Absolute beginner with a cutting

scott_saundersMarch 22, 2010

A friend gave me a salvia greggii cutting and told me how to put in soil. So I did that a couple of days ago and today realized that I have no idea what to do next. I know it will take three weeks or so for rooting to happen, but what else should I expect? The leaves have started to sag as though it's dying - is that normal? will the cutting turn into a dead looking twig and then come back? Or should it stay healthy looking?

Do I need to do anything other than keep the soil moist?

Thanks for any help.

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GawdinFever(z5b/St. Louis, MO)

Directly in the ground with no roots? Without roots, the cutting doesn't have a way to 'drink'. Granted some might root this way, but I haven't had much success like that.

Try this link

Here is a link that might be useful: cuttings of salvia greggii...

    Bookmark   March 23, 2010 at 2:28AM
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scott_saunders

Yes, with no roots. Isn't that what a cutting is? There are two nodes in the soil with the leaves stripped off.

Thanks for the link. I think I've done what is suggested there. My real question is about what to expect next. Should the cutting look fresh and vibrant, or will it sag? Should the leaves stay green or will they brown and fall off?

    Bookmark   March 23, 2010 at 10:24AM
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GawdinFever(z5b/St. Louis, MO)

The leaves probably will fall off. The plant gets rid of foliage it can't support in times of stress. I'd keep some kind of cover over it not only to shade it, but for humidity as well. Maybe a jug or 2 liter bottle?

    Bookmark   March 23, 2010 at 10:41AM
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scott_saunders

Thanks

    Bookmark   March 26, 2010 at 10:18AM
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Suzi AKA DesertDance Zone 9b

I tried olive tree cuttings last year and I stripped off all the leaves but one, and cut that one in half. I dipped the end in rooting hormone, and stuck them both in the ground.

It took about a month to see new leaves forming. This year they are both growing like crazy! They were in the shade, and now I plan to dig them up carefully, put them in pots in partial shade, and on a drip system so they will always have water.

    Bookmark   March 26, 2010 at 12:18PM
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jessamine_2010(9B)

Hello! I have a well rooted honeysuckle vine (5 inches tall) and a well rooted night jasmine vine (8 inches tall)- Does anyone have experience with cuttings that may be able to tell me how long it takes for a cutting to be old enough/large enough to bloom?
Thanks for listening!

    Bookmark   April 2, 2010 at 11:23AM
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pippi21(Z7 Silver Spring, Md.)

Go to your public library and check out the book called Plant Progagation by Amercian Horticultural Society's editor-in-chief Alan Toogood. It is a great book with lots of pictures showing you how plus simple instructions. I ordered one for myself from Amazon.com. Retail price is $35 but I think I bought it for around $18 or $20. It tells and shows you step-by-step instructions/along with detailed photos of how to take and grow more plants through cuttings,etc. It is well worth the money but check your library copy out first, so you can see what it is like. It'll become your plant Bible. You can spend hours looking at his book. I have so many pink page stickys in mine right now. There are other books on propagation at your libray but I think this beats the others by a long shot.

    Bookmark   April 7, 2010 at 6:12AM
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destin_gardener(8-B/9-A)

Scott, If you put the cutting in a pot, I'd recommend placing the entire pot into a large plastic bag that you can seal up, What you are trying to do is create a miniature hothouse with fairly controlled humidity. Keep this out of direct sun though. If it is in the ground, you can do something similar with a large inverted glass jar, or ever a translucent plastic container. Just remember that the temperature under the container may get too hot, adn you'll want to allow for some air circulation.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2010 at 10:52AM
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