can i grow olive trees in the portland vancouver area?

onamission(sw)September 5, 2006

Would like to grow some olive trees and live in the Portland area. The climate is much like Italys but I don't know if other conditions are conducive to growing olives in this area. If it is possible to grow them, does anyone know of a nursery that sells them? Thanks

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JudyWWW(z7/WA)

You can get them from One Green World via their website. OGW is local but mostly sells mailorder. They also show up at the larger independent nurseries. I know several people who have thriving trees In Portland. jwww

    Bookmark   September 6, 2006 at 1:55AM
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hemnancy(z8 PNW)

Burnt Ridge has Arbequina in a small size.

    Bookmark   September 6, 2006 at 7:51AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

As long as it stays above, say, 10-15 degrees F.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2006 at 2:51AM
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zzepherdogg(7)

Would it have olives on it that would ever get ripe enough to fix for eating?

    Bookmark   September 7, 2006 at 9:42PM
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buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

Seriously doubt it. Sorry.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 1:10PM
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zzepherdogg(7)

Thanks BuyorSell, thats what I thought too, but it would still be a cool plant/tree for the collection.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 2:43PM
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hemnancy(z8 PNW)

I planted Arbequina by a south-facing concrete wall of my house this year, so I hope it at least survives. On the other side I have a Loquat but have never seen any hint of flowers on it. Both have medicinal properties in their leaves, though, that make them worthwhile for me to grow.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 5:10PM
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buyorsell888(Zone 8 Portland OR)

Personally, I saw enough Olives in Phoenix that I would never want to plant one. They may very well grow and fruit here, not my specialty, I do know that processing the fruit to be edible is a PITA and most fruiting olives in the SW just make a mess all over the ground. Fortunately, non fruiting varieties are now available.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 5:38PM
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onamission(sw)

I forgot to mention that I want to make olive oil from the olives. Do you think it's possible or are the types of nurseries mentioned, only sell the ones for eating? I grew up in Italy. My mother had a farm full of olive trees that were harvested for olive oil. The olive oil had a very strong flavor which I love. They put nets under the trees to catch the olives. With the price of olive oil (39.00 3 liter tin) I think I need to learn how to make my own. Anyone else notice that the price of olive oil in the Portland area recently quadrupled? WINCO wants 13.00 for one quart.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 10:37PM
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onamission(sw)

I am so excited. I just checked out the One Green World website. They even have fig trees and loquats which I grew up on in Italy. I'm in seventh heaven. And yes the olives can be used for oilve oil. They will even send tips for processing. Yipeeeee. GRAZIE for the lead.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 10:43PM
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JudyWWW(z7/WA)

One Green World was at the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon Fall plant sale today along with about 50 other specialty vendors. They had both olives and figs there. The sale is on tomorrow also and I'm sure they will restock in the morning. There is no entry charge and the sale is at the Washington County Fairgrounds in Hillsboro. I believe it runs from 10 to 2 tomorrow. Check it out at www.hardyplantsociety.org. I've never had anything but top quality plants from OGW. My Atreano fig from OGW had a bumper crop this year and it looks like the second crop may even ripen this year! If you haven't ever been to the HPSO plant sales you are in for a treat. It is a dangerous place. I stayed under budget and then worked a volunteer shift.....after seeing all of the wonderful treasures others found my will power was destroyed and I had to go back for more........jwww

    Bookmark   September 9, 2006 at 11:07PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Not that there should be anything wrong with doing so, but you aren't limited to dealing with them directly to get olive trees from One Green World -- this company wholesales to garden centers. Many of them up here have the particular cultivar mentioned, as well as other plants they produce. Fig trees especially are almost a standard item at outlets here. Even though they are serving primarily an urban and suburban market there is plenty of interest in eating, fruit trees and berry bushes are available from most places.

If you get on the phone there is probably someplace in the nearest large community that has the olive in stock.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2006 at 3:45PM
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anasophia

I'm planning to plant an olive tree, and I've heard from several people who have them that they do fine in Portland, and even produce fruit. The main advisement it to be sure to put it in a sunny, well-drained spot.

    Bookmark   April 21, 2007 at 9:52PM
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olivesmedfordor

GB accapp@charter.net

    Bookmark   August 26, 2008 at 1:42PM
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kevinkimmel

There is an article in the Seattle PI entitled "Good Enough To Eat: Grow olives in Seattle? You bet your martini" which tells of a Basil Papahronis who is successfully growing olives in Seattle with a harvest of fully ripe olives. The link to this article is: http://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/homegarden/article/Good-Enough-To-Eat-Grow-olives-in-Seattle-You-1171347.php
Papahronis reveals his technique of how he is able to have olives this far north. I believe that if you can grow olives in Seattle than any city south of Seattle should be as successful as Paphronis. Good luck!

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 1:56AM
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PRO
George Three LLC

lots of great advice at the link below. my experience is that you need REAL honest to goodness full day sun.

Here is a link that might be useful: Oregon Olive Trees

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 11:17AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

By the way Seattle is actually milder than areas to the south because it is on Puget Sound. Except for over on the outer coast you have to get far enough down there for the effect of latitude to kick in before winters become as mild or milder.

    Bookmark   September 19, 2013 at 3:50AM
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tcstoehr

Hope springs eternal I suppose. But why fight the climate? For a handful of low quality olives? One Green World will sell you things that have virtually no chance of success. I have been there many times, toured their facilities and listened to Jim's lectures. These guys promote a lot of plants that are marginal in our climate. I don't know about you, but I have enough problems with the trees I have that *do* like our climate.
Figs, on the other hand... Latarula and Desert King are winners.
There's actually an olive farm nearby that I once visited while they were having an open house. Not at all a mature business yet. I told the owner that I didn't know you could grow olives in the PNW. He responded honestly that he didn't know either.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2013 at 6:21PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Yes, note the lack of visible mature specimens anywhere in the region - yet in California these are common. Unless more hardy, recently circulated cultivars really do represent a significant broadening of the climate tolerance long term survival is doubtful.

Lots of USDA 9 stuff will grow up here for years - only to be taken down or out when it finally gets too cold for them.

I'm much more attuned to planted flora visible in the general landscape than most people and I have never seen an olive tree of any vintage in this area.

And don't think it won't be for lack of people trying such a culturally important crop plant.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2013 at 10:02PM
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PRO
George Three LLC

david at oregon olives is pretty honest about their hardiness. he basically considers them to be dieback shrubs in the long run. which follows everyone's observations that there are no secret long standing trees around.

another point that he raises is that not just low temperature, but total heat/sun and recovery from cold damage are important.

one of is new favorite varieties is relatively sensitive to cold, but grows very fast in the climate.

in my experience, i would put an olive tree out in a place where you want a nice small tree/shrub focal point, but with expectations of survival for just a decade or so. replace when knocked back, or very slowly start retraining the shrub back into a tree.

Here is a link that might be useful: an olive tree to try

    Bookmark   October 17, 2013 at 3:32PM
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