lawn aeration

sorie6(6b ok.)July 20, 2008

My yard is full of weeds and it's in the 90's and 100 here. Can I spray them now and then aerate? Or should I wait till it cools off?

Thanks for your help.

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bpgreen(5UT)

What are you planning to spray with?

If you're planning to spray with a broadleaf herbicide, it's probably too hot. Also, since this is the organic forum, you'll probably get better answers regarding herbicides on the regular Lawn forum

It's definitely too hot to aerate.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2008 at 12:43PM
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stan6

I've been reading about liquid soil conditioners and aerators, like Lazyman and Aerify. They promise a lot. Can anyone verify their value. Can they really replace mechanical aeration?

    Bookmark   July 29, 2008 at 11:39PM
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bpgreen(5UT)

Stan--You might get better results posting a new thread with a subject that more closely describes what you're asking.

I'll take a stab at it. The liquid aerator products like the ones you mentioned (and Nitron and Revive) are primarily surfactants/wetting agents. They don't really aerate the lawn, but they help water penetrate more deeply. They all have other proprietary ingredients (for example, Revive has chelated iron and chelating and sequestering agents to help alkaline soils), but the main thing they do is help water penetrate the soil better. That's one of the things that aeration does, but aeration also makes actual air holes in the soil, and loosens the soil.

I know that many people have posted that they got great results from some of these products. I tried Revive a couple of times. The first time was to see how well it would work and the second time was because it was on sale and was sold in a bag with dehydrated poultry manure. Since it was on sale, it was inexpensive fertilizer.

It seemed to help a little, but I was also transitioning to a more organic lawn care program, so I'm not sure how much of the help was due to the Revive and how much to the increased organic matter in my soil.

I will probably not use one of these again (at least not at this house) because I don't think I need this kind of thing anymore.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2008 at 12:04AM
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Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

sorie6, right now is not the most bestest time to spray for "weed" control, although it you can work in those temperatures now would be a good time to aerate the soil, if it needs it. Mid September would be when you would want to look at "weed" control if it is needed. Since most all annual "weeds" in the grass will be going dormant for the winter about then concentrating on getting the turf grass you have to grow better and thicker wil go a long way toward eliminating the "weeds" than would any control measure since they have most all spread more seeds that will germinate next year when conditions are right.
Right now, if possible, keep the grass well hydrated, mow high, recycle the clippings right where they came from (the grass clippings will provide 1/2 your lawns annual nutrient requirements). Get a good, reliable soil test done if you have not already done that and this fall adjust the soils pH, if necessary, and later feed that turf grass so next spring the grasses will grow up hale and hearty able to compete with the "weeds".
stan6, as bpgreen has stated those liquid "aerators" are simply soap that lessens the surface tension of water so it penetrates better. They do nothing to actually aerate soil. The most bestest way to get soil aerated is to spread compost over the soil to loosen it and while this may take time, and is something that needs to be done at least annually, it is a more permanent solution to compacted soil.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2008 at 7:07AM
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bettyfb

Hi,

For those who do not want to rent an aerator, they carry Manual Core Aerators at Home Depot--They are called Turf Hound, and they cost around $20. I have a 3,000 Sq ft lawn, so it should not take me too long. It does lift out the cores of soil.

Betty

    Bookmark   August 2, 2008 at 3:50PM
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