Preventive Insect Spray

MrChris123June 18, 2014

Hi Everyone,
I recently planted my first vegetable "garden" (two 5'x3' raised beds) and I'm worried about insects coming and eating my vegetables. I haven't yet had a problem with bugs in the garden but I don't want to take any chances, so I was wondering if there are any veggie safe insect sprays that are available that will not only kill harmful insects, but also prevent them from coming to my garden in the first place? Or, would it be better/safer if I tried a non-chemical organic method? Thank you all!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog

The best prevention is paying attention. Dozens of critters, insects, fungus, etc...all waiting for the perfect time/timing to have a taste...
The best prevention is taking the time early every morning, with a cup of coffee, to check on progress or to notice a change. Look under leaves, note a nibble or hole in a leaf...
Look up a specific problem before action. Just treat one issue at a time...often it is just a stream of water, picking off a few uninvited guests, a mild insecticidal soap just on the underside of one plant...
Once identified, you may find the life cycle of and insect is just a few days and harmless to the crop...
-i've dealt with three minor issues so far...no harm to crops, no need to spray...no other beneficial insects were harmed by heavy spraying...
A healthy garden is not a perfect garden...always something happens that can't be controlled due to weather conditions, etc...so expect some problems and deal with them as they come...

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 11:36AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

With very few exceptions most all insecticides are broad spectrum and will kill off the beneficial insect as well as the pests. Spraying, unless there is a problem, is never a good idea.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 11:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardengal48

Preventative insect control for a veggie garden would involve companion planting or the planting of other plants in proximity that either attract the insects away from the veggies or repel them altogether.

I've attached one link but there are many others you could research.

Here is a link that might be useful: companion plantings

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 2:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

I'll add that this is the time for you to educate yourself about the MANY non harmful critters that you are likely to come across in your garden. Check out the zillions of websites with good images of beneficial insects and/or visit your local library or bookstore.

The more knowledgable you are about what you see, the better able you will be to protect your garden.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 4:06PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

I haven't yet had a problem with bugs

==>>> then you do NOT poison mother earth just for the hell of it ...

do some research on IPM .. integrated pest management..

the basic tenant of such ... is that you do not.. willy nilly prevent anything..

you pay attention.. and REACT to a know threat ... and not every bit of acne or blemish.. is a threat .. be sure to understand.. that you need only react.. when a population is significant enough to actually harm a plant ...

i find it hard to contemplate.. how others are encouraging you to coat the earth with product...

crikey.. relax... enjoy your garden.. and when you find an actual pest.. we can help you ID it.. and find the LEAST invasive remedy ... but until them.. DO NOT USE ANYTHING...

right kimmer?

ken

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 5:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ronalawn82(z9FL)

MrChris123, here is a sort of key which I devised some time ago for some employees.

  1. Know what the healthy plant/organ/tissue should look like.
  2. Inspect or scout weekly.
  3. Determine that an abnormality exists.
  4. Ascertain the causative organism and / or environmental condition.
  5. Decide if there is a need for human intervention.
  6. Choose the most benign treatment.
  7. Go to 2.
    Pretty straightforward, isn't it?
    Well yes ... until you get into the details.
    For some of us, then is when the fun starts!
    The others?
    "Chacun a son gout!"
    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 7:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

Ken, who's encouraging him to coat the earth with pesticides? Or are you ranting for the heck of it, lol.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 9:24PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Acacia invaded by Caterpillars!
My wife and I don't know what to do. We have a small...
llilibel03
Home made seed tape
sorry - moved post to diff forum This post was edited...
oldgardenguy_zone6
Lilac Concerns
My lilac plant is... frying? ... Lives in zone 8a One...
kricsten
Tomato disease
My tomato is under attack. It looks like both insects...
garf_gw
Tomato Leaf Disease
The tomato disease has begun here in Miami. Does this...
garf_gw
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™