Palms in Long Branch New Jersey Beaches

brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)August 3, 2010

Warning this is shocking. On our way to Ocean Grove NJ, we passed Long Branch and stopped to use the bathroom and look what we found. You have to see it to believe it and with the hot weather, it felt and looked like Florida instead of the Jersey Shore.

A long view across the beach looking southward with Queen and Coconut Palms.

Me in front of a seafood restaurant and remember this is in New Jersey.

Looking down the beach northward.

The Tiki hut up by the hotel looking like Club Med, music and all.

Yet another boardwalk area. Some of these coconut palms were growing coconuts and surely will not survive winter. However it was something to see so many - literally dozens. Too bad they did not plant sabal palmettos that would have stood a chance in a warm winter.

There were many cold tolerant washys among the palms.

Yup this is New Jersey!!!

This Queen Palm was blooming. Its been a hot summer.

The development is called Pier Village.

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islandbreeze

That's pretty impressive! Somebody's got some money to burn even in a bad economy all that money spent LOL. It would be awesome to see some of those washys survive the winter and start regrowing next year. Looks like they may even be Filiferas, so maybe they have a chance. I'm surprised how big those palms are. Next year they should forget about the coconuts and opt for more queen palms. The queens look much healthier, plus they'll survive longer.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 8:47AM
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jacklord(7A)

Ocean City, MD does this as well. I assume most croak once winter arrives.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 9:18AM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

That's very nice!!! Love the palms but Im sad to think about them dying. I really doubt any of them will survive and with a harsh ocean wind like that, I think they will be done by Christmas time! The NJ beaches make a lot of money so they can probably afford to replace them every year. Thanks for sharing! I did like seeing a mix of the tropicals (foxtails and coconuts) with the more cold tolerant (queens and washingtonias). Still I wish they would invest in needles, sabal minors, and windmill palms. With some protection, those palms would make it and in the end, end up costing less money. But too bad those palms aren't as beautiful as the ones in the pics! I'm happy to see the queen palm flowering. I guess the coconut palms just weren't happy enough to get some blooms though :(
Good luck!!
-Alex

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 10:11AM
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trishmick(z7NJ)

I live about 15 min. south of Pier Village. The development is going on ten yrs. old or so now, and they've been planting palms every year for awhile. Originally, it was palmettos only, and far fewer. I see they've really increased the stock. The beach clubs just north of there used to plant queens as well. A bar called Donovan's Reef near Sandy Hook has loads of coconuts on their beach and around their tiki hut every year. Great place to enjoy a cold one. They do this all over the Shore. Jenkinson's in Point Pleasant has a wider beach than Pier Village, rides, amusements, and lots of palms. And yes, they perish or are removed. 'Round here, by November, if they havn't been removed, they're toast.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 10:58AM
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subtropix

It just may pay for some South Floridians to make the trip north to rescue the palms from eventual death and get some free palms in the deal.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 11:23AM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

They must have a big budget for this and I noticed the prices on everything were high. It was a classy restort.

Yup I did notice beach clubs along the way had many palms as well. Its an idea that has caught on. People like it and it really looks like Florida with so many. It made me want to come back and just enjoy the atmosphere and some dining.

November and even December can be pretty mild in coastal Jersey and Brooklyn NY at least 50-60% of winters. I doubt the Queen and Washy Palms would be dead by November. Even the some coconut palms survived Florida's big drops which was worse then our November in length and temps.

Four years ago my Queen Palm lived right until the end of January when the temps finally dropped into the teens at night for a week. Then it died. I could have saved her with lights and plastic. Oh well.

It was plain fun to see all these palms. Small Sabal Palmettos would be wiser. But these folks want pure "TROPICAL".

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 11:35AM
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butiaman(8a Douglasville,GA.)

Love the pictures Greg.Just looking at them,you would think they were taken somewhere in Florida.The Oueen Palms look like they have done the best,or the Washingtonias.I noticed in the picture with you in it,there was some Pygmy Date Palms.It reminds me of this fruit stand down the street from me that had 100 or mabey more for sale.I was buying some strawberries and I heard him telling people that they would live here,he had singles,doubles and triple trunk ones for $25 dollars.They had about 4 foot trunks on them,I thought to myself that's cheap for them that big.He sold all of them,there now are all kind of gas stations and stores that have them planted out front.I couldent lie to people to just sell a palm,if it's not cold hardy for here I would just tell them.Your right in saying people want pure tropical.Everybody around here wants mule palms now.A lady bought 3 of mine,I told her there not cold hardy for here but she wanted them anyhow.She said she knew several people who would buy as many as I could get.I quess some people have plenty money to burn.Hope you had a good vacation and welcome back.

    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 11:35PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Thanks Butiaman. Good to hear from you. My vacation was restful and next year I am taking two weeks Lord willing. How are your butias doing? Growing fast I bet.

Aren't those pitures shocking for the Jersey shore. Good point to be honest. Its very wise of you. That guy misleading people may have some angry folks looking for him come Springtime. We protect ourselves from consequences when we do the right thing.

Pygmy Date Palms are somewhat cold hardy but not that much. They can endure some cold snaps but not the cold we saw last year. It will be intersting to see if any live.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2010 at 4:13PM
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jacklord(7A)

A cafe near my office always has 4 huge specimens to make screens. They always get 4 different kinds and never bring them in when winter comes. I always watch as they slowly croak by February. This year they have a Trachy for the first time, so maybe it will make it.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2010 at 4:29PM
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butiaman(8a Douglasville,GA.)

Those pictures are amazing and shocking.Just think if you didn't have to make a pit stop you wouldn't have got to see all those palms on the beach.Everything happens far a reason.My Pindos are doing a lot better,thanks for asking.Have you ever done something far a plant and It seemed like the plant smiled at you or it said thank you?I haven't watered them for three weeks now,and I gave them miracle grow plant food for palms,plus palm tone.We have had a good rain at least once a week for the past three weeks,a good slow steady rain.I took a frond to my county extension office and the sent me back a letter saying they were suffering from a potassium deficiency.Since I gave them the miracle grow palm fertilizer and palm tone,they look greener and much more healthier.I did what you said you do with your palms.I only gave the palm fertilizer and palm tone at half the rate they said to give to plants.I read also that pindos don't like liquid fertilizer,just what I was giving them.From my experience with the one I had far ten years,they really don't take off with alot of growth till the third year.I guess it takes them that long to get really established.

    Bookmark   August 5, 2010 at 9:05PM
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protempsfish

Great pictures Greg! I thought I saw Snookie, Sammy Sweetheart and the Situation in one of those pics :)

    Bookmark   August 6, 2010 at 9:55AM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Good to hear everyone's feedback.

As far as Snookie, Sammy Sweetheart ...lol. I heard on Saturdays the beach is busy, it was half cloudy the day we stopped by for photos and I think Snookie, Sammy Sweetheart were waiting for warmer weather... lol. BTW, everyone who does not know, Protemp is talking about some locally popular ladies. I stick with my wife:)

Butiaman, thanks for the warning about liquid fertilzers and pindos. That's good to know.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2010 at 12:20PM
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trishmick(z7NJ)

Comedy. Snookie and Co. are lowering the IQ of Seaside Heights (which doesn't need the help let me tell you) about 25 miles south of Pier Village. Seaside is very similar to Coney Island. And it is among the places that do not put palms all over the beach. You'll see them there, but scattered about.

    Bookmark   August 8, 2010 at 10:03AM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

This season they're in Miami Beach! I tried watching 10 minutes of the show, but I couldn't. I have no idea what everyone sees in that show but MTV was in big trouble until this show somehow managed to get an audience, a huge one at that! I really dont know why so many people like it.
But in a similar topic, While I was trying to watch the show, I did manage to find some queens lining the street while they were driving down. I always look for palms!
-Alex

    Bookmark   August 8, 2010 at 3:32PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Alex, I think you would enjoy a ride down to this Jersey Beach area as I know you are a palm enthusiast and give us your opinion.

They did a good job especially with the Queen palms. The resturant at the north end of the peir looks like Florida and the Queens are sooo healthy. However the mixing in of the washy palms on the beach looks a little out of place. Placing them along the walkways would have looked more uniform and Floridian.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2010 at 11:46AM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

After seeing Justin's pics I wonder where these palms are purchased from.

    Bookmark   August 10, 2010 at 4:40PM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

I think a ride down the beaches in New Jersey would be really nice! If I have the time, I will definitely have to go down and see all the palms for myself!!! I was thinking the same thing about the washys. They may grow all over the beaches in California, but they just look out of place with the coconut palms and queens especially the way they are laid out. But the queens look very good and the coconut palms surprisingly look very healthy also. Those foxtail palms by the seafood restaurant in the pic your in look very nice! The fronds are completely green.
I also wonder where these palms are shipped from. Im going to guess they might get them shipped from somewhere since I dont think any nursery in NJ sell that many coconut palms!
-Alex

    Bookmark   August 10, 2010 at 7:38PM
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tropicpalms

Theese palms amaze me! Very beautiful mature and some flowering palm trees right on the beach... I just cant believe they would just let them die in the winter! they should make a deal with the malls etc. during the winter months to store them in. My guess is they got them from north Florida, just my guess. hopefully soon they can just come here and get them! haha. but really super pics thanks so much for sharing! talk soon -Justin in VB

    Bookmark   August 10, 2010 at 9:24PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

I agree, they must be shipped from FL because I think any internation tree shipping would be so regulated it would cost too much. Plus coconut palms have a limted habitable climate on the East Coast where they can be cultivated.

Justin - are we going to see yard and pool pics soon?

    Bookmark   August 11, 2010 at 10:27AM
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DLoonam71_aol_com

This looks great! Trying to find a nice close beach from Northern NJ. Gonna check it out! Regarding the palm trees; I do not think palm trees naturally grow in Florida. They are probably shipped from tropical islands, possibly where Long Branch got them from too. Will try to find out. If you notice, FL is always planting palms....

    Bookmark   June 21, 2011 at 4:43PM
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statenislandpalm7a(7a)

It looks great but its depressing to know that all these palms that took years to grow are all going to die in the winter. This year I drove through ocean city MD and they do the same thing there. I did see some butias at the ocean front and some of them survived. They are probably from florida. If the resorts planted sabal palmettos, windmills, and pindos for one year and protected them they would save alot of money.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2011 at 6:56PM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

They are beautiful, but it is sad to see. And about natural palms in Florida, palms do naturally grow in florida, but of course, many more of them are planted along beaches and hotels to give a more tropical feel. Sabal palmettos are naturally growing all over florida, but you wont see many growing in a nice and even row like you do in Florida's Northern beaches. Coconut palms do naturally grow on the beaches in Southern Florida, but a ton more are planted then naturally grow!
I know that Sabal Palmettos are not shipped from other countries since they grow best in the Southeast USA. Coconut palms probaby are also gotten from Florida, but the more exotic palms are definitely shipped in. Im sure that the palms on Long Branch are from Florida because they are so dirt cheap to buy there!
Good luck!
-Alex

    Bookmark   June 21, 2011 at 7:18PM
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tropicpalms

the palms in Maryland and NJ coast are all from Fl. They look beautiful but yes it is so sad that they all die! They get truckloads of palms every spring!

    Bookmark   June 21, 2011 at 8:52PM
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wetsuiter(7b/8a)

Garden centers here on the Delaware coast get in huge shipments of cheap tropical palms every year. Hotels and resort businesses and people with pools plant them like annual flowers. One miniature golf / sea shell shop looks like Florida every summer. The queen palms stay green til January most years.

I guess most folks in the Mid Atlantic Don't realize there are winter hardy palms. Most garden centers including Walmart, Lowes and Home Depot have good selections of hardies. But they don't seem to publicize it much.

    Bookmark   June 21, 2011 at 10:29PM
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jacklord(7A)

I think what Danielle meant was that palms are not indigenous to Florida.

Now of course some are such as Sabals and Needles. But all those nice coconut palms and date palms were imported in long ago and have naturalized. Same with California. Both are triumphs of botanical metamorphosis.

I saw some article saying how Windmill Palms were now naturalized in some parts of Europe as so many have been brought in.

But I doubt that will happen in New Jersey. At least with those species.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 1:20PM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

I dont think any palm would ever naturalize in NJ. I mean short term, maybe, but not long term. Every 20 years or so, we just get a winter that is too cold for a palm that isnt at least protected by a nice concrete building. There are tons of palms naturalizing in FL like you said, and there are probably parts of the deep south where Trachycarpus is naturalizing (since I hear so much about how people in the south have windmill palms seedlings all over their yard after their palm blooms.
Since Earth goes through patterns of warm years and cold years (every 2 decades or so), I think we are going to be entering a colder period of time soon which means that if palms arent protected around here, there is a good chance they will be gone!
-Alex

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 2:04PM
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wetsuiter(7b/8a)

I've seen windmills and sabal minors naturalizing (under parent trees in gardens ) in Rehoboth Beach Delaware. Seen photos of naturalizing windmill near Vancouver, BC.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 2:09PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Yes, palms are indigenous to Florida. Like Alex said, Sabal Palmettos are indigenous right up to the mid North Carolina coast and coconut palms are indigenous to South Florida, many other types also grow wild, but they are the main east coast palms.

Wetsuiter had some good points as well. Too bad hotels are not trying more cold hardy palms.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 2:42PM
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jacklord(7A)

I don't think the Coconut Palm is indigenous to Florida. They were brought from Malaysia and other places long ago. Now, they are indeed naturalized to some extent, but that is something seperate and distinct from indigenous.

Same with the Date Palm, Royal Palm, Queen Palm, banana and citrus trees, iguanas, pythons, walking catfish, and parrots (parrots are in Brooklyn as well).

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 3:12PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Hi Jacklord,

There are different varieties of coconut palms depending on the region. The variety found in Florida are common in the Caribbean because coconuts float up on hot beaches and further inland in hurricanes, they spread and grew naturally long ago in Florida. Even Burmuda, which is quite north of southern Florida has these palms naturally because of its coastal warming effect. They floated there, rooted, grew, and spread just like in Florida.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 3:16PM
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subtropix

The native Royal palms of South Florida are the 'Royal Florida palms' (Roystonea elata). Roystonea regia (Royal Cuban) were imported from Cuba.--Both beautiful trees!

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 5:35PM
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cfa_li(z7/8 Queens, NY)

Speaking of coconut palms, I saw my first last month....in Queens (yes NYC). It was at least 15 feet tall with healthy vibrant leaves/fronds. I highly doubt it's still there, it was in a parking lot with a lot of other palms.

I haven't been to South Florida yet so that explains why I haven't seen any. I never saw them in Central FL.

It certainly caught my eye, I wish I could've gotten a pic.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 5:49PM
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jacklord(7A)

Hey Brooklyn:

Never heard that although there is some logic to it. From my observations, and granted that's not much, one does not see much in the way of coconut palms growing random or wild in Florda. Most have been placed intentionally. Contrast that with a species like Sabals which are literally all over the place.

I also distincly recall many Floridians telling me they were not native, but again, that is purely anecdotal.

The jury remains out....

At the end of the day, it does not matter. I reckon 90 percent of what grows in my yard originates from somewhere else. I don't study in the School of Native Species Only. If I lived in Florida, I would have a Coconut grove.

Except where they could fall on my car.

:)

    Bookmark   June 24, 2011 at 12:30PM
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us_marine

I do know that coconuts, and most palms you see in Florida arnt't native. People brought them over from other places.

I did read somewhere that before christopher columbus arrived, there were no coconuts in the caribbean. It was when people started to settle over there that they brought them. And if I remember correctly, a shipwreck occured carrying coconuts. Many of which washed up in Southern Florida and sprouted. I could be wrong about that but I thought I read that somewhere.

It just like California, only native palm is the washy. The others were brought over. I do think Florida had like 3 or 6 native palms.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2011 at 2:16PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Good conversation. I research it and I was surprised to find out the verdict isn't in. I thought they were absolutely native and there is a strong possibility all the coconuts we see really do originate from southeast Asia. Some historians think Columbus era settlers brought them over in the 1550s. Some botanists think S. America. I am more enlightened on this:)

    Bookmark   June 24, 2011 at 3:46PM
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jacklord(7A)

It is interesting. If you can, check out the NOVA segement on all of the non-native reptiles that reside in Florida, especially Pythons.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2011 at 4:45PM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

Heres a list of all the palms that are definitely native to Florida
Pseudophoenix sargentii
Sabal palmetto
Sabal etiona
Sabal minor
Thrinax radiata
Thrinax morrisii
Rhapidophyllum hystrix
Acoelorrhaphe wrightii
Roystonea regia
Serenoa repens

Coconut palms are definitely naturalized in Florida and I think they are as native in Florida as anywhere else in the Carribean.

Its a very interesting topic!
-Alex

    Bookmark   June 24, 2011 at 5:19PM
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jacklord(7A)

I will say they blend right in. The bringing of Cococnut Palms and other more exotic species really transformed the appearance of Florida from another southern state to a place that often (Sanibel, the Keys) resembles Jamaica or Hawaii. And the irony is that Florida is not even in the Tropic Zone. You gotta love the Gulf Stream.

My late grandfather had several Coconut Palms in his yard in Ft Lauderdale. Did not pay a dime. Grew them all from sprouted ones he found at the beach. That certainly constitutes naturalized .

    Bookmark   June 25, 2011 at 8:40AM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

I am glad to see these photos still circulating.

I thought it was interesting and cool that a few miles of the Jersey Shore was done up with palms. It gave it a vacation feel. All the shops, fine foods and sights are new as well and the palms fit in. As someone who grew up on Long Island I thought the natural shoreline was scenic but not as exciting as Florida and SC.

I concur Alex, naturalized wins, because when I travel around Florida there are beaches where the palms have washed up and grew in odd positions and locations that are not developed by man.

    Bookmark   July 5, 2011 at 2:35PM
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Hunter_M(Kentucky Z.6)

They are just going to let them die? Poor palms!

    Bookmark   July 5, 2011 at 2:43PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

I would guess asking one of the managers in the late fall if you can take one of the washys would probably work. If I had the space I would:)

    Bookmark   July 5, 2011 at 4:07PM
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HardyPalmFreak((7b)(Bronx, NY))

Holy Cow!!!

    Bookmark   July 5, 2011 at 7:04PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Isn't that something. I am sure they replanted their coast line again. Its worth going to see if you're a hardy palm freak:)) lol. And the palms not just here and there. Its for a mile or so and even the smaller gardens have flowering tropicals you usually only see in Florida.

    Bookmark   July 7, 2011 at 2:02PM
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dlprivett61_yahoo_com

Those palms at the Jersey shore are great, but I feel that they should try to grow palms that may survive our winters. I have a bunch of Trachy's in my yard along with some Sabal Minors. One of my Sabals has flowered and produced seed the last two years. I also plant queens in the ground, in their pots which I remove about November to over-winter in my house. It's a lot of work but it is worth it, they look great and tropical especially mixed in with my cold hardy bananas.

    Bookmark   August 10, 2011 at 10:11AM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

Very true Privett61.

    Bookmark   August 18, 2011 at 3:29PM
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elman23

These people must have spent a ton of money on palms that are for sure dead by the end of winter. Windmill palms, banana palms, needle palms and several other species have little problem surviving NJ winters. I have been doing this for years now and my palms keeping getting taller and fuller with each passing year. Contact ELMAN23@aol.com if you'd like to see pictures.

    Bookmark   February 5, 2012 at 2:34PM
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brooklyngreg(7a NYC coastal plain)

They do it every year. If you post your photos on photobucket.com and then copy and paste the HTML code here the picture shows up. Like you see below - my butia 2 years ago. The photo shows up when you preview it.

my tracky

    Bookmark   February 6, 2012 at 3:43PM
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cactus_dude(Tucson)

I find it horrible that all those palms are planted knowing they are destined to freeze and die. It's stupid and selfish to plant them every year to give the beach a "Florida look". If you want a Florida beach, go to Florida. They should at least try to protect those poor palms in the winter. If the resorts have that much cash to spend on planting all those trees, they surely have the means to protect them in the winter.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2012 at 10:36AM
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wetsuiter(7b/8a)

I know what you're saying. There are better choices to plant for long term survival. But its really no different than planting annual tropical flowers like impatiens, begonias or other annual favorites.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2012 at 6:30PM
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cactus_dude(Tucson)

wetsuiter, it is absolutely different from planting an annual, tropical or otherwise. Palm trees are not annuals by any stretch of the imagination. Annuals by definition germinate, flower, set seed and die each year.. By contrast, even fast growing species of palm take years to reach flowering size. This planting of palms in NJ of all places just to dress up a swanky resort is offensive and irresponsible.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2012 at 12:03AM
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jimhardy

Good point dude -\\about the cost of protecting as opposed to replacing.....

Looks like to tropical of palms to protect though.

Click for weather forecast

    Bookmark   February 11, 2012 at 4:03PM
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wetsuiter(7b/8a)

Ok. Impatiens was a bad example. People also plant large tropical hibiscus, crotons, philodendrons that took nurseries years to grow, yet they are treated like annuals--just for one summer season and allowed to die in the winter. Very common at beach resorts every where along the east coast. Even in places where hardy sabal palmetto grow, tropical palms and hibiscus are planted to augment the plantings and make it more enticing for the tourists. Nurseries grow these "disposable" tropicals in mass quantities for just such businesses. It's not irresponsible, necessarily. Those tropical looking places bring in lots of tourist dollars, that in turn buys more tropicals from the growers and plant distributors the next season. It's a business.

Do I agree with it? Heck no.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2012 at 1:00AM
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trishmick(z7NJ)

Just an FYI, I went up to where these are planted every year back in November and there was no indication that they'd ever been there to begin with. Since it has been such a mild Winter, I've got to believe that many, if not all, were still doing well. So...I can only assume they were removed for overwintering somewhere. This place is a series of restaurants, bars, and shops, not a resort per se. I'm sure all of the merchants kick in to provide the "feel" and defray whatever maintenence costs there are because people will now come by with their dollars. When everyone wins, I'm not so sure that's irresponsible. Having said that, I'm perfectly happy with my local beach sans the palm trees. Foolish, would be my town planting them all over and then dumping the cost on moi. When it's done around here, private entities are involved, and they can spend their money any way they wish...

    Bookmark   February 12, 2012 at 9:18AM
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tropicalzone7(7b)

My opinion is that if people didnt keep throwing their plants out ever year then many nursuries would be driven practically out of buisness. The people that buy these showy tropicals bring tons of money to nursuries. I see restaurants here that have 4 huge christmas palms that they probably bought for around 200 dollars each. Thats almost 1000 dollars! Its definitely a buisness.
But personally I really dont like the idea of seeing tropical palms and other plants die every summer. Some of the plants left outside do really well indoors, but people just dont want to work that hard and would rather spend the extra money instead. I know that I bring as many tropical plants inside as I can which is 100s!
-Alex

    Bookmark   February 12, 2012 at 1:12PM
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cactus_dude(Tucson)

Okay, my bad. If lots of money is being made, then it must be ok.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2012 at 11:08AM
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jacklord(7A)

I hear what you are saying. It is a waste. And Northeastern beaches have their own unique appeal. They don't really need the palms to be there en masse.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2012 at 1:37PM
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wetsuiter(7b/8a)

Cactus dude, its all good. If you're not familiar with mid Atlantic and Northeast Beach culture, its radically different than going to a beach in California. California is more about day tripping to the beach. It's a year round beach climate and people go there to surf or picnic or watch the sunset. Here, our beach season is short. Businesses have three precious months to make money for the entire year. Rent is VERY expensive. Anything that sets you apart from your competitor or makes your place look more "beachy" will help make the season. Tourists generally don't do day trips either, as most of the east coast cities are a few hours drive from their favorite beach resorts. So visits are often in increments of every weekend, entire week's vacation or entire seasons renting a house (often year after year or generations). Repeat loyal customers are big business. The thousands spent on "disposable" palms can translate to hundreds of thousands for the beach club, bar, mini golf or restaurant. Same for the garden center that sold the palms and installed them. Growers too.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2012 at 5:02PM
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