Rooting ACUBA?

wherewerewe(z7 NC Triad)May 26, 2006

Hello all,

I'm very interested in propagating my Acuba bushes that have gotten a little large and need to be trimmed back. I've propagated a few smaller plants in the past with decent success, but the Acuba's stems are thicker than anything I've tried before, therefore I was hoping to get some advice from you pros out there as to better my chances of successfully rooting my cuttings and sharing them with my family and fellow Gardenwebbers.

All I am familiar with, is to take semi-hard cuttings, moisten, and dip in rooting hormone, tap off excess powder, stick in moist growing medium (soil-less mix) and keep moist & in the shade for a few weeks until they develop roots. Is there anything other than the basics that would help me root these lovely plants?

Thank you for your help in advance! I'm looking forward to pulling this off if I can.

Have a great holiday weekend!

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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

Use just the terminal growth for cuttings, removing most of the leaves. I wouldn't make the cuttings any longer than 5 inches or so. They may be slow to root but this is a good time of year to strike the cuttings. Good luck!

    Bookmark   May 26, 2006 at 2:39PM
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wherewerewe(z7 NC Triad)

uh oh...I'm now going to show the extent of my propagation knowledge...

What exactly is terminal growth? Is that basically newer growth?

Slow to root huh (bummer)? As fast as they've grown, I figured they would root quickly too. About how long can I expect them to sit around while they develop their roots?

I'm guessing I just use the basic rooting hormone regimen? No special instructions?

Thanks for the tips =)

    Bookmark   May 26, 2006 at 8:24PM
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vera_eastern_wa(5a-5b)

I rooted mine (A. japonica) in plain ol' water within 2-3 weeks this time last year...stem diameter about 1". Potted up when roots were no more than 2" long and has been growing in a 6" standard pot for about a year. I brought it in over winter and stuck it back out when night temps hit 40's. Still trying to decide where to plant it!

Vera

    Bookmark   May 28, 2006 at 12:29PM
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little_dani(9, S. Tex Coast)

Acuba is very easy to propagate, just as you described. I have been wanting to root some too, thanks for reminding me.

Janie

    Bookmark   June 2, 2006 at 4:00PM
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opal52(z7b GA)

Acuba really is easy to propagate. One of our neighbors trimmed their Acuba last year and I broke off four tip ends of the trimmings about 10-15" long. Three of these I trimmed to 6-8", took off all but the top two leaves, dipped them in rooting hormone and put them in potting soil. I watched them carefully, keeping them moist and they rooted in several weeks. I didn't want to go through all that with the fourth cutting, and I didn't want to just put in the compost pile. So I stuck it in the ground in the shade garden. I watered the soil around it but did nothing else special. You can probably guess the result. All four lived, but the one I just stuck in the ground rooted itself without any help from me, and of the four is bigger healthiest looking plant. Ain't nature grand :~).

    Bookmark   June 3, 2006 at 5:16PM
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Vamptoo(7b/8a SC)

I love to experiment, I've learned so much from doing that, so I took the cuttings from my speckled Acuba and put half of them in water with some Shultz starter and the other half in potting soil with root hormone on the ends. I have 29 of each. I did them yesterday so I'll see what does what best. LOL Some days you just gotta play mad scientist.

Ok, I'll go back out and play in the dirt!

Cindy

    Bookmark   June 4, 2006 at 8:40AM
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markg00001(z7a VA USA)

I have a neighbor with a giant speckled acuba. I have arranged to take a large amount of stems to propagate aftering giving her other plant material earlier this spring.

I intend to "stick 'em in the ground" exactly where I want them to grow...just like I have done hundreds of times with cornus (dogwood), Hydrangea, Ribes, etc.

By way of example, I have about 8 red twig dogwood shrubs, 6 varigated red twig dogwood shrubs and 35 yellow twig dogwood shrubs. All are healthy and pollard/cut to within 5 inches of the ground every spring to encourage vigorous and colorful straight stem growth.

All of the shrubs were started from cuttings. All the cuttings were softwood cuttings from mature/overgrown shrubs in commercial landscaping. All of the yellow twig was from one commercial business. I got permission to trim the shrubs for free...I got to haul away all the cuttings (a pick up truck bed full).

All the cuttings had leaves removed and stems trimmed before inserting them in the location were I wanted them to grow permanently.

I deeply inserted into moist ground 12"-15" leafless stems randomly arranged in an 8"-12" diameter (8-12 stems). The first year's growth produces a small shrub because of the quantity and density of the rooted cuttings. The second year, no one believes they were sticks a year earlier(believe me, people are always amazed when I tell them).

FYI, I have about 75 Hydrangea shrubs I got for free from doing the same thing.

    Bookmark   June 15, 2006 at 8:05PM
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