Lemoine's Disease

lactifloralunaticSeptember 21, 2009

I have recently been involved with a peony disease called Lemoine's Disease. I am wondering if any of you have experience with or information about this disease. Here's what I already know/think I know:

-Lemoine's Disease is suspected to be caused by a virus

-There is no cure - peonies must be dug and destroyed

-symptoms include dwarfed and spindly foliage, lack of flowers, and compact, knobby roots

-Disease is only transferrable via sap - cutting tools, shovels, etc.

Thanks!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur01

Part correct but part wrong. Not always dwarfed etc. and not only transferrable via sap. If you have the desease you should not plant peonies in the area.

Alice Harding lactiflora has Lemoine's but is a full vigorous plant with huge flowers.

Suggest contact Don Hollingsworth at www.nursery@hpeonies.com with a description of you plants. It sounds more like an advanced Root Knot nematode problem.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2009 at 12:24AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lactifloralunatic

Thanks for the response maifleur! What other ways can this disease be transferred besides through sap?

    Bookmark   September 23, 2009 at 3:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
peonyman(Zone 5, Lawrence, Ks)

Lactiflorallunatic,

I think Maifluer was referring to the transfer of Lemoines via root contact. The roots can cross underground in very close contact and the virus actually move from plant to plant.

One of the most common ways to transfer the disease is in the spring when you disbud to get larger blooms. It is advisable to sanitize your pruning sheers or knife before moving on the next plant when you are clipping off the side buds. You can just carry a bottle of rubbing alcohol and a paper towel to wipe the knife or pruner blade surface.

The tell-tell sign of Lemoine's disease is enlarged areas on the roots of the peony. The enlargements will only be on older primary and secondary roots but not on the feeder roots. Root knot nematode will show up with small pearls on the feeder roots. It also can also cause the secondary storage roots to have enlargements on them similar to Lemoine's. Lemoine's disease does not have the small root galls on the feeder roots.

A plant with root know nematode can be cured by dividing and removing all feeder roots and cutting the primary root back to 6-8 inches. Plant in a different non-infected area. If you have Lemoines then you need to destroy the plant and hope you have not spread it.

Lets change the subject. Talking about Lemoine's will give me insomnia.

Leon

    Bookmark   September 27, 2009 at 6:13PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur01

Sort of Leon but not quite. Although it is not as wide spread as it was at one time. Some of my reading leads me to suggest that the disease may stay in the soil for some time. Part but not all of the disease remaining in the soil is because of the composting of the root fibers left in the soil. Since peonies are not the only thing effected by Lemoines leaving that area fallow for a number of years is probably a wise idea. Lemoine's also will so as braided fibers within the root not necessary only in the enlarged areas.

The description line 3 leads me to believe that the OP may not have lemoine's but root galls of the type seen in the brassia family which show as a clubed root. Sometimes caused by a mineral imbalance. But Don with his experience would be able to make some better suggestions.

    Bookmark   September 27, 2009 at 10:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur01

Sort of Leon but not quite. Although it is not as wide spread as it was at one time. Some of my reading leads me to suggest that the disease may stay in the soil for some time. Part but not all of the disease remaining in the soil is because of the composting of the root fibers left in the soil. Since peonies are not the only thing effected by Lemoines leaving that area fallow for a number of years is probably a wise idea. Lemoine's also will so as braided fibers within the root not necessary only in the enlarged areas.

The description line 3 leads me to believe that the OP may not have lemoine's but root galls of the type seen in the brassia family which show as a clubed root. Sometimes caused by a mineral imbalance. But Don with his experience would be able to make some better suggestions.

    Bookmark   September 27, 2009 at 10:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mamecmh61

I have had my beautiful peonies growing in my yard for 50 years. Last year for the first time they developed white spots on the leaves and then the leaves turned white. I thought it was because we had such a rainy spring. But this year they seem to be doing the same thing. Please help....I loved those peonies.

    Bookmark   May 24, 2010 at 12:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
amulet(7b NC)

mamecmh61,

What zone are you in? How much air circulation do these peonies get? It sounds like you may have powdery mildew.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2010 at 1:14PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Mulching peonies with limestone chips
Does anyone mulch their peonies with limestone chips...
enith
I bought peony seeds, now what?
I bought two different types of peony seeds-I wasn't...
polypeptide
Sinking peonies
Most of my peonies are in raised beds, which over the...
calistoga_al
Herbacious peony growing with tree peony
I have a tree peony in my garden that is 4/5 yrs old...
raptor1
Adelman's Itoh Offerings for 2015
Has anyone seen Adelman's new peony catalog yet? They...
lizbest1
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™