Is this true?

donnabaskets(Zone 8a, Central MS)March 1, 2014

I have some friends who used to live in Phoenix, AZ. We were talking gardening recently and I was complaining that none of my "hot" peppers I planted last year got hot, except for the TAMs which were supposed to be mild. (I planted jalapenos and Anaheims.)

I grew them all in pots and got tons of beautiful peppers. Just not hot. My friends told me that I was overwatering the plants. They said in Phoenix, they never watered peppers except when rain came. This is news to me and I consider myself an experienced gardener.

TRUE?

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esox07

Not sure what the Tam heat is supposed to be, but Jalapenos are relatively mild and Anaheims are very mild...just a step up from bell peppers. Grow them a bhut or carolina reaper. And I would expect that if you never water your peppers in the Phoenix area, you won't have any left after about July. I doubt that overwatering would take away enough heat to be able to tell the difference. If your plants grew well, then you didn't overwater them.
Like I said, grow a Bhut (Ghost Pepper) or Carolina Reaper or one of the other super hots. You won't hear another complaint from them for the next three years. And if they can still talk after eating one, they won't waste their words on telling you that you overwater your peppers. If you need seeds, I will send you some.
Bruce

    Bookmark   March 1, 2014 at 10:19PM
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woohooman

Not true. The varieties you mentioned are very mild. Try growing Jalapeno M or serranos if you want heat but not scorching. In all cases, winter pods do lose some heat though.

I don't see much success in summer Phoenix unless one gets creative to cool the plants.

I like Bruce's idea too.

Kevin

This post was edited by woohooman on Sun, Mar 2, 14 at 3:11

    Bookmark   March 1, 2014 at 11:24PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE>

To prove that, just do as Bruce said. Your friend will be proven wrong.

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 12:59AM
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bob_in_pc(z8 FL)

I love jalapeño and Anaheim peppers - arguably the best Peppers for flavor. But for those that want heat, you have to step it up a couple of hundred thousand Scoville units. I suggest Caribbean Reds!

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 1:37AM
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tomt226

esox07,
ROTFLMAO!
Damn it, now I gotta clean coffee off my monitor...

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 7:09AM
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esox07

So, Donna, do you need seeds? All I ask in return is that you post a video of your "pepper aficionados" eating one.
Bruce

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 1:45PM
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jtight

Send me your address a/ I'll mail you a sample of hotsauce I make for you a/ friends. Tell em to take a drop or two a/ then you can laugh.

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 1:56PM
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barrie2m_

Most researchers growing identical varieties will see scoville rating differences under varying growing conditions. Many seed sources will publish vastly different heat units for the same variety. Basically, you never know the exact Capsacin level unless you repeatedly test each crop. I have seen that reported commonly. However, I suspect that average daily temperatures are more of a factor and your plants will need water. I would also expect that in years when we get a lot of rainfall the average daily temps are lower so one factor may lead to another.
People are now breeding hybrid varieties that are almost always milder than heirloom varieties. Chichen Itza looks like a habanero but has just a little more heat than a Jalopeno. I've grown a few supposedly very mild to no heat varieties like Sweet Cayenne, Fooled You (Jal), NuMex Orange Suave and Trinidad Perfume only to pick a few unpredictably hot peppers for no apparent reason. The same occurs with potted ornamental (edible) peppers that I grow. One variety, Medusa, was listed as very pungent a few years ago is now listed as non-pungent. Others have varied alot as well over time and I believe that the hottest pods occur when they are formed in high temperature conditions.

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 2:31PM
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barrie2m_

Most researchers growing identical varieties will see scoville rating differences under varying growing conditions. Many seed sources will publish vastly different heat units for the same variety. Basically, you never know the exact Capsacin level unless you repeatedly test each crop. I have seen that reported commonly. However, I suspect that average daily temperatures are more of a factor and your plants will need water. I would also expect that in years when we get a lot of rainfall the average daily temps are lower so one factor may lead to another.
People are now breeding hybrid varieties that are almost always milder than heirloom varieties. Chichen Itza looks like a habanero but has just a little more heat than a Jalopeno. I've grown a few supposedly very mild to no heat varieties like Sweet Cayenne, Fooled You (Jal), NuMex Orange Suave and Trinidad Perfume only to pick a few unpredictably hot peppers for no apparent reason. The same occurs with potted ornamental (edible) peppers that I grow. One variety, Medusa, was listed as very pungent a few years ago is now listed as non-pungent. Others have varied alot as well over time and I believe that the hottest pods occur when they are formed in high temperature conditions.

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 2:32PM
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Ohiofem(6a Ohio)

This is a mystery to me. A few years ago I grew Cajun belles from seed I got from Tomato Growers Supply. I gave three starts to a friend who grew them in his garden with clay based soil. I grew three starts from the same seed packet in a container. His were all bland with no noticeable heat. Mine were all quite hot, some matching the heat from Serrano del sols I grew in another container. The heat was the kind that sneaks up on you. It was decent if I took a bite from a freshly picked pepper, but much hotter cut up and used to make salsa. We only live about 10 miles apart, so our weather was the same. I used chemical fertilizers and I don't think he used any fertilizers.

    Bookmark   March 2, 2014 at 3:33PM
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barrie2m_

I had a similar experience with Cajun Bells. I had eaten a few from my own harvest and determined that they we fairly mild. I wanted to demonstrate that mildness to a customer and took a big bite of one at a market only to find that it was much hotter than any other previous one. I chased it with a few cucumbers and anything esle I could grab off my market stand. I learned a lesson.

Someone related to me had a similar experience with my Sweet Cayenne variety which is not supposed to have any heat. I traced it back to one plant of 20 that the peppers looked slightly different- not as long and slightly greenish color rather than solid yellow. So some of these mishaps can be traced back to a variable seed from the supplier.

    Bookmark   March 3, 2014 at 10:21AM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Some peppers are inconsistent in heat, especially the mild ones that start as heatless early on and turn hot. I have heard PADRON is like that. I have also experience similar with Jalapenos. But then therea re peppers that are super hot from day one, like pequin/pequit, midnight.

    Bookmark   March 4, 2014 at 7:05PM
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donnabaskets(Zone 8a, Central MS)

This is all very interesting and I thank all of you for your responses. We did, indeed, have a wetter and cooler summer last year than I have ever experienced here. (Followed by a much colder winter than we've experienced! Go figure.)

I have started about a dozen varieties of peppers for this year and am looking forward to giving them a try. I will definitely taste with caution at all times! :)

    Bookmark   March 11, 2014 at 6:19PM
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