Steep slope with Poison Ivy problem

jefnifnerfMay 16, 2009

I am a newbie gardener, and I have a very problematic steep slope in my front yard. It is planted with what I believe is pachysandra and vinca minor vines. However, the entire slope is overrun with poison ivy and other invasive weeds. For years we have tried pulling out the poison, but it comes back no matter what we do. We're now thinking of tearing out everything that's planted there and starting over.

Does anyone have advice? Is there some way we could save the groundcover plants and just get rid of all the poison ivy? Or if we do tear everything out, is there a groundcover plant that wouldn't be as easily overrun?

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melissas(z6PA)

I had a poison ivy problem when I moved into my home, and I used Brush B Gone to kill it. I live on a hill, too, and used a lot of grasses to stabilize my back slope, and then planted sedum as a ground cover. I hired a landscape architect to give me a plan for my front slope, and she recommended grasses and shrubs, and then vinca minor for a ground cover. You might want to work on just part of your slope at a time (depending how big it is) so that the whole thing doesn't de-stabilize and wash away. Good luck.

    Bookmark   May 19, 2009 at 8:36AM
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topie

If the area is large, I agree with melissas that you may want to try working on the slope in sections to ensure stability of the slope. This will also make the weed/poison ivy eradication job less overwhelming, and you won't end up with a large bare area of ground to fill in.

If the slope is not extremely steep, you might consider starting a rock garden, or terraced type of garden in this area. This will allow easier access to the slope for you so you can weed out any unwanted plants/weeds that may find their way in.

A rock garden or a terraced garden will also allow you to work in sections that are separated by barriers from the poison ivy, Pachysandra, and Vinca, all of which tend to be aggressive growers.

I would check out the Garden Web's "Hillside Gardening" forum for more ideas on how to plan a garden on a slope at the link below.

Good luck!

Here is a link that might be useful: Garden Web - Hillside gardening

    Bookmark   May 20, 2009 at 3:19AM
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