Polycultures in the vegetable garden

Noel.101(7a)December 24, 2013

I was wondering what custom polycultures people use in their vegetable gardens. I'm planning for next year and looking for inspiration and figure other gardeners may feel the same way. Thanks

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Natures_Nature(5 OH)

I think you cant get more polyculture than transplanting native weeds in your garden. There are several wild medicinal herbs that I plant in the garden(yellow dock, burdock, plantain, dandelion,etc). These plants are powerful medicine, just like the rest of the garden, but these herbs are a notch above vegetables, medicine wise.

Even just living next to the woods or any natural ecosystem can be considered polyculture.

Nearly all home gardens are polycultures.

    Bookmark   December 28, 2013 at 1:04PM
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BeeKind12(6b)

Polycultures depend upon what your needs are. Don't grow something if you are not going to use it somewhere useful. If you are looking for ready-made lists of polyculture plants to grow, that also depends upon which growing zone you are in, growing conditions such as yearly rainfall amount, as well as whether you prefer forest polycultures to open ones. There are a lot of variables within the term.

If searching for companion plantings, however, there are a plethora of lists found all over the internet. Use them. But it might benefit you tremendously to do some further research into polycultures first before planting anything permanent. Here are a few websites you could gain additional insight from:

http://www.permies.com/
http://www.rootsimple.com/2006/12/polyculture/
http://www.backyardabundance.org/Portals/0/p/Handout-PolyculturePlantingGuide.pdf

    Bookmark   June 11, 2014 at 12:43PM
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Noel.101(7a)

All set. Thanks

    Bookmark   June 16, 2014 at 9:02PM
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greenman62

i love the fact that dandelion, dock, and evening of primrose all decided to fill up and area i had left open....
i was waiting to plant a couple of papaya trees, and conditioned the ground first, leaving it for a month.

i had added a lot of coffee grounds grass clippings and compost, and mixed it in, raising the the bed a few inches above level.

i wanted to wait a month for it to warm up, and for it all to break down before planting.

i added just one papaya, and left the rest of the area for local weeds to come in. glad i did, ,there is so much wildlife - bugs, lizards, dragonflies etc... it increased the insect and lizard population 10 fold in my yard

    Bookmark   June 16, 2014 at 11:48PM
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jonathanpassey(Utah z5)

I hate to be a pest, but, dandelion is not native to North America.

JP

    Bookmark   June 19, 2014 at 7:13PM
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greenman62

Well, i think thats debatable
but even if they came on the Mayflower,
i think they have been here long enough for the local fauna to adapt to their presence
---
But before the arrival of Europeans, there were already dandelions in North America
. In Alaska there are dandelion fossils over 100,000 years old,

http://nhgardensolutions.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/the-dandelion-debate/

1 Like    Bookmark   June 20, 2014 at 7:35AM
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