Help in identifying grasses?

reddingJuly 19, 2011

All right, you natives, I have a question for you. If I were to take some photos of grasses I have growing . . . mostly in what used to be a lawn, but some in the flower and veggie garden as well . . . could you help me identify them? It's a really mixed bag of at least a half-dozen varieties. Some are natives and who knows where the others came from, but maybe if I knew what they all are, it would help me figure out what to do with this place. Some are dead or dying, but others seem to be thriving. Just not in the pasture where I'd like them to be.

I have a terrible feeling that if I try to identify them via books and the online resources, I'm going to be sunk.

Pat

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owiebrain(5 MO)

Got pics up yet?

Diane

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 11:26AM
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redding

Hi Diane,

I was waiting to see if anyone would respond before I put up any photos. I'm afraid I may have really offended a lot of folks with my comments comparing the rich growing conditions of OK to the arid regions of the west. Sigh.

Okay, so here's what I've got. These are all things that are growing in the yard or garden areas, where they've had access to some water. If I just had them in the pasture where they'd be useful, I'd be a happy camper.

Can I assume that this one is plain old vigorous Bermuda that's climbing up the chain link fence? Roots to China and runners that invade anything and everything.

And this one tends to form thick clumps. It's also very vigorous, but does not have the Bermuda runners.

The next one may be more of the same.

Whatever this one is, it seems to have only a single tap root and no feeders. It pulls easily, and seems to be an individual plant that does not clump at all, but it also comes up everywhere in the garden.

And just so that no-one thinks I have a nice lush pasture when everyone is scrambling for feed for the animals, this is what the rest of the place looks like . . . all of it . . . except where there are outcrops of ragweed.

Pat

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 1:03PM
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Lisa_H(7)

I have lots of that #2 grass in my lawn. I think a friend of mine's lawn service guy called it Dallas grass. All I know is it is impervious to my lawn chem's that usually kill stuff.

I also have lots and lots of that single stuff.

(you didn't offend me :) although I felt a little guilty since I was the one complaining about another la nina!)

Lisa

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 4:51PM
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redding

Dallas grass, huh? Whatever it is, it's sturdy. Some of those clumps are over 2' wide. It seems to grow the instant it gets a tiny bit of water, and is going strong when a lot of other stuff is either failing or already died back for the season.

Pat

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 5:01PM
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Lisa_H(7)

Does it look like these pics?

Here is a link that might be useful: google images of dallas grass

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 5:06PM
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cactusgarden

The thin one you found so easy to pull is the hardest to get rid of, if not impossible. Its nut sedge and each piece if root will make a new plant so pulling one makes more. It spreads underground by horizontal brittle roots and produces seeds prolifically. It is commonly in top soil when you purchase it and unless you diligently pull them out carefully, you will have an infestation nearly impossible to eradicate.

When dealing with weeds, its not really necessary to ID them all exactly. Think in terms of type. Grassy types, broadleaf types and nut sedge. Each has a different method of elimination. I don't see any desirable natives in the photos. They look like the typical European imports that have invaded nearly every state in North America.

No one was offended. Please don't read so much into things! :-)) I found the description of our lush wet summers we are so used to having and the dry heat being foreign to us hilarious. There are lots desert and semi arid regions that we can use as comparisons but these not considered drought. I was just a little perplexed about the point?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 6:38PM
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redding

Thanks for the tip about the nut sedge, Janet. I had never heard of it, although I did suspect it was traveling underground. So it can be invasive also?

Lisa, the one does look just exactly like the Dallis Grass. Yippee. We've identified two of them. I don't even mind so much that they're imports (other than that wretched Bermuda garbage). I'm just trying to find out what actually does survive under these conditions, because my pasture certainly is not. Not that it means I'll seed the pasture in Dallis Grass. I'm just trying to find some sort of starting point. Unfortunately, my Katahdin sheep prefer the forbs and are pretty choosy about the grasses, although you'd never know it to look out there now.

Janet, here's another one that might make you laugh. My mother is totally convinced that it's terribly humid here. I keep telling her that it's not, and that we nearly always have a breeze. Sure, we do have some humid days, but nothing like what she's imagining. Vincennes, IN? Hey, now that can be some humid country. Nacogdoches TX? Yikes. Been there, done that. Thanks, but no thanks. I'll pass.

Pat

    Bookmark   July 20, 2011 at 8:54PM
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