daphne bholua in NW

George Three LLCNovember 11, 2013

i am planning on treating in the way I have treated odora's with success. east facing, no direct summer water.

anyone know the cultural requirements around here? i have found a lot of information online about how to grow it in the UK... and it seems pretty different.

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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

No summer water is liable to be a mistake, this is a monsoonal climate woodland species - it won't want any drought, wind, or hot afternoon sun, and will want good deep soil. Since stock I see at plant stores here usually (always?) is labeled simply as the species, without any cultivar name specific attributes are uncertain - is it clonal material of one of the more recent, hardier introductions with other superior characteristics (good quality flowers etc.) being circulated here without the cultivar name, or something else?

    Bookmark   November 11, 2013 at 3:33PM
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George Three LLC

yes, just marked straight species. plant tag did not identify who grew it. but i got it from portland nursery, so i could probably find out if i just emailed them.

interesting about summer water. i'll site it closer to the bib then in case it needs it. i hope its not a water hog like the vaguely related edgeworthia.

    Bookmark   November 11, 2013 at 11:07PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

The few places I have seen it self seed were in fairly deep shade under our native Douglas Firs with no supplemental water, if that's any clue.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 12, 2013 at 2:05AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

If you are thinking of Daphne laureola by mistake that is from a different area with a different climate - and has actually reached nuisance levels of frequency in this region. Or maybe you are talking about D. mezereum?

D. bholua is a tall, sparse one with slender, down-pointing leaves that may all fall off after sharp weather, and the clusters of flowers scattered around the largely vertical framework. It is not like any of the familiar species and has not been seen that much here, either at outlets or in plantings - it being known to have come up from seed here multiple times would definitely be new to me.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2013 at 2:51PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

Ron, all I know is what I saw were Daphnes. I'm not familiar with the different varieties and don't plant temperamental plants. I don't have the time or inclination. I'll leave that to the collectors and serious hobbyists.
Perhaps I shouldn't have chimed in with my limited knowledge. I thought they would all have approximately the same growing conditions do do well.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 12, 2013 at 4:06PM
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gardengal48

LOL!! Mike, what you have seen IS most likely Daphne laureola - as Ron stated, this is an extremely weedy species typically planted by birds and is actually on the WA state noxious weed list. Of all the daphnes, this one tops the list as one of the least fussy plants you could imagine! Happiest in some shade, it seems to thrive under our native conifers and is amazingly drought tolerant. It also has rather unattractive greenish-yellow flowers and no fragrance to speak of.

Many folks mistake it as a small rhododendron.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2013 at 4:37PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

Thank you Gardengal48.
Love the Internet. Learn something all the time.
One place I saw the daphne was near the entrance to the Royal Roads Botanical Garden just west of Victoria, Canada a couple years ago. Plus a few sites here in Maple Valley down by the Cedar River
I've got to get out more. Since I've retired, my wife and I hardly go anywhere.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 13, 2013 at 2:40AM
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mariev_seattle(PNW Z8 Sunset Z5)

There's a Daphne Bholua in Capitol Hill growing on the East side of the street on Harvard between Olive and Howell, across the street from Seattle Central Community College. It blooms for about a month in January and smells divine! I always stop and smell the blooms when I walk by it on my way to work. The photos I took below were taken in early January.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 12:40AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Wonderful specimen!

Situation looks familiar, I probably saw the plant before it was this big and full.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2014 at 1:22PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

Wonderful, is right!
How come these aren't all over the place?
Mike

    Bookmark   February 24, 2014 at 2:34PM
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George Three LLC

hope mine looks like that someday.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2014 at 6:01PM
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mariev_seattle(PNW Z8 Sunset Z5)

I agree, this one's wonderful, and they should be everywhere. I've only ever seen a few Daphne Bholua's in 1 gallon containers at Sky Nursery in the winter, when the plants are blooming. I'm always tempted to get one, but it would probably take 10 years or more for that small a plant to get this big. I would say this specimen is about 7+ feet tall and 4-5' wide. It continues to grow a few inches taller and wider each year.

BTW, I made a mistake in my previous post. This is actually on the West side of Harvard, facing East, so it thrives in a spot with morning sun and afternoon shade.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2014 at 11:25PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

I have seen this recently at both Sky and Molbak's. Expect to be spending over 50 dollars for a specimen of moderate size. In both locations the plants are labeled simply as the species; but I've been told by someone involved in the process that Molbak's had gotten in 'Jacqueline Postill' in the past. Perhaps the supplier lists them under the cultivar name but is using only the species names on tags that go out with the plants to retail outlets. Or all the stock being offered in this area is the one cultivar but the name is not being used much here.

'Jacqueline Postill' is the preeminent cultivar in Britain and the one a body might hope to get here (it and 'Gurkha' are both on the current RHS Award of Garden Merit list).

This splendid and very hardy form originated as a seedling of 'Gurkha' raised by our propagator Alan Postill in 1982. It is evergreen or semi-evergreen, flowering when in full leaf. The flowers are larger and more showy than those of 'Gurkha' with an equally powerful fragrance

--The Hillier Manual of Trees & Shrubs (2002, Hillier Nurseries)

    Bookmark   March 30, 2014 at 2:55PM
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