and I don't know if they are annual or perennial. I also have no clue what to do with them over the winter, if they are perennial. I live in Zone 8, in British Columbia. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

http://tinypic.com/r/x3togk/5

http://tinypic.com/r/f5ae80/5

http://tinypic.com/r/2r27hgp/5

Thanks,
Brenda

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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Can you list their names here?

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 1:19PM
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BrendaInBC66

That's the problem, I don't know their names. I will try to figure that out now and see what I come up with!

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 2:11PM
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gardengal48

Most likely non-hardy or annual types. Hardy fuchsias tend to be more upright and shrubby than the arching, pendulous habit of trailing or basket fuchsias. Hardy fuchsias also tend to have a more simple (or less doubled) flower form than annual fuchsias.

All three of those look like common, basket-type varieties - 'Black Prince', 'Swingtime' and 'Blue Satin'.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 2:52PM
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BrendaInBC66

I found the tag for one, it's a Pink La Campanella, and the other, I remember it had Voodoo written on it. The last one I'm coming up with either Lady Thumb, or Jimgle Bells. Now to find out if there is any way to overwinter them all!

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 3:40PM
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gardengal48

Even annual fuchsias can be overwintered relatively easily. You can research former threads in GW's Fuchsia forum or check online for instructions.

Hardy fuchsias are even easier to overwinter but I do recommend planting them early enough so they have sufficient time to establish before colder weather sets in. And it's important to know that there are degrees of hardiness :-) Some hardy fuchsias are just not nearly as hardy as other selections and some annual type fuchsias can be hardier than one would expect, especially in mild winters

I tend to follow the British Fuchsia Society's list of hardy fuchsias as I find it is much more conservative than local lists, which tend to include everything equally. The UK rates fuchsias by hardiness levels - H1 is not hardy at all; H2 is hardy with a good winter mulch; and H3 is fully hardy in the ground.

Of the ones listed, all are H1 fuchsias with the exception of Lady Thumb/Jingle Bells, which I'd consider to be H2 at best.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 6:06PM
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BrendaInBC66

Thank you for that gardengal. Mine are all in pots right now, and I had planned to try overwintering them in our shed. I had read about that when I got my first one, but I got confused as to what would or would not overwinter. Maybe now I can figure out what to do with them!

    Bookmark   August 11, 2013 at 9:43PM
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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

- All fuchsias are perennials. Some are hardy perennials, some are are tender perennials.

- Fuchsias which die with freezing temps are often grown for only one season -- that is, as "annuals." These fuchsias are tender perennials. They will survive the winter if protected. They may also be over-wintered as cuttings with protection

- So-called hardy fuchsias are hardy outdoors in our region. They may have "hardy to X degrees F" in the description.

    Bookmark   August 12, 2013 at 1:05PM
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gardengal48

Jean, I am well-aware that all fuchsias are technically perennials. So are many of the other plants that are commonly sold as annuals, but it is that terminology that most gardeners are familiar with and how the plants are commonly sold in nurseries - plants that survive winter in the ground are labeled and considered to be "perennials" and those that will not overwinter outdoors/in the ground are labeled and considered to be "annuals" regardless of what their lifecycle may be in their natural environment.

    Bookmark   August 13, 2013 at 2:41PM
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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

Disagree.

As was said, perennials are always perennials.

If every gardener understood that,and knew that some were tender, they would be enlightened as to how to keep that sort alive rather than be disappointed and turned off from gardening.

    Bookmark   August 13, 2013 at 10:45PM
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BrendaInBC66

I didn't mean to start a feud about it all...I think I can go from here and hopefully figure out how to overwinter them...

    Bookmark   August 13, 2013 at 11:15PM
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OregonGrape

Despite the fact that some of the non-native fuchsias that are incorrectly labeled as "annuals" die back in winter, they often grow back in the spring. Obviously, mild winters like this past one help tremendously. My wife has a few that appear similar to the ones in your pics, and they all came back in April.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2013 at 1:13AM
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BrendaInBC66

Thank you OregonGrape...that gives me some hope...I am by no means an expert gardener....

    Bookmark   August 14, 2013 at 1:15AM
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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

It's not a feud. It's a clarification of facts.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2013 at 6:03PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

I think too, that it is perennial with certain degree of hardiness.
We have one planted in a pot last year. It over wintered and flowering now. It is an upright woody type, not cascading kind.

It is possible that in a severe deep freezing conditions , most of them might not make it.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2013 at 3:31PM
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BrendaInBC66

After researching all of this I have decided I am taking over my husband's shed (part at least) to try overwintering these plants. I had a couple of other plants I originally wanted to know about, but I will research them alone.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2013 at 11:30PM
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jacqueinthegorge(USDA 8 / Sunset 5)

Deb and Ron Monnier trialed many fuchsia varieties and developed a list of those hardy to the PNW, and also bred some of their own varieties. They have moved on to other things, but they sold their fuchsia business to Fry Road Nursery in Albany, OR, which is carrying on competently. Lots of pics and info on their site.

    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 10:31PM
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