Complete growing time guide

Bill106(4)April 8, 2012

I understand that each zone differs, however I'm looking for a link to a general growing time for hot peppers. Just something to use as a rough guide. I've had my peppers growing for a few weeks but I just ordered some Trinidads. Hope I'm not getting too late to start those up now being in Wisconsin. Thanks

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mbellot

I'm no expert, but my understanding is the growing time is tied much more to the particular variety, not the zone where you are growing them.

You may be late on the Trinidads (depending on the specific variety), I'm in Illinois (by O'Hare) and started mine in late January. However, I've got some sweet bells that the wife wants that I'm starting today (hopefully).

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 12:10PM
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ottawapepper

Like mbellot, I started my Trinidad's and other super hots in January.

According to my notes, Scorpions and 7 Pots are 90 - 100 days to maturity / pods.

It's a bit late for zone 4 but I'd give a few seeds a shot, We may get a great season. Save some seeds for next year and start them earlier.

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 12:28PM
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WichitaChief

I was late with my ghosts last year. I tried something suggested to me, I overwintered some plants to have a mature pepper going into this year. Just an idea if the season runs out before the plants produce.

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 12:43PM
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Bill106(4)

I'll give a couple seeds a shot and be vigilant. I like the idea of overwintering also. Also if anyone finds a growing time/index link please post. Thanks all.

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 2:42PM
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plant_newbie_2010(6b)

Hi, I don't know if this will help, but I found a post someone had on their bhut growing timeline for zone 7. Here's the link: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/pepper/msg0723151717924.html

Hope it helps!!=)

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 4:27PM
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esox07

Bill06. I am in Wisconsin too. About 50 North of Madison. I would say you will have a tough time getting ripe pods by the time the season is over. Most of the Super Hots take longer than the more mild varieties and you should have already started the milder varieties as well although you probably still have a chance with them. Couple options: 1: Like WitchitaCheif says, plan on bringing a plant or two indoors before the season is over and let the pods ripen indoors. 2: buy some starters from a nursery. Although you will be limited on the varieties available.

Bruce

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 6:05PM
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tsheets(5)

I have no idea about the timelines and the chances of a harvest this year. But, I was also going to suggest that you could overwinter the plant and have a head start next year. So, even if you don't get a harvest, it wasn't all for nothing. :-)

If you have never overwintered before, please, do some research on it so you know ahead of time what problems you will likely run into. There's almost always some hurdles along the way, and the better prepared you are to spot them before things get out of control, the better off you will be.

Along those lines, If you bring a plant or two in to let the pods ripen inside, expect to be bringing bugs inside with it. And with no natural predators, they set up shop pretty quickly.

Not trying to scare you, but, these are things that I have experienced. It's better to be aware and know what to expect than be surprised down the road. :-)

    Bookmark   April 8, 2012 at 6:32PM
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capoman(5a)

I start my superhots in mid February. I start harvesting end of July. I do use heat mats and significant artificial light to give them a strong head start. If I was to go without heat mats and tried to germinate and start in a south facing window, and plant in the ground, I'd probably not harvest in time. Also, my early harvest is only in large black containers. My peppers in the ground are almost two months later, and risk being lost to frost. In zone 4, I would consider doing pots exclusively.

    Bookmark   April 9, 2012 at 8:38AM
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scotty66(8 Hutto TX)

This is sort of a timeline... I found these videos on YouTube and thought they were interesting.

A guy in Minnesota made 17 videos, starting march 2011 with newly emerged seedlings and runs through last harvest on Sept. 2011.

Nice watching the plants progress through various stages.

Here is a link that might be useful: How to grow hot peppers part 1

    Bookmark   April 10, 2012 at 12:16AM
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Bill106(4)

Thanks again for all the info.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2012 at 8:03PM
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