Zone 7 Palms

iain42May 8, 2007

What Palms can I grow in Zone 7 that are winter hardy other than windmills?

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donray(7b Texas)

Trachy Takil, Latisectus and Waggies. Mediterranean,Pindo,Sabal minor,Sabal Palmetto?Pushing the zone you can try Washy Filifera, Filibusta and Robusta with some protection. Just a few I grow.

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 5:14PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

In other words, all the ugly ones. :-)

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 6:30PM
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xerophyte_nyc(7)

ROFLMAO!

couldn't have said it any better o-dude

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 7:38PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Thank you, I usually get into alot of trouble when I say that around here. LMAO, I am glad you like it. :-)

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 9:28PM
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austinl(Little Rock, AR, 8a)

What city are you located? Here in the suburbs of Little Rock, I've been growing windmills of all sizes from seedlings to 6 foot ones. The seedlings get spear pull when young but always recover. The larger ones have no problems at all. I also have a robusta that I cover with a tarp for the winter with no heat after cutting all the fronds. It produces a full crown by late May. I also have a butia/pindo palm but it's a little more tender and gets some damage each winter but nothing too devastating. Of course, sabal minor and louisianas are fool proof here. I hope this helps. Go Razorbacks! :)

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 10:42PM
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iain42

LOL that was going to be my next question regarding looks.

I guess my next stop is to see if there is a tropical part of the forum. I am planting elephant ears Bamboo and Banana Trees that are cold hardy.

I would like to find tall trees that look tropical but are cold hardy in zone 7.

Thanks again for the response.

    Bookmark   May 8, 2007 at 10:42PM
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josh_palm_crazy

orchiddude Ive seen a pic of your palms and they are beautiful but BE NICE! lol! I wish I could grow some non-ugly palms here but I dont have a greenhouse. You know I never thought of it before but when I saw your follow up I realized by compairison, yeah those are the ugly ones. Although I dont think a Pindo is "ugly". but again nice palms orchiddude.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 1:02AM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Thank you Josh. I dont mean to be ugly and really I only speak for myself. I know the ugly ones have a place in this world just not in my pots. :-) I have a little theory, if you live in a zone that can not support a palm in the ground, but you can grow in a pot, then go ahead and get something you really want and something that looks pretty. After all, if I am going to put alot of working into this adventure anyway, I might as well have something that looks good. Really its not alot of work, just moving them 2 times a year. I am getting worried that I might need a folk lift in a few years. :-)

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 7:35AM
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Dave in NoVA • 7a • Northern VA

I'm surprised no one mentioned the Needle Palm. They are among the most hardy -- right there next to S. minor. As to attractiveness of hardy palms, I think it depends on the setting and culture. I've seen some real nice-looking shrubby needle palms. They have a nice bright green color. I've seen some real attractive Windmills planted in groups of three of varying sizes with some nice contrasting underplantings. No, probably a lone palm in the middle of the yard - no matter what species it is, will look rather dull.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 7:56AM
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topher2006

Iain
Where in ar are you ?
I live in Camden and grow many types of palms
I have pindos , windmills , robustas and a sago
in the ground... I have many diffrient types in pots
on my deck don't just limit yourself to ground plants because there's not many choices oh and by the way welcome to the forum good to see another arkansan here !

Orchiddude

I agree you are going to need a "folklift " to get all these fan palm folks out of your face ! lol........

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 8:12AM
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xerophyte_nyc(7)

It's funny how most garden hobbyists tend to prefer plants that do not grow in there climate, it's normal.

In England, they enthusiastically cultivate native american plants that most here would consider to be weeds.

There are many bonsai enthusiasts in warm climates that go through great lengths to give non-native species like maples a refrigerated winter dormancy.

And we have zone-pushers here trying all sorts of stuff to grow plants that wouldn't survive otherwise.

x

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 9:33AM
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the_virginian(Zone 7 NoVA)

No palm is ugly if it is well trimmed and planted in a nice area in the garden.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 11:34AM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

LMAO topher... your right!

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 7:50PM
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bradleyo_gw

I used to think that non-trunking palms weren't so good looking until I learned that I can grow them here, and I think trachys are beautiful. Being without a greenhouse, I'm limited to the plants I can grow here. I only dream of being in a 7b climate, I'd have trachys, needles and minors growing everywhere, in addition to palms growing in the ground with which I would provide adequate protection like washies, phoenix, chams, sabals, maybe even some dypsis, and any other small understory palms that MAY survive. I would also have ample tropicals IF and when I have a greenhouse. But I wouldn't call any of them ugly. The only ugly plants to me are weeds or other things which come up in my various beds which are out of place.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 9:23PM
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xerophyte_nyc(7)

Almost any plant or tree has its merits, and can be esthetically pleasing if presented in a tasteful manner. I've seen the photos on this forum and there are many beautiful trees to admire...

But, if you were to show an average person a bunch of different palms, and asked them to pick out their favorite, I doubt that the Zone 6/7 cold-hardy palms would rank high.

Just my opinion. FWIW, I am growing a Sabal minor among other things.

x

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 9:37PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

UGLY UGLY UGLY GULY LGYU YGUL GUYL......lol

I am sorry. I dont mean to step on anyones needle palm or Sabal minor. I mean if one where to start growing in my yard, I promise I wouldnt kill it, I would just dig it up and give it to one of you guys. Like if one of you guys were to like get a spindle or a bottle palm and figure it was too pretty for your yard in zone 4 and wanted to get a needle instead, I would surely hope that you would send it my way. Right, we can trade right? :-)

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 10:29PM
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williamr

Not to be off topic, but I am one of those reverse zone pushers as I have five bonsai that I put in the fridge every winter, and believe it or not it works great. I also have a large palm collection.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2007 at 10:46PM
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jeff_w(z8 VA)

I live in an area that hasn't seen below 10 F in a few years. I can grow sabal minors, xtexensis, and trachys with no cold damage, and butias, chamaerops, serenoas with some damage. Others I've overwintered alive with pathetic results: filifera, livistona, jubaea straplings, chamaedorea microspadix come to mind. With protection, I've managed phoenix canariensis this winter and 10 F. One looks good, one terrible. I've managed butiagrus and dypsis decipiens with even more protection. Next winter, I'm building a stronger greenhouse than my failure 2 years ago. I am planting queens this years.

By the way, I've also probably killed more palms than anyone reading this. How much are you willing to sacrifice to find what works?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2007 at 1:01AM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Jeff...I found what works for me. Pots big pots and bigger pots and even bigger pots. I havent lost any palms other than the 2 king palms I forgot to water during the winter. They were so little and got lost, and then before you know it they were dried up.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2007 at 7:23AM
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topher2006

It's called common sense no i'm not degrading anyone here i am just saying you put a tropical plant in the ground
that's not cold hardy what do you expect ?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2007 at 7:36AM
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donray(7b Texas)

Same as you perhaps? 6 months ago.
Click the link.

Here is a link that might be useful: Majesty

    Bookmark   May 10, 2007 at 6:49PM
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topher2006

Donray
In that post it does say i knew
better when i did it did you miss that part ?

I also said i wasn't trying to critisize any one and i realy wasn't....

    Bookmark   May 11, 2007 at 10:05AM
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novascotian(Halifax z6a/b)

It is really rewarding to grow a palm tree outside, even if covered in the winter. Its totally fun and it is something to brag about too. :)

    Bookmark   May 11, 2007 at 1:30PM
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josh_palm_crazy

Im new at this but AMEN!

    Bookmark   May 11, 2007 at 1:42PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

I might add, whether in a pot or dry land, its also rewarding when you grow them up from a little bitty thing to a big plant.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2007 at 2:18PM
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topher2006

Yes i agree it is real rewarding !

I love it !

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 10:24PM
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timintexas(z8 E.Tx.)

Funny thing about "ugly" cold hardy palms..I, of course, live in Texas and grow all the cold hardy ones. I have been living out of the country for a couple years in the Cayman Islands. You know what? After the thrill is gone from the coconuts ect...those jaunty little cold hardy palms start to look really good. No lie. I was so happy to get back to my ugly palms. The beauty and scale is just right for a yard. You know what one of my fav's is? S. Minor---you should see how stunning they can become with good care and culture. A single leaf with a 6 foot span and that blueish green color is so soothing in a shady garden.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2007 at 7:48PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

timh....I am sorry you had to leave the lush tropics and have to come back to....just joking. Its the other way around for most of us. I would rather have the coconut view any day of the year, yes, it might get old after a while but boy it would be nice for the first 5 or 10 years.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2007 at 8:43PM
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topher2006

Oh yeah sitting by the seaside underneath a grove of coconut trees cool drink terrible just terrible !

I would much rather be here hauling my palms in and out every winter !

    Bookmark   May 15, 2007 at 11:06AM
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timintexas(z8 E.Tx.)

Trust me...it would seem the tropics (at least the islands) would be amazing but what you actually find is that is there is not a whole lot of variety growing there. Endless Cocnuts, Christmas, foxtail and Royals...thats about it. You begin to crave seeing a nice, GREEN lawn, flowers other than tired old hibiscus and a few others. The only thing I found intersting were Causerina trees..the pines that grow right on the beach. It took a grand total of about 6 weeks for it to all wear off. Blah....
I managed a nursery there in the islands. Same old crap you find at Lowes you find there, just costs a lot more and it never does very well. NOT a garden paradise. If someone would have told me this a few years ago, I would never have believed them. Even South Florida grows old...tried that too. The deep South is the place to be...sometimes you have to leave to realize what you left. Does that make any sense?
Now, I am from Chicago- THAT is some place I never want to go again! ha ha. One of the reasons I love living in Zone 8 is that in my yard I have peaches, tangerines, apples, figs ect. all in the same yard. That, to me, is amazing. The best of both worlds. I enjoy my palms along with flowers I grew up with in the North! BTW...I am just barely in Zone 8, close to 7.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2007 at 10:07PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

I understand Timh. I like my zone alot, I would like it to be a little warmer longer in the year, at least a zone 8 or 9. As long as I have a greenhouse, I can pretty much grow anything here. I do wish I could grow Royals in the yard. I am hoping they breed a palm that looks as good as a royal but can be grown in zone 6. That would be cool.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2007 at 11:10PM
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blondboy47(z6b(almost 7) ON,Canada)

One almost wonders, with all the genetic things scientists are doing these days, why someone can't genetically mix some palm with something like a pine that would be cold hardy to like zone 4. Who knows. Maybe one day.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2007 at 6:37PM
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xerophyte_nyc(7)

A palm-pine hybrid would be quite a feat - mixing a monocot (angiosperm) with a conifer (gymnosperm)? Sounds like sci-fi.

More likely (but probably just as unrealistic) would be to isolate the genetics responsible for synthesis of "anti-freeze" compounds within the plant fluids of cold-hardy plants, and splice them into palm embryos using a viral vector. Problem is who the heck would fund such a project, which has no real value to our society.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2007 at 10:46PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Well, like everything else. If the palm growers could make a new plant, they could sell it all over the world.

    Bookmark   May 19, 2007 at 6:42AM
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xerophyte_nyc(7)

they could sell it, but would there be buyers other than palm freaks like us? and the price would be at a premium, so you have to wonder...Look at something like Musa basjoo, a cold-hardy banana, easy to find, cheap - sales haven't exactly taken off, the general public is unaware for the most part.

For now, we drag bigger and bigger pots. Soon some of us might have to make holes in our ceilings to fit some palms!

    Bookmark   May 19, 2007 at 7:47AM
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tropicalchuck

I'm looking on some good advice on prepairing my outdoor cold hardy palms for the winter. I live in zone 7 and would like some advice? Also an inexpensive and decent way to build a greenhouse? Help? You can email me at chucksewell@msn.com,, Thanks

    Bookmark   May 19, 2007 at 11:17PM
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cfkingfish(10 SWFL)

I live in an essentially frost free climate where my limitations on what I can grow are not much, but one of the most sought after palms in my book is Chamaerops humilis var. Vulcano. It is more dwarfed with barely segmented leaves and has a very "tough" appearance to it. It is cold hardy as hell!

    Bookmark   May 20, 2007 at 10:16AM
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nucci60(6 Ma.)

orchiddude, you are anti palmate.LOL

    Bookmark   May 20, 2007 at 10:21PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Now nucci60, you know I dont like the ugly ones. I cant help it. I dont like them. I dont want any. If I am going to grow a palm and put that much into it, I want a pretty one that people will talk about and ask where I got it and want to buy it from me etc...

That reminds me, we had a yard sale once and I had a triangle palm sitting on the patio. I swear everyone wanted the plant, they didnt care for the stuff we were selling, all they wanted to do was talk about the palm. You know the blueish color I guess made them look. Anyway, I guess they thought I would sell for yard sell prices. LOL

So I guess to answer your guestion, yes I am.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2007 at 10:35PM
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southern_il_boy(6B)

I have to agree with timh. I lived in south Florida years ago and it gets old. To me, it's more interesting to be driving a country road in southern IL and seeing someone with a trachy in their front yard. Or wild sabal minors in the bottom lands. Just this morning I was driving to work in St. Louis and glanced at a home on the hiway frontage road and saw 2 large queen palms. They of course will have to be moved or heavily protected come winter, but man was I surprised to see them. I'm going to take pictures tonight on my way home. Anyway, its fun to see the great lengths people will go to have unusual plants in their yard.

    Bookmark   July 2, 2007 at 4:01PM
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melissa_thefarm(NItaly)

Why do I get the impression that everyone who has participated in this thread up to now has been male? Am I mistaken? Or is tropical plant zone denial a guy kind of thing? Just curious.

I'm looking into hardy palms myself, while suffering under the additional handicap (as I think it is) of alkaline clay soil, so the whole project is a challenge. And I am not inclined to coddle my plants. I'm currently on vacation in my home state of Florida (in north Florida) where Sabal palms are native, and I think they're quite handsome. Trachycarpus fortunei is the one palm which is widely grown where I live, I suspect for the most part in alluvial soils, and it's a surprising palm for a Floridian until you get used to it. Now I like it. It has its own character. I think it might do very well in creating a temperate rainforest kind of ambience, which unfortately my land doesn't lend itself to. I don't think I've ever seen a healthy palm that I thought was ugly.

Melissa

    Bookmark   July 2, 2007 at 7:55PM
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alex_7b(7b/8a)

Melissa,
It's typical that those in zone_denial are more commonly men. Not to say all - we have women in our palm society too.

Southern IL boy,
I agree. I have told my wife that a couple hours into SoFL is enough. Incredibly, you get tired of too many palms, especially when they're unkept. I LOVE to find palms in places I don't expect. If I drive into z7a and someone has a live oak w/S.minor underneath, I'm thrilled.

    Bookmark   July 2, 2007 at 8:44PM
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subtropix

Corny as it sounds, beauty is really in the eye of the beholder. Personally, I love the look of subtropical gardens and plants. Living in a a zone 7 or 8 gives you the possibility of growing plants at both ends of the climate zone thus increasing the number of species that may be grown (especially if the gardener is sensitive to microclimate variations). Aesthetically, I happen to like the look of the more palmate palms--though I collect the feather ones as well. Sometimes, I think ugliness judgements are just based on how common some plants are. Take Washingtonias for example. They are one of the few species of native American palms, grow incredibily fast, are extremely robust, drought and heat tolerant, yet many palm enthusiasts HATE them. If they were slow growers from some place "exotic", finicky, rare and expensive every palm nut (no pun intended) would be trying to obtain one. Similary, another native American, the Sabals, are terrific palms. They're an ancient genus of palms that are robust, and cold hardy. Those enormous blue-green leaves are also gorgeous. True, most are incredibly SLOW growers. As for beauty (or ugliness) of South Florida, just keep in mind that it has been so completely changed by mankind, that it bears NO resemblance to its native past. The modern look of South Florida and its dominance by palms was created by man (mostly transplanted northerners).

    Bookmark   July 3, 2007 at 8:12AM
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alex_7b(7b/8a)

NJOasis,

I think I just get saturated on them in the MIA area when people don't care for them.

As for Washingtonia, I can understand folks in LAX hating them. They shine however, when you get to PHX; they absolutely thrive on the heat of the desert and generally are not trimmed so much.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2007 at 12:15PM
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topher2006

Correct me if i'm wrong but sabal palmettos are not native to florida are they ?

    Bookmark   July 3, 2007 at 3:28PM
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topher2006

Disregard that stupid question !

    Bookmark   July 3, 2007 at 4:46PM
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juni_perez(6a)

I posted this elsewhere and will post it here too. This palm is growing in zone 6a... it's not a fan palm, the pic was after sun stopped shining on that spot, so it's in shade now and doesn't look as beautiful as it does when you see it with your own eyes:

If that is in Rochester, NY, you can do better in your zone!

    Bookmark   June 11, 2008 at 9:30PM
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alexnjzone7

^That Palm is a Butia, probably capitata. Thats encouraging for me, as I am growing one in South Jersey which would be 7a/b. Maybe I'll get some pics. (it looks great after 4 days of 100 degrees)

    Bookmark   June 11, 2008 at 10:21PM
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NoVaPlantGuy_Z7b_8a(Alexandria, VA 7B/8A)

How long has that Butia been growing there? Does it stay outside all winter? or is it a seasonally "moved" palm? If it stays there, what kind of protection, if any, does it get during winter? I find it pretty hard to belive that that palm stays there year round, let alone w/ no protection. Butia Capiata is a very, probably THE most cold hardy pinnate palm, but the farthest north I have seen them growing with no protection is Va Beach, VA. That area also looks very open, unprotected, and not much like there could be much of a microclimate either. Im very interested in more details about this palm, its history..etc. Thanks!

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 12:07AM
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jimhardy

Without some history on this palm it is basically like the spaceship in my backyard!Would you like to see a picture of it?

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 3:47AM
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Central_Cali369(Sunset Z9, Fresno, CA)

That photo looks kind of fishy. I did a bit of research on Highland Park in Monroe County and I didn't find a single website that talked about the palm. They talked about tulips, pansies, lilacs....but no palms. I did find that they have a Butia-looking palm in the Lamberton Conservatory at Highland Park, but that one is indoors.

The palm is barely visible on the left side of this photo:
http://www.inforochester.com/Lamberton.htm

And here it is on the right side:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sieger/2375781892/

I also found a photo of the same Highland Park sign as above, and although it is from a different angle, there is not sign of a butia behind the sign. Here's the pic:
http://www.waymarking.com/gallery/image.aspx?f=1&guid=66de7881-79f4-4081-a11a-8ca23def89e4&gid=3

I think that image was photoshopped. Just what i could dig up with 5 minutes of searching on google.

    Bookmark   June 19, 2008 at 4:00PM
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NoVaPlantGuy_Z7b_8a(Alexandria, VA 7B/8A)

Well I guess the poster that posted that pic is not going to return to give us any history on that palm. Geee.. im SHOCKED. *rolls eyes*. Even if that palm was there for a time, it just cant be there permanently. IF they can grow those in Rochester with little to no protection, then the National Mall here in Washington, D.C. should be lined with Sable Palmettos by now.

The photo does look somewhat fishy also upon closer inspection. I see some inconsistencies in it.

In the 2nd pic of that sign its hard to tell anything. It appears to be from the same angle, but theres really no point of common reference between the two photos. I did notice a conservatory in the background, maybe they house palms in there and move them outdoors during summer? Maybe there is a way we could find out and end this apparent mystery! haha!

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 12:10AM
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josh_palm_crazy

I posted this on another thread earlier.

The palm was probably put in this spring. I just did a search for the area on Windows Live Search and found this picture. I've circled the area where the palm would be behind the Highland Park sign and its just an empty bed. BTW It looks like a Mule Palm X Butiagrus nabonnandii. Thats one expensive annual. LOL!

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 1:02AM
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jimhardy

Pretty cool Jay,I guess I better beat you to any google pics of my backyard that don't have a spaceship in them and photoshop them in.lol

    Bookmark   June 20, 2008 at 1:10AM
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nucci60(6 Ma.)

Butia in Rochester? Sounds like the lady growing them in zone 4, only she protects them.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2008 at 10:12AM
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juni_perez(6a)

Hi Everyone.

Sorry I haven't gotten back at anyone lately, we're preparing for the PR Festival here in Rochester (I'm the webmaster and they have a lot of updates), I also help with tech support for Marc Anthony Fanclub (he's on tour and that means site overload and a lot of tech support for the fans) and a few other things I'm involved in. So I'm very busy.

The palm tree is a Butia Capitata, apparently - some tell me might be crossbred. I haven't gotten a hold of anyone at the park yet who can tell me about it, but it IS there. I've ordered two off of eBay today (5 gallons each @ $24.95 shipping included).

The picture looks weird cause it's a cellphone shot. It looks fishy, but no editing whatsoever. All you scheptics need to calm down. It's there. I tried getting a satellite shot and got the same empty space as Josh posted. So I agree it's a recent planting. More and more people here in Rochester are finding out - I guess I'm not the only one who almost crashed when he drove by and saw it. I'm starting to hear that same story from a few folks. It's very exciting to me. We're just a zone 6!!!

I'll try to get better pics with my digital camera - my phone takes 2MP shots and it looks bad... I'll even take video shots so that no one says I photoshopped it! In fact, I think I have some spare time this afternoon and it's nice and sunny!

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 4:45PM
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juni_perez(6a)

Okay, I'm back. Here are the pictures I took today followed by a video. I did notice a small ring around the base of the palm, but I was told that was to help stop water from running off and direct it down the roots. I don't know.

There was a photographer there taking pictures of it, but he wasn't too friendly and didn't seem to like my questions. :(

Here's a link to the video:

Here is a link that might be useful: Highland Palm video (MySpace Video)

    Bookmark   June 22, 2008 at 7:01PM
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barco

They must move it inside every year....and the Google image is the wrong season.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 4:16PM
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gardenguy_(z6b PA)

WITH REGARDS TO xerophyte_nyc's post.....

-----------------------------------------------------------
It's funny how most garden hobbyists tend to prefer plants that do not grow in there climate, it's normal.
In England, they enthusiastically cultivate native american plants that most here would consider to be weeds.

There are many bonsai enthusiasts in warm climates that go through great lengths to give non-native species like maples a refrigerated winter dormancy.

And we have zone-pushers here trying all sorts of stuff to grow plants that wouldn't survive otherwise.
-----------------------------------------------------------

I think I'm guilty of that myself. Here in Western Pa. I have Bananas ( I even got fruit!), a sago and a few other varieties of Palms. The palms are in pots and as soon as the wife gets back from her trip with the digi-cam, I want to take some pics of the palms I have so that some of you can identify them for me. As for the weather, I can't stress enough how much I hate living in a zone that routinely gets frosts and hard freezes. I like hot humid climates with plenty of rain fall. I'd move, but I don't want to force my wife to, as she has her job and family here, so I just suck it up.

BTW xerophyte, how in the world would someone who lives in a very warm climate or one that doesn't have cold weather give a maple tree winter dormancy, esp if it's fully grown tree?

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 8:07PM
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NoVaPlantGuy_Z7b_8a(Alexandria, VA 7B/8A)

In regards to the palm in Rochester:

Ok, I believe its there now, but I also believe that that palm is moved every year to an indoor location. There just is no way a Butia Capiata can grow outdoors that far north. We cant even grow those here ( at least not without heavy protection) and in our urban heat island were about a cold zone 8a. We do have micro climates that approach a zone 8b here, but still.

*****

In regards to maples and such growing in warm climates: If maples can be grown in Florida, there is no reason in the world why they can't be grown in England's climate. I know there are plenty of maples in Florida, because I have seen them first hand, even in south Florida. They do go through a dormancy period. Dormancy periods are more triggered by daylight hours change, and sun angle change , than they are by temperature change. Even though many of the maples I have seen in Florida retained at least 1/2 to 2/3rds their leaves during winter, they are still in a dormancy period.

A sidebar here... as a testament to just how warm the winters have become here in the mid atlantic region the past few winters, espeically last winter, many of the silver and red maples, at least here in my local area retained about 1/2 of their leaves into January, and many of them flowered again in late February, and some, in some microclimate locations such as the one behind my building, leafed out in mid march. I used to think it was kind of odd seeing trees around here still with much of their foliage, approaching christmas time, but it happens every year now so I have kind of gotten used to it. Live oaks in my area here, are evergreen, and not deciduous. We are about the northern most location you will find evergreen live oaks. The few that there are north of here, are in fact deciduous.

    Bookmark   June 27, 2008 at 12:50AM
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juni_perez(6a)

Yeah, I still don't know details on it. The ring around the base made me think it might be in a pot, but a gentleman there said all the trees there have it when newly planted to help keep water from running off and direct it over the roots. This is the first summer it's been out there, THAT I did find out (and it's starting to cause a buzz among local residents who see it). So I'll have to keep an eye out to see if in winter they take it in or mummy-wrap it up. Transplanting it too much might stress it to death. Mr David Francko (Palms Won't Grow Here and Other Myths) claims to be growing these outdoors in Ohio (zone 6a as well) with no problems. I'll keep everyone informed. I myself bought two of them to experiment with. They're beautiful!

    Bookmark   June 28, 2008 at 4:41PM
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josh_palm_crazy

Very cool juni perez. Keep us posted on how they do and how you protect them. Did you buy pindos or mules? I still think the Highland Park palm is a mule palm.

Jay

    Bookmark   June 28, 2008 at 7:02PM
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juni_perez(6a)

I bought Pindo Palms. If they sold me Mules/hybrids as Pindos, then it's my fault for not researching the seller. Eh? Lol.

I'll let you know what it is exaclty (the Highland palm) once I find someone who can help with that. I'll also definitely be keeping an eye on that this winter. So far, I'm being given the run-around... they're either not taking me seriously OR they're being typical government workers not wanting to do any work.

    Bookmark   June 29, 2008 at 11:06AM
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juni_perez(6a)

Update on the Palm in Highland Park...

... they pulled it into the greenhouse. =(
I don't think they'd like to risk it.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2008 at 8:25PM
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williamr

Wow, I am so glad they protect it! I was just thinking what a waste, though it looks great planted there in the summer. Also, I am one of those who put my bonsai in the fridge to give them dormancy, just put them in the other day.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2008 at 1:29AM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Hey everyone. Its been a while since I was last here and I was just reading some of the old threads where we talked about ugly palms... lol

Just wondering if the older members are still around?

Here is a few of my plants growing.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2012 at 6:55AM
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JohnnieB(Washington, DC 7a/b)

I'm still here, although I don't visit this forum very often anymore. Most of my palms are doing well; here's a recent view of my back yard showing what I think is a very NOT-ugly windmill palm:

    Bookmark   September 11, 2012 at 9:52AM
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bradleyo_gw

I'm still here but I've moved 3 times since then, and have actually returned full circle to the same town.

2007 - Irwin, Pa

2008 - Harrison City,Pa

2011 - Dubois, Pa

2012 - Irwin, Pa

    Bookmark   September 11, 2012 at 5:06PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Orchiddude, where abouts in alabama your in. Those palms are very beautiful. Whats your secret ?. Im growing a Pindo palm in the back yard along with a washingtonia robusta and 4 filifera seedlings.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2012 at 8:08PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

Yalls plants look great. Even the needle palms...lol

prinbama--I am in north alabama around Muscle Shoals area. Been growing palms in pots for 20 years. No secret really, just make sure they are watered regular and feed 5 to 6 times a year. Plants in pots like mine need to be feed more often than ones in the ground due to all the watering. I make sure I give most of them at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight. Here is another view of patio. My favorite palms are the spindles, bottles, and any feather leaf type palm. In the background you see a huge spindle, and in front a triangle. California Fan on side. Bottles are by the fence, and a Phoenix roebelenii on the left. If you look right down the middle you can see the Champagne Palm (Hyophorbe indica), its getting big now, more pictures of that later. I will share more pictures with you this weekend.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 7:20AM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Great Job with your palms. They look very happy and healthy. Here's Pictures of my little project. Im kinda testing the ground to see how well my Pindo and washingtonia's will do.

I purchased this Mexican fan palm from Home Depot just to see how well it will live in north alabama. So far its been in the ground for about 3 months and its grown about 4 fronds.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 12:40PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Here's my Pindo i picked up a week ago at a local Nursery.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 12:42PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Here's My Windmill palm with my seedlings (1 mexican fan palm, 4 california fan's)

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 12:44PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

My seedlings. the blue container is a mexican fan palm about 3 months old and the one on the left is a california about 6 weeks old.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 1:00PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

and 3 more filiferas about 6 weeks old.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 1:03PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

how can i post multiple picture's in one post ?. havent figured that out yet.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 1:08PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

To post multiple pictures just place the image link under each other.

example:

img src=Http://www.mypictures.com/palm1.jpg>
img src=Http://www.mypictures.com/palm2.jpg>
img src=Http://www.mypictures.com/palm3.jpg>

Make sure the Make sure the

Plants look good.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 2:36PM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Thank you orchiddude, I have a question though. I dont know much about pindo's but im starting to see some yellow on some of fronds. is this a sign of something ?. I think its because of some shock from transplanting but i would like a second opinion.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 3:58PM
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orchiddude(+7b ALabama)

It would be really hard to tell without knowing what all it has been through. Transplanting might do it. It could be an old leaf etc... Not much you can do be wait and see what happens. If a new leaf is growing, your probably ok. Just give it time and see what happens.

    Bookmark   September 12, 2012 at 9:41PM
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islandbreeze

I'm still around, been a member on this forum for at least 8 years now??? My original palms died as I learned from my mistakes. I got into palms with a Mexican Fan palm purchased from Daytona Beach 13 years ago. It eventually rotted after being put outdoors too early one wet spring. Kind of funny, just this past year I purchased two new Washingtonias, both Filibustas because that original Washy was one of my favorites. Glad to see some of the members from years ago are still around.

Johnnieb- Do you protect your palms at all anymore? Do you still have the Waggies?

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 1:25AM
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prinbama(Alabama 7b-8a)

Yeah There's 3 new fronds growing out of it. I'll keep an eye out for it.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 9:03AM
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