Used wrong soil

Bill106(4)July 27, 2014

Greetings, for some inexplicable reason I transplanted my indoor winter started peppers into my outdoor containers using top soil. Stupid! At any rate it finally dawned on me that this is the reason for my smaller developed plant that will yield poorly. Is there anything I can do at this late stage to perhaps increase size and yield or do I just chalk this up to experience? All 16 plants have fruit but nowhere near the numbers.Thanks

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esox07

Looks like you are in a northern area with short growing season. If you transplant now, you will likely find that your plants will suffer transplant shock and go into a dormancy period. After that, the new soil will likely be beneficial, but the net gain might not be enough to just deal with the current potting medium for the rest of the season. If your plants are looking that they won't produce much the way they are, it can't really hurt to try to transplant them.
Do you have some photos to post showing your plants right now?

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 5:12PM
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DMForcier(8 DFW)

Bill,

You can pull your plants out of the pots and wash off the roots, then put into new soil. So long as there isn't too much foliage the plant will accept that treatment and come back.

But as above, this might not be the right time to do it. Got pics?

Dennis

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 7:11PM
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Bill106(4)

Here's a few shots, thanks for the replies

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 9:21PM
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Bill106(4)

Here's a few shots, thanks for the replies

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 9:22PM
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Bill106(4)

Here's a few shots, thanks for the replies

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 9:23PM
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Bill106(4)

Here's a few shots, thanks for the replies

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 9:24PM
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woohooman

Like Bruce said, in your zone, I'd say no. But after you showed the pics, I'd say definitely NO. For as big as a faux pas you made, they don't look bad at all. Perhaps you need to try to extend their season a bit somehow this year, and then next year, start your seeds in January like most Northerners do. Just some thoughts.

Kevin

This post was edited by woohooman on Mon, Jul 28, 14 at 2:31

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 10:23PM
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Bill106(4)

Will do and thanks Bruce and Kevin for the info.

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 7:25AM
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Mecdave Zone 8/HZ 9

Agree with Kevin 100%. Besides, If I had soil that purty I would be growing in-ground. ;)

PS Keven mentioned extending the season somehow. Consider overwintering. It would be a perfect time to re-pot (to a smaller container) and grow them inside. If space is a problem you could even go bonsai. Check out the link below. You don't have to go full bonsai in your trimming, and you can easily grow large again with them next year, giving you that head start.

Here is a link that might be useful: Fatalli's Bonsai

This post was edited by mecdave on Mon, Jul 28, 14 at 8:42

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 8:05AM
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Bill106(4)

Interesting. Thanks Mecdave

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 8:00PM
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