Transplanting Rosemary??

terri_pacnw(z7-8 WA)September 1, 2005

When is the best time or does it matter?

I have a large bush of rosemary that is in a spot that needs to be the location of a new shed. It's been in this spot for atleast 8 years. How far out should I dig around it, and what's the best way to move it?

Thanks!

Terri

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Sam_WA(7b/8a)

In my experience they don't move very well, especially when they're big and old. But they do root from cuttings pretty easily (It's been awhile since I've done it, but I think they'll root in water), and once they're well rooted, they establish quick.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2005 at 3:32PM
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mikeplantsflowers(z8OR)

I have been able to transplant older rosemary plants in the fall. The larger the rootball the better. There is a chance the plant may die so do take cuttings and root them in water or a clean rooting medium. Under good conditions you could have two foot plants(or larger) within two summers. Good luck

    Bookmark   September 1, 2005 at 7:10PM
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mkirkwag(Puget Sound)

I know this isn't a real answer - sorry - but I thought I'd pass on that when I inspected my rosemary Irene, I found that it had made many new little plants around it's base, and those transplanted easily. You should probably check for those - they weren't at all obvious - and get those going as backups somewhere before you take the whole thing out.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2005 at 1:00PM
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viola8(z8)

We've transplanted a rosemary twice at work (garden center). It's probably 6 years old now ('Tuscan Blue'). It was huge the 2nd transplant. I dug around it and then dragged it out of the hole. Had to get help to get it to the new bed. It was planted in really well drained raised beds the 2nd and 3rd times. I'm sure that's why it's done so well--tons of sun and very little water. Probably transplanted both times in the spring.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2005 at 2:02AM
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drmedica(z7-8OR)

Did mine in the fall, 2 different years. Both times I cut back hard. The first one (younger) recovered quicker than the 2nd one but both are fine. I also had bits that rooted (both of mine are prostrate forms) so had back up pieces to plant too and ended up with more plants than I started with. Just water regularly til rains start. Neither of mine were as old as yours tho.

Donna

    Bookmark   September 13, 2005 at 5:49PM
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herboholic

I have about 5 rosemary bushes that are HUGE and in containers. I've always had to contain them because the soil in the backyard is clay-based and not very good drainage. BUT...this year we're making planting beds (actually redesigning the backyard especially for an herb garden) and I want to take the rosemary out of their containers and put them in the ground. I am positive that when I go to do this they will come out of their containers in one piece....the shape of the container.

Should I bother the roots at all, loosen things up, or should I leave well enough be?

They are all so healthy right now, I don't want to lose a single one of them. For reasons I won't go into, a couple of them hold extreme sentimental value for me.

They've survived in their pots through the winter so far, despite temps being 10 degrees and some snow. They're very strong plants and well established. But I, like others who've posted here, have concerns about disturbing the rosemary and moving it.

From pot to ground. Should it be that big a deal as if I were to dig it up from the ground and relocate it in another part of the garden? I'm just wanting to de-containerize them and plant them in the new garden beds.

    Bookmark   February 9, 2008 at 10:18AM
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odette1229cat_aol_com

To herboholics question:
I too have alot of Giant Rosemary plants in my yard, and love them. I am going to move mine out from in front of the house; to the side of my yard; hoping to make a beautiful hedge out of them, with my knock-out roses. I have moved these once before, when they were about half their size now, and what I did was to get their new hole dug first, then when I dug them up; made sure to come out to their Drip-line and start breaking the dirt, all the way around the plant. This will be quiet a big rootball; but to me thats the best way for them to survive. To get the plant from one side of the yard to the other; I try and get the plant on a big Tarp; that way you can drag the plant, without messing up the roots or disturbing the dirt around it. I also suggest that you plant it in a raised mound; this will settle with time and water. They do need some water. I always from time to time, mostly early morning, like to mist the plants all over to keep the plant hydrated. Hope this helps..

    Bookmark   April 14, 2010 at 10:56AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

I'd just plant a new one and discard the old one. We're not talking about 50 year old rhododendrons here.

Cutting back the top just makes the plant easier to move. It does not help the plant.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2010 at 1:09PM
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larry_gene

I tried a rosemary hedge and ended up removing all but the two end plants after a few years. Once they got big enough to crowd each other, there was a lot of branch die-off in the hedgerow.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2010 at 11:18PM
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siarl_bychan

I transplanted a very small rosemary plant that was doing poorly. It was in a container with a reservoir. Without saying who, it would get watered daily regardless of whether it needed it or not. Became waterlogged and was dying on me. I thought I would rescue it by taking it out of the container and placing it in a clay pot that has a drainage hole. Well, it dropped every one of it's leaves and now appears dead. Would the root base still be alive? Can I continue hoping for the best or is that the end of it? What is everyone else's experience with this situation? Thank you.

    Bookmark   May 26, 2014 at 8:07PM
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siarl_bychan

I transplanted a very small rosemary plant that was doing poorly. It was in a container with a reservoir. Without saying who, it would get watered daily regardless of whether it needed it or not. Became waterlogged and was dying on me. I thought I would rescue it by taking it out of the container and placing it in a clay pot that has a drainage hole. Well, it dropped every one of it's leaves and now appears dead. Would the root base still be alive? Can I continue hoping for the best or is that the end of it? What is everyone else's experience with this situation? Thank you.

    Bookmark   May 26, 2014 at 8:23PM
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larry_gene

Unless this plant was a special gift or has sentimental value or is a very rare variety, I would buy a new rosemary plant. If the clay pot has but one drainage hole, water the new plant sparingly. You will eventually be able to tell by the heft of the pot how dry the soil is becoming. You will also need a plan to keep you-know-who from daily watering this plant.

Otherwise you can keep an eye on the original, but it could take many weeks for it to show signs of life.

    Bookmark   May 26, 2014 at 10:52PM
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