My Jalapenos have no heat and some are turning bright red....

bksinaz(z9 AZ)June 24, 2005

I noticed that some of my Jalapeno are turning red. Normal? Why?

Second question is that I tasted one of the red Jalapeno peppers. It had no heat at all.......NONE. Why?

I wonder if the green ones have heat...maybe I will try one in a few days.

It is a relativly new plant. Maybe two months old. Peppers are almost as old. (Bought plant with Jalapenos already on the plant)

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opqdan(z5 NE OH)

Almost all peppers turn red when ripe. The only reason we have green peppers is becasue they are picked before they can turn, either for taste reasons, or because ripe peppers could go bad during storage and transport.

The heat level of a pepper is VERY dependent on the growing conditions. Even different peppers on the same plant can have vastly differing heat levels. For example, sometimes I end up with "cool" habaneros that are barely hotter than cayenne, and sometimes I end up with a scorcher that makes me weep (normally habs just make my face quite red). I've even had hungarian wax before that I swear was hotter than almost any other pepper that I had eaten.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2005 at 10:37AM
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Todd_In_Texas(Zone 8A Dallas)

Hey BKSinAZ
Any follow up? Have the green ones been any hotter for you? I find that when I eat them green they're a little warmer. Just pick them when they start to "cork" or have those small brown/tan strees stripes down their sides.
-Todd

    Bookmark   June 29, 2005 at 10:40AM
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barrie2m_

All of the newer hybrids, especially jalopeno, seem to be very mild compared to older cultivars. But be careful to assume that all peppers from the same plant will be equal, especially if you have different hot peppers planted nearby. The seeds and inner membrane may be vastly hotter if the flower was polinated by a hotter variety or cultivar. I found out the hard way.

    Bookmark   June 29, 2005 at 1:10PM
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opqdan(z5 NE OH)

bmoser,
No, you didn't. As has been stated hundreds of times in this forum and also in the FAQ, cross pollination of peppers will not result in differences unless the seeds of the current generation are used for a new one. Peppers are an extension of the plant, much like a leaf or stem, meant for protecting and transporting the seeds. The walls and placenta (white part seeds where seeds are attached) of a pepper are made of the same genetic material as the parent plant meaning that the heat level is unaffected by the pollinator. Only the seeds contain a mix of both parents, and if planted can possibly produce a different pepper.

A hotter than normal pepper on a plant can NOT be caused by cross-pollination in the same generation. It can be caused by environmental differences and the normal variability of peppers on the same plant.

We really need to try to put this old wives tale of cross pollination to rest.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2005 at 11:39AM
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Todd_In_Texas(Zone 8A Dallas)

By the way... here are some of the peppers I picked on July 4th. The red ones on the left are all very hot jalapenos which have turned ripe red like you described. I love hot peppers but these jalapenos have even been almost too hot for me. I have to cut them thin and eat them with a bite of food.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2005 at 12:26PM
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byron(4a/5b NH)

So factor's

There are some heatless varieties.

Chiles are hotter if the blossom pollinates when the ambient temp is above 75F

Chiles are cooler if feed a lot of nitrate fertlizer.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2005 at 3:29PM
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dereckbc(7a TX)

Try roasting them whole and see if it doesn't pick up a little. If not they are duds.

    Bookmark   July 7, 2005 at 11:25AM
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bpmac112166(z7b SC)

I watched an episode of Good Eats last night. Alton Brown(gotta love him) says that peppers are hotter when they are green than when they are allowed to turn red. Also, I grew a variety of jalapeno last year called "False Alarm" that has the jalapeno flavor but none of the heat. Is there a chance you planted some of those??

    Bookmark   July 7, 2005 at 11:40AM
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willardb3

snip
I watched an episode of Good Eats last night. Alton Brown(gotta love him) says that peppers are hotter when they are green than when they are allowed to turn red.
snip

Alton Brown is full of potatos........

    Bookmark   July 7, 2005 at 12:41PM
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opqdan(z5 NE OH)

I love that show and Alton Brown is awesome, but sometimes he is only partially right. Some peppers can be hotter when green (jalapenos fall in this category, I think), but the vast majority are hotter when ripe.

    Bookmark   July 7, 2005 at 1:12PM
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HotPepperDad(arctic)

Note-roasting peppers often sweetens the taste.
I can't say for certain that it NEVER increases "hotness", but in my experience it has not.
-HPD

    Bookmark   July 9, 2005 at 1:26AM
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tomthebomb(Germany)

I have never watched Alton Brown, but any chef who says peppers are hotter when they are green(i.e. unripe) is as Willard so elegantly stated, "full of potatos"! As far as I know, there are no exceptions to this rule. What determines the heat is what has been stated before: temperature when pollinated, stress, etc.
If Alton thinks the green ones are hotter, I have a gold mine in Alabama I'd like to sell him!
Tom

    Bookmark   July 9, 2005 at 4:10AM
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byron(4a/5b NH)

There is one called Country Girl that is hotter green than yellow ripe.

    Bookmark   July 9, 2005 at 9:26AM
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HotPepperDad(arctic)

Regarding green vs ripe "hotness".
Obviously ripe fruit are sweeter, and the increased sweetness may seem to mask the heat to some.
I agree with earlier statements however, that ripeness does not usually reduce, and in some cases may increase heat.
-HPD

    Bookmark   July 9, 2005 at 3:51PM
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bpmac112166(z7b SC)

Sorry, didn't mean to get a debate going about amount of heat between green and red peppers. Was just repeating what I heard. Guess that's why Mama says "Never repeat hearsay, only what u know is fact.". I think she was referring to gossip though. Anyways, I still like watching "Good Eats" but I like eating 'good eats' even better.
Good luck with ur search for heat BKSinAZ!!!!!

    Bookmark   July 12, 2005 at 9:00PM
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christian_grower

Can you dry a green jalapeno?

    Bookmark   July 18, 2007 at 7:38PM
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fiedlermeister(04/05)

Yes you can. I have even purchased dried powdered green jalapeno.

    Bookmark   July 18, 2007 at 9:34PM
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then_then(5)

Hi there - New member here. I was scanning the web looking for answers to the same question. None of the answers thus far here have answered my particular problem so I'll ask mine as an extension of the OP's question:
I am actually growing jalapenos from the seeds of some Jalapenos I bought at the local farmers market a few years ago. They are really nice peppers, but the problem is that every year - well last year and now again this year - I have one plant out of about 6 that produces completely heat-free peppers. I know it is not the seeds since other plants from the same batch are producing hot peppers. The problem is though that this plant is producing the nicest looking peppers! Is there something I can do to reverse this? What is causing it? I used some organic fertilizer at low doses - about every 3 weeks - until the first flowers appeared. I don't water all that much and it's been a dry year... Any thoughts?

Thanks!

    Bookmark   July 23, 2007 at 12:28AM
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sahdow

I discovered this by accident, I generally buy my peppers from the nursery down the block and this year it appears they got the heatless variety in stock (none to pleased).

As far as why some peppers are hot and others not, within the same variety, it's just like anything else nature + Nurture.

Genetics can cause a hot pepper to be mild, but so can environment.

The mild Jalapenos I bought this year are getting slightly hotter with the increase in humidity brought about by the monsoon season here.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2012 at 6:30PM
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