Boomers Calling it Quits

demifloyd(8)April 19, 2012

So, apparently many boomers are leaving the workforce by age sixty-five, even in this poor economy.

Do you think this is a good thing for the economy?

Is it a good thing for younger people looking for employment?

On an individual level, do think it's a good thing that people over sixty five stay in the work force?

I know that when we retired we stayed very busy with more projects, building a home, helping family and volunteering more, and pursuing interests and hobbies. I am busier with more responsibilities than when I worked or was at home rearing children and running the household, just on a more flexible schedule. Retirement these days does not necessarily mean travel trailers and rocking on the porch with lemonade.

Everyone retiree I know, with the exception of the ones in their eighties and nineties, is the same--busier and more engaged, and healthier than ever. It seems some of the "greatest generation" in their late 80s and 90s, for the most part (and certainly not all of them) spend an inordinate amount of time at the doctor's office for various and sundry aches and pains and talking about them.

:/

Of course financial and health considerations are factors in deciding whether to retire or not, but if they aren't, I think over sixty-five can be a fulfilling and particularly rewarding stage of life if one has their health.

Without request anyone to divulge any personal information, how do you feel about retirement and reasons for retirement?

How is, or how do you expect your definition of retirement to affect your quality of life?

Boomers Retiring

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demifloyd(8)

Sorry, link didn't work, here you go:

Boomers Retiring

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 11:43AM
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elvis

Chronologically I'm too young to retire, but it would be nice to do so before Walker something does something even worse to our state retirement system, like turn it into IRA accounts. Never trusted the darned things...

When I do retire: devote more time to Mom, more time to volunteer, raise puppies to sell, more time to garden, work for pay part-time, more weekends camping.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 12:06PM
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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

Wonder what percentage will have to return to the workforce when/if they outlive their savings.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 12:13PM
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mrskjun(9)

Well, I retired, but I'm considering going back to work to get some rest lol. We are raising our now 12 year old grandson, so my dh doesn't see retirement anytime in the near future, though he may be laid off due to privatization. We shall see.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 12:15PM
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lily316(z5PA)

Raising a 12 year old grandson would be a full time plus job, mrsk..lol. I know of what I speak with a 14 year old GS, but thankfully not raising him. I visit and leave.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 12:18PM
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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

It seems some of the "greatest generation" in their late 80s and 90s, for the most part (and certainly not all of them) spend an inordinate amount of time at the doctor's office for various and sundry aches and pains and talking about them.

When you are in your late 80s and 90s - which I hope you live to see - maybe you'll gain better insight into the health problems and concerns of this population. Please take into consideration that pains that are of little concern in younger populations, are taken more seriously by gerontologists and doctors dealing with this oldest demographic.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 12:55PM
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inkognito

I don't know about the US but the UK and Canada are both raising the official retirement age since people, generally speaking live longer.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:03PM
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natal(Louisiana 8b)

Of course financial and health considerations are factors in deciding whether to retire or not

My guess is that would be the majority of people these days. It's not like when our parents retired with pensions and good medical insurance.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:11PM
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demifloyd(8)

When you are in your late 80s and 90s - which I hope you live to see - maybe you'll gain better insight into the health problems and concerns of this population. Please take into consideration that pains that are of little concern in younger populations, are taken more seriously by gerontologists and doctors dealing with this oldest demographic.

*

Nancy, I most certainly DO take into consideration their aches and pains. I watched my Dad die and my mother is in pain every day.

My point is that for so many, that's about all they seem to be able to talk about. Their worlds become smaller and smaller, and that is the primary topic of conversation.

Of course I know a ninety-four year old lady that walks miles every day, is still beautiful with sparkling blue eyes, and my almost ninety-one year old father in law walks every day and today is driving an hour and a half to the family farm, after loading up a tractor on a trailer, and he will mow the old home place, load it back, and drive back home.

Not everyone--but certainly many seniors, become mired in complaining.

Many of us live with pain and handicaps every day, and do not feel a need to remind everyone.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:17PM
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natal(Louisiana 8b)

Wow! Tell me again about your compassion for others.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:31PM
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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

My point is that for so many, that's about all they seem to be able to talk about. Their worlds become smaller and smaller, and that is the primary topic of conversation.

Worlds become smaller and smaller due to declining physical abilities, and declining physical health. Many people, of all ages, talk mostly about their day-to-day lives; when their lives become smaller, the conversation becomes smaller. I would not discount the need to have someone 'hear them' and acknowledge and sympathize with their current reduced condition.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:34PM
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hamiltongardener(CAN 6a)

Natal and Nancy, if I may stick my neck out again...

I think what Demi is trying to say (perhaps a bit clumsily) is that keeping a senior citizen active and engaged in spite of their aches and pains can go a long way to helping their pain.

We know that depression can cause physical symptoms of aches and pains and it does become very easy for someone with an ache to withdraw, to stop moving, contributing to isolation and depression... causing more aches and pains. A vicious cycle.

I don't think Demi was being unsympathetic about the pains that seniors can live with, just advocating a "positive attitude" in dealing with the pain.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:44PM
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demifloyd(8)

Posted by natal Louisiana 8b (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 19, 12 at 13:31

Wow! Tell me again about your compassion for others.

*

I do have compassion. I just happen to think that after asking about how one is feeling and making sure you've done all you can for them, that after an hour or so some other topics could be discussed.

Nancy, absolutely people need to be heard and made to feel important. That's why I invite older people to my home and make them special lunches with salads in antique jello molds like they used to do when they were young and starched napkins folded in the shape of a bird. That's why I invite them to come up, spend a night in my guest room and wait on them hand and foot and make them feel special. That's why I take my old schoolteachers roses and bring them back gifts from overseas. That's why I call and patiently LISTEN to them complain for a long time because I KNOW they don't have many people that want to hear it.

But none of that negates the fact that many people become mired in their own circumstances and it's a sad thing to see productive, interesting people become nothing but a myopic medical update.

I should have known there'd be a way to make Demi the Bad Guy in all of this--congratulations--Good Job!

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:47PM
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Brushworks Spectacular Finishes(5)

My week.

On Monday, I purchased two 40lb LP tanks for the emergency generator. The salesman, Herb, is 67.

On Tuesday, I made some changes to variable annuities. My CFP, Ralph, is 75.

On Tuesday evening we had dinner at a new Italian diner. The new owners are 62.

This morning I had breakfast with a new tenant. He's a Mechanical Engineer (Tool Design). He's 65.

This afternoon I visited the Decor store to have some vertical blinds custom sized. Sue did an excellent job. A perfect fit. She is 62.

None of the above are considering calling it quits anytime soon. Neither am I. I have too much to give and so much to miss out on by not being productive and participating in the workforce.

Besides that, I have obligations to my grandchildren, specifically my autistic granddaughter.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:48PM
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demifloyd(8)

THANK YOU HAMILTONGARDENER, exactly.
I think my last post indicates this, or at least I tried.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:48PM
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natal(Louisiana 8b)

I think what Demi is trying to say (perhaps a bit clumsily) is that keeping a senior citizen active and engaged in spite of their aches and pains can go a long way to helping their pain.

My mom lived to 92. She continued to be active (as best she could ... it sure as hell wasn't easy) with all of her aches and pains until a massive stroke took all of that away. There was rarely a conversation between us where her health wasn't discussed. I never begrudged her that. I wish to God those conversations were still possible.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 1:57PM
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demifloyd(8)

Posted by natal Louisiana 8b (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 19, 12 at 13:57

My mom lived to 92. She continued to be active (as best she could ... it sure as hell wasn't easy) with all of her aches and pains until a massive stroke took all of that away. There was rarely a conversation between us where her health wasn't discussed. I never begrudged her that. I wish to God those conversations were still possible.

*

Yea, I know all about that Natal.

I wish my husband had the more than thirty more years your mother enjoyed that he didn't. I wish he was here so I could fuss at him about forgetting to move my shiny teakettle and splattering grease on it when he cooked.

The fact of the matter is we miss everything about our loved ones when they're gone, but the fact remains they aren't perfect and while there's nothing wrong and everything understandable about discussing what is the focus of one's life at any particular time, going on and on about health issues isn't good for anyone.

Noting that isn't a crime or a lack of compassion.

Some old people complain a lot, whether we love them or miss them.

You aren't in a position to teach me anything about missing anyone, or compassion.

I am sorry that you miss your mother.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 2:15PM
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labrea_gw

The one I know who have jumped ship were for the most part let go by their companies but asked to stay on as free lancers without vacation bens or lives. So yeah I know a couple who have left the SYSTEM earlyish. That secondary underground economy grows larger every year. Lots of barter, street selling, services for cash only along with small part time jobs plus SS old hippies never die they just find new ways of getting under the radar.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 2:22PM
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hamiltongardener(CAN 6a)

I have a co-worker who is leaving the workforce at the end of next week.

She turned 65 in Feb and she considered working for a couple more years but decided to spend more time with the grandkids instead.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 2:27PM
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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

We know that depression can cause physical symptoms of aches and pains and it does become very easy for someone with an ache to withdraw, to stop moving, contributing to isolation and depression... causing more aches and pains. A vicious cycle.

I understand, and I also understand that a number of doctors chalk it up to being old and in one's final years, as in the case of my mother.

There must be help and resources for the aged to call upon to exit the cycle, and many times they are lacking. You're also looking at a generation where women did not necessarily work outside home, and were not responsible for decision making; men were not expected to do domestic activities if they were married (outside of mowing the lawn and raking leaves, and maybe not even that). Many are depressed due to facing declining health and/or finances as a widow/widower, perhaps with children residing too far away to help navigating the traps that contribute to depression. And there is much reason to be depressed in these circumstances. A certain level of physical and mental ability is required to strive to break the cycle of isolation and depression, and that may be lacking as well. One's financial resources can contribute to the isolation as well. All too often, it is not possible to escape due to specific circumstances, and the individual's personality.

As far as individual personality, it took no genius to know that my widowed uncle would not deal well with age-related illness, and reduced finances. Or that my great uncle would deal with it well. One was self-centered, and the other was not.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 2:52PM
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duluthinbloomz4

Most of my group retired at first opportunity. Several of us worked for the same company and were elegible when age and years of service equalled 80. Having started right out of college, I hit the magic 80 when I was 55. You could take your health benefits and pension, or just the health letting the pension sit until some later time. I never looked back; was never sorry to retire even though I did love my job for those 30 some years.

Does leaving make room for someone younger? That's debatable when companies learned (sometime in the 80's) those left behind could do the work of two or three.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 3:14PM
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esh_ga

I think that people should do what works for them - if they want to keep working, go ahead. If they don't want to and they have the money to retire, do that.

But as someone that is very involved with a volunteer-run organization, I would like to say that I don't know what we'd do without our senior volunteers. They do SO MUCH of the work.

So personally it would be great for seniors to be able to retire (financially) so that they could volunteer their time for the many causes that need them. That would keep them active and involved and would benefit so many causes. In fact if we could get them involved with all the schools, think about how much better off our students would be thanks to their helping hands and brains.

But I would never tell someone that they should stop working if that is what they want to do.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 3:18PM
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jillinnj

When I was in my 20s, my mom announced she was retiring. She was in her early 60s. I tried to talk her out of it. She only worked part time anyway. And I thought if she had nothing to do she would get old faster. She wouldn't listen to me and retired. And I am happy to say that I could not have been more wrong! My dad would say to her that he wished she'd go back to work so she'd have more time. Ha! She was so busy. Always going somewhere on some trip with friends. If you called during the day, there was about 0% chance she'd be home.

My dad retired much later. Probably in his 70s, or so. He only retired because his company (a non profit) was shutting down, so he just retired. He also kept very busy with hobbies.

They are now 89 and 93! They have their health problems but nothing you wouldn't expect given their age. And, yes, demi, their favorite subject to talk about is their doctors! That's ok, I sit patiently and listen. And my brother is a doctor so they like to talk to him about it anyway.

I am in my early 50s. I tell my DH all the time that it's time for me to retire. He's not buying it. I tell him that I'd probably get bored at some point and want to do something eventually, probably part time. I don't know how long it would take me to get bored -- a few weeks, months, years, or maybe never. But, I'm looking forward to the chance to find out! Not going to be for quite a while though.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2012 at 3:26PM
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terrene(5b MA)

I know of situations where people have worked like dogs all their lives, look forward to retirement, travel, etc. and then proceed to drop dead of a heart attack. Or they suffer health problems due to years of poor health habits, or work-related strain that compromises their ability to enjoy later years. No one of us knows how many good years or even days we have left!

I'm in my early 50's and plan to call it quits (more or less) as soon as possible. I've worked hard and been self-sufficient for 30 years now, raised a child alone as head of household for 18, etc. Life has been a perpetual treadmill of work, chores, bills, paperwork, care-taking, cleaning up after others, etc., with a seemingly infinite complexity of detail, and frankly it is a grind.

I am having a "mid-life crisis" of sorts, realizing that health and physical ability will be on a slow decline, and that lo and behold we are mortal and time is finite. I'm feeling an urgent need to re-organize and simplify life so that there is less grind and more enjoyment, and more time to do what I love best, and that would be gardening.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 5:41AM
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tobr24u(z6 RI)

Boomers are going to break the SS, Medicare and Medicaid banks, and a dithering Congress doesn't know how to stop it...

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 6:48AM
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momj47(7A)

It's good. It's time for Boomers to set a new standard for retirement, as we've done for every other stage of life.

I'm ready to retire, but I'm waiting (though not always happily). I can start getting SS next year and still work without penalty, which I'll do, at least part time. My financial manager suggests I work, part time till I'm 68!? My job has taken a turn for the worse, so I'm looking for other opportunities. Most of my friends my age have retired and are encouraging me to, so we can meet for lunch instead of dinner.

I'm looking forward to being able to call my time my own. I have (unexpected) heart disease and a stent placed earlier this year - made me reassess my priorities, and my job is not high on my list any more. I made important lifestyle changes - I need about 25 more years from my heart.

My parents enjoyed their retirement, though it was difficult when my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimers, just after my dad retired. It progressed slowly, so they had some pretty good years initially. No guarantees.

My DD, SIL and grandchildren will be moving in with me this summer, I can't wait. I'm so looking forward to a house full of people again - living alone can be very quiet. I expect they'll keep me busy for years to come. and I've got lots of plans.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 6:55AM
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jodik_gw

I'm with you, there, Terrene! Luckily, part of my work related responsibilities have everything to do with gardening!

At 51, it's my body that won't cooperate, though the memory isn't so great, either! ;-) After so much physical trauma and a disease that I can't control, I've simply learned to do what I can, and let the rest wait until I CAN do it. Life is precious, and time does not wait. So, I have learned to slow down, work at a capacity I can handle, and spend some time enjoying the nature all around me, and my wonderful family and my dear friends. I don't want to miss the important things, like watching my grandchildren grow up, and interacting with my fantastic grown kids!

Sometimes, we simply have to re-prioritize. This is exactly what I've done... what I've basically been forced to do... but it's worked out better than I could imagine. My only complaints are pain, which hurts like the dickens, and that I can't get done what once was a walk in the park!

When life gives us lemons, some people make lemonade... I try to make lemon meringue pie! :-)

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 6:58AM
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lionheart_gw

I'm planning on retiring when I'm 70, but maybe starting my own business when I do. I just keep saving and saving so I can start up a business.

Sometimes it's tempting to think about early retirement. I have a little way to go, but I can see it from here. :-)

It would probably feel like a vacation at first, but then it would probably be terribly boring - just like when I was laid off a few years back.

OTOH, my son and DIL are expecting their first child (and my first grandchild) in August. It's about time. It's a girl! That could change everything. :-)

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 7:21AM
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Brushworks Spectacular Finishes(5)

Richard,

Most workers on SS benefits are still contributing to SS benefits.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2012 at 7:50AM
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