Question???

frogview00June 22, 2013

How many folks here on this forum grow plumeria in ground?

Jim

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tdogdad(Zone 9)

I have 33 in the ground.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2013 at 4:45PM
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beachplant(9b)

I grow most of mine in the ground, the rest will be in the ground as they get larger or outgrow their pots. Or I get energetic, whichever comes first.
I think I have 40 or so in ground.
Tally HO!

    Bookmark   June 22, 2013 at 6:49PM
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jwhite2947(7b Arkansas)

I am not an experienced grower like most on this forum, but I grow my plumeria in the ground during the growing season. I dig them up before frost and put them bare rooted in the insulated garage. My mom let hers go dormant but kept it inside in a pot this winter, and my plants and hers are doing about the same. My husband said moving the large pots was just too hard. I live in central Arkansas so I couldn't leave my plants outside all winter.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2013 at 9:05PM
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frogview00

Thank you for the replies. And, please accept my apology for the short, abrupt post above.

I'm just a bit confused when folk mention soil mixes and show photos of potted plumerias. Also, on websites that mentions "grows well in Florida", and then again "grafted plants". Do some varieties have different soil requirements? It makes me drag my foot when thinking about purchasing through mail order or at the big box stores.

Thanks for any clarification help.

Jim.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2013 at 10:02PM
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elucas101(8)

Hi frogview! Well, I think the warmer the climate you have, the easier it is to grow plumeria. All varieties of plumeria want the same thing though: warmth, sun, well draining soil and food & water. The more of that you provide, the easier they will be to keep. So your climate is probably pretty favorable for plumeria I would think. You will have to bring them in for the winter though, that is why so many are potted, for ease of bringing inside. They all just want well draining soil -something like potting soil mixed with perlite - nothing fancy.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2013 at 1:02AM
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beachplant(9b)

Grafted plants are usually those that are hard to root. Cuttings of the cultivar are grafted to the trunk of what is usually a seedling grown to the appropriate size.

Grows well in Florida is one of those "duh" statements. It`s like grape oil saying "cholesterol free" on the label.

Tally HO!

    Bookmark   June 23, 2013 at 11:25AM
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tdogdad(Zone 9)

Plumerias grow well in the hot summer weather almost anywhere. The plants cannot survive long hard frosts or freezes and are prone to diseases and root rot if wintered in cold, soggy ground. They can be left outside in zone 10 and most zone 9s but those areas must be careful to protect the plants from frosts.
People cover them with frost cloth or other materials and/or put xmas lights or fans nearby. I let mine survive, but have periodically lost some plants in zone 9 So. California near coastal.
Plumerias require fast draining soils. I use Jack Morgan's mix which is a redwood and pumice combination popular on the west coast. Al-s mix (gritty)is a heavy rock/fired clay based and I believe fir mix popular on the east coast where pumice seems to be hard to find. Some people mix cactus mix and perlite 50-50 which is not as complex but easy to find. Regular potting soils are used but risk root rot from too much water retention.
Grafting is like Tally Ho explained but also an advantage is your cutting is several months ahead because it gets a well established root system. The disadvantage is the graft can look ugly later especially if the root stock grows at a different rate than the cutting.
Plumeria growing is part science part art. Thus you have many ideas and many self proclaimed "experts." If it were very easy, it would not be such an addiction. You just have to research, read, and decide what best fits your area. Best to identify where you live (city/state) and hope you have an experienced grower or collector in your area. Have fun.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2013 at 2:08PM
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frogview00

Thanks , everyone. In moving to Broward County, Florida, I just left my collection of 154 old garden roses (sigh) in North Carolina .With the roses, any shrub that was grafted meant it was not growable "own-root" in your area, and it would be extremely difficult for the shrub to thrive without extreme chemical spraying . This was my confusion.

In the area I live now there are hundreds, if not thousands of mature plumeria that date back to the building boom of the post WWII 1950's in South Florida. Two mature trees I see daily out my windows in the neighbors yard that she rooted in 1960. Gorgeous!

BTW, I've been here five months and already have seven! Lets hope I live long enough to see them at maturity. lol

Jim

    Bookmark   June 24, 2013 at 11:50AM
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beachplant(9b)

You have the perfect resource for your area right next door! They grow fairly quickly, especially in your climate.
Welcome to the addict corner.
Tally HO!

    Bookmark   June 24, 2013 at 1:00PM
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pcput

Jim, did you move any plants to FL and how did you transport, as they want to inspect plants coming in to the state? We are looking to move to FL and worry about bring my plants with.
Peg

    Bookmark   June 26, 2013 at 7:57PM
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frogview00

Hi Peg. No. I came believe that you should only grow what will grow in your climate and soil. I have just started to learn about all the new exotic plants that are in South Florida now. Some are house eaters!

It is not so much the plant you bring to the state, but the soil and what could be in it (critters). On the other hand, I mail ordered old roses from Canada and the west coast, not an issue.
jim

    Bookmark   June 26, 2013 at 10:17PM
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pcput

Thanks Jim. That's what trouble you get into growing tropicals when you don't live some place tropical."LOL" I was thinking the best way was to bare root all of them to transport. Fortunately you can do that with plumerias.
Peg

    Bookmark   June 26, 2013 at 11:24PM
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