Hungarian Wax Peppers

shoontokJuly 10, 2010

Hello Pepper Lovers

I just stopped by the local farmer/nursery market and just added 4 established Hungarian Wax peppers to my garden. Im not too familiar with this pepper variety. These plants are already baring yellowish/greenish peppers and the little tag that comes with them says that they are red when ripe.

I found a nice spot for them that will give them plenty of sun and in a good soil mix that i made. Im wondering how hot these things are in relation to other peppers such as Peperoncini, jalapeno, cayenne, habanero, as these are the peppers im most familar with.

These hungarian wax peppers are already 2 to 3 inches long. If they indeed turn red i guess i should wait and see.

Anybody that has any experience with these peppers that can give me a summary of what to expect would be much appreciated.

Thx.

Shoontok

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euarto_gullible(5)

They are comparable in heat to jalapenos.

    Bookmark   July 10, 2010 at 10:00PM
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tennesseegarden(6 - TN)

I love these things. I eat them when they turn yellow. But yes they are pretty hot. Their scoville rating is 5k to 10k. Jalapenos are 5k. Of course, the seeds is what makes them hot. If you remove all the seeds, they aren't too hot at all. I picked two today that were 6 to 7 inches long and grilled them. Yum.

My little plant:

    Bookmark   July 10, 2010 at 10:27PM
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wordwiz

One of my fav hot peppers (because I'm a wimp when it comes to heat!). I love to pick them when they are green/yellow, slice them and add them to hamburgers on the grill.

Mike

    Bookmark   July 10, 2010 at 11:42PM
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shoontok

Thx for the responses folks! Sounds like i made a nice addition to my pepper garden and look forward to harvesting these peppers ;)

    Bookmark   July 11, 2010 at 12:39PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

I think you'll really enjoy them, Shoon!
The peppers will gain sweetness as they ripen to a beautiful red.
I start plucking and using them when they're a bright yellow, but I
always allow a few to ripen.

The Hungarian was my first pepper - three years ago - and I still have that pepper today.
I plant it in the garden during the summer, and then I dig it up for wintering indoors. My
Hungarian produced a better crop in its second year, and it looks to have an even better
crop this year. It produces 3 - 5 pods between November and May, but they're small and I
usually pick them off to conserve the plant's energy.

The heat is mild, but it's enough to get a burn going. The heat is short-lived, however,
and stays in the mouth and on the lips (not the "backa the throat" like the super-hots).

Josh

Here is a link that might be useful: My First Pepper Season (garden pics)

    Bookmark   July 11, 2010 at 12:54PM
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wordwiz

greenman,

When I read your post, I thought you saved the "pepper" and not the plant! I pictured it hanging in a frame with a small plaque that read "My First Pepper."

Mike

    Bookmark   July 11, 2010 at 2:07PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Ha! Like the "first dollar" that many businesses frame? ;)

Yeah, I kept the whole plant! When I learned that all peppers are perennial, I immediately
took it upon myself to see just how many years I could sustain a plant.

Josh

    Bookmark   July 11, 2010 at 2:53PM
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shoontok

lol, awesome, cant wait to harvest one of these peppers and many more. I dont think im gonna save it over the winter unless i paint up with some shellac and polyurethane, lol

I might try and bring a Habanero plant inside overwinter on the windowsill with grow light help tho. Them Habs are slow in developing for me.

    Bookmark   July 12, 2010 at 9:53PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Over winter, I put mine in a sunny windowsill, and it works great! ;)
The long, glum days of winter are hard for peppers, so the more light, the better.
Here's my Hungarian, January 16, 2010:

Josh

    Bookmark   July 12, 2010 at 11:03PM
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shoontok

Yep, i just picked one today after work and bit into it raw and yes it does have a bit of burn, lol. It was still light green/yellowish too, damnit im colorblind and have trouble determining certain color shades but it definetlty wasnt orange or red, lol. I have one of them that is turning orange too. im letting that one grow some more. The plants are still small and still acclimating to my garden but i do see signs of new flower buds emerging and the plants look healthy :)

    Bookmark   July 19, 2010 at 4:58PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Sweet!
I picked one this afternoon, yellow-green in color.
It definitely isn't ripe, but it's full-size and was beginning to sag downward.
The sooner you begin picking pods, the faster the other pods/flowers will develop.
I'll be eating mine in a few minutes.

Josh

    Bookmark   July 19, 2010 at 8:13PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Just ate the Hungarian....

I took a bite fresh to assess the flavor - sweetish, bell flavor with only a mild heat -
then I sliced the rest of the pod into rings.

I filled one square of a sauce-tray with Balsamic Garlic vinegar and olive oil; another with
Jack Daniel's Barbecue sauce; and a third with a spicy Apricot-Mango chutney.

The vinegar and oil was aromatic, but didn't absorb well into the pepper. Too light a flavor.
The barbecue, on the other hand, was too strong and sweet a flavor, which ended up masking the pepper.
The chutney was the best - the sweet fruit flavor complimented the pepper, and the heat
from the chiles in the chutney accentuated the early-season heat of the Hungarian.
That's my unsolicited review ;)

Josh

    Bookmark   July 19, 2010 at 9:11PM
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shoontok

Nice! Enjoy Josh! them peppers are good.

I got the night off from watering, it seems that a few rainstorms finally came through today dumping about a inch or so of rain, i think maybe we got 2 inches of rain in the last whole month.

Between rainstorms i went to the farmer market and picked up 4 Serrano plants, lol. I love them peppers! Never grew Serrano's yet but im psyched to try em ;) Think im up to 7 or 8 or so varieties of peppers groing in various beds around the yard now ;)

Got a great deal at the market too since im a regular there and they just want to move out there stuff at this point in the season, payed one dollar for 4 plants. and one dollar for 8 cuke plants that need a lil nursing back to health. Gotta love them privately owned markets instead of them mega marts. Support the locals!

    Bookmark   July 19, 2010 at 9:21PM
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sue5100

The Hot Wax peppers are one of my favs. A very high producers, it can be hotter than the Jalapeno pepper. Many people think that all the heat from peppers is in the seeds but it is really in the veins of the pepper.
My Mom used these peppers for her hot stew many years ago, best stew ever!

    Bookmark   July 20, 2010 at 3:11PM
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f1ferrari02

Here is a couple pics of my hungarian wax peppers. Red peppers is when they are mature and they gain their heat. Yellow peppers have less heat. Great peppers for stuff and roasting!!!!!
[URL=http://img22.imageshack.us/i/hungarianwax.jpg/][IMG]http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/325/hungarianwax.jpg[/IMG][/URL]
[URL=http://img25.imageshack.us/i/hungarianwax1.jpg/][IMG]http://img25.imageshack.us/img25/435/hungarianwax1.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

Uploaded with [URL=http://imageshack.us]ImageShack.us[/URL]

    Bookmark   July 21, 2010 at 11:37AM
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misfits0311

This is my 1st post guys. I think I read somewhere that these peppers can been harvested when ripe, sun dried, and ground to make paprika. Is there any truth to that? I have one in a 10" pot right now that has about 4 peppers and I've been wondering what to do with it.

    Bookmark   July 24, 2010 at 10:46PM
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nitti610

Hello people! This is my first time growing Hungarian wax peppers. It has been extremely hot and dry in Philly. I have 6 hungarian wax plants and all of them have LOTS of peppers. Most are about 2" long right now, but there are quite a few that are 4-5" long, 1 1/2" in diameter and they have been this way for weeks. They don't seem to be growing or changing color. They are a bright yellow color right now. Everything I read says they should be orange or red when ripe (hot) and 6-8" long. They did have purple marks on them ,but that has faded. Should I pick the big ones and hope the others grow better? Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanx guys
Frankie

    Bookmark   August 10, 2010 at 9:25PM
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coastal-tony(S Florida #10)

I'm glad I looked at this thread. I did not know that these guys are perennials. I just fed them and checked them out. They are LOADED with buds. I hope our 90 degree afternoons will let them blossom. Can I upload pix from my computer, or do I need a URL?

    Bookmark   August 12, 2010 at 2:19PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

You need the url (html code) from an online host.

As long as your blossoms stay moist, they should set fruit.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 12, 2010 at 3:45PM
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shoontok

These pepper plants that i have only grew peppers to maybe 3 inches so far. The plants were quite small due to being constricted in the little 4 pack nursery thingies. But since i planted em in the ground over a month ago they have grew a bit and have put out another set of blossoms after i picked the 3 inch light green peppers, and some of them were even smaller but were starting to turn orange. They all had a bit of heat, comparable to a Jalapeno maybe a bit hotter.

Looks like ill have a few more to pick in the coming weeks as they are blossoming quite nicely over the past two weeks and have set quite a few fruits so far.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 2:14PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Same here, Shoon!

Hungarians average 3 - 5 inches for me.

When the first crop of peppers set, I plucked the peppers from the top of the plant.
Now the lower pods are beginning to ripen, and new flowers are forming at the top of the plant,
along with new growth to support the fruit. Don't forget to lightly fertilize your plants.
They need nutrients consistently. Not bloom boosting gimmicky products, but real nutrients.

Definitely better flavor than a Jalapeño (in my opinion), and usually hotter, too.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 2:51PM
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nitti610

I'm new to this. This is the first year I've grown anything. I am LOVING IT!!! I guess I've been reading too many peoples opinions and not fact. Is there any truth to this, "pepperoncini are immature hungarian wax peppers"?

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 5:45PM
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stquack

I too love Hungarian Wax Peppers! I mix them with pickles to spice them up a little.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 7:01PM
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shoontok

Nitti610, Im almost absolutely sure that pepperoncini and hungarian wax are two seperate breeds. Im growing both of them this year and they are totally different in plant structure, pepper structure and taste.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 7:14PM
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charlesnyc

definitely two different varieties. 100% sure on that one.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 7:41PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Yep, I agree, completely different plants.
In fact, it just so happens I took pictures of both plants this morning. Two pics of each.
The Pepperoncini is growing in mottled sun/shade, so it's hard to get a good pic. There are
at least 16 pods on the plant right now, and many of them are full-sized. This is a two year-old
plant that survived in the garage this winter. Producing much better this year.

First up, the Hungarian. This is a three year-old plant.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 15, 2010 at 10:26PM
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nitti610

Thanx for all the info guys. I'm going to take a shot and pick some of these bigger ones off the plants. There are about 15 @ this point. I noticed a few got soft and mushy at the end. I'm assuming they are over ripening. There are dozens of blossoms and 1/2" peppers that should start growing once I pick the bigger ones. As soon as I figure out how to post pics, I'll do that as well.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 7:44AM
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sandhill_farms(10 NV)

I wrote the following on the vegetable forum about how to post pictures:

Everyone today has a digital camera that they use to take snaps of their families - vacations - etc. To view them you most often download them to your computer so you already have half the battle won. To get them to the point of putting them here on GW is as follows:

First they must be uploaded to a photo hosting site. I use Photobucket as it's extremely simple and is free so I'll use them as an example. Once you sign-up and become a member you need to upload the pictures you want to post in to Photobucket. Create an album and assign it whatever name you want to call it, say "Garden." You'll see a button in the center of the screen called "Upload Images And Videos." Click on that button and a small window will open that has the contents of your computer in it. You want to go to wherever you keep your pictures and select the ones you want to post in GW. Then hit the "Open" button and the pictures will begin to upload to your album in Photobucket. Once they're there it's easy to put them in your post. Just go to the picture you want and hold your cursor over it. This will open a drop-down window below your picture that has various codes:

Email & IM
Direct Link
HTML Code
IMG Code

Highlight the HTML Code, press and hold the Ctrl key on your keyboard while you press the letter C. This cuts the HTML code that you need to put your picture in your post. Now go to the message you want to post in GW. Put your cursor in your message body where you want to place the picture. Now you want to Paste the HTML Code in your message. To do this you press and hold the Ctrl key on your keyboard and then hit the letter V. This will place the code in your message body. To check and see your picture push the "Preview Message" button and there it is.

So now you know how to post pictures in your posts on GW. If you're having a problem with your plants and want some help, go out and snap a picture or two. This will greatly help others who wish to help you and make sure that you're getting the most accurate help.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 9:16AM
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nitti610

IMG_9026.JPG
hopefully that worked. I'm attempting to upload pics from my iPhone

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 1:13PM
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sandhill_farms(10 NV)

nitti610 - you "First" have to upload your pictures to a photo hosting site and then provide a link to them in your post. In my example above that would be the HTML code that you would cut and paste here.

Greg
Southern Nevada

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 1:51PM
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nitti610

Lol, I thought I could get away with copying and pasting to the message. It usually works. I'll have to create a photobucket account. Thanx Greg

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 2:31PM
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nitti610

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 5:27PM
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nitti610



these are two different Hungarian plants. As you can see the fruit stays pretty small. Well, small compared to pics I've seen of other peoples plants. I do have one plant that is producing bigger peppers. I'll have to get a pic of it up for you.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 5:58PM
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nitti610


This is the plant I just picked from. All of these plants are growing in the same conditions, origionally same size, & purchased at the same time. One sets big (5") fruit, the others don't.

here you can see the difference in fruit size from the different plants

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 6:09PM
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nitti610

All of my plants are on my roof in Philly. Mist of my neighbors think I'm absolutely out of my mind but I am enjoying growing all these veggies

    Bookmark   August 16, 2010 at 6:12PM
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nitti610

Well I have finally eaten some of the Hungarians that I thought were undersized and not ripe. They were SMOKIN' HOT! I didn't expect that. I thought they were mild, in the same league as jalepenos! They are definetly much HoTTER than anything in my garden. A pleasant surprise!

    Bookmark   August 26, 2010 at 9:33AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Haha! Yes, definitely hotter than most Jalapas!

Nitti, did the pods in the pic above eventually ripen?
It looks as though they had streaks of sunburn/color...
that's never affected the final pod color, in my experience.

I should have ripe pods shortly.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 26, 2010 at 1:37PM
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nitti610

Yes, the purple sun scorch faded away and the peppers turned a yellow/orange color.
Another surprise was they were hot from stem to tip. Usually the hot peppers turn up the heat as u get closer to the seeds at the top end. Not these babys. The first little experimental nibble was just as hot as the seed. Love it! I have trimmed down the plants foliage after the last harvest and I have an incredible amount of new buds and tiny peppers. Someone suggested pruning some leaves on the lower section after picking a batch and it worked. I will be over wintering a couple of these Hungarians.
Question: is it best to over winter the ones that have produced good yields or the ones that didn't? I saw a comment u made somewhere about the 2nd year being much better as far as production. Does it matter how well the plant did the first year?

    Bookmark   August 26, 2010 at 4:15PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Very good!
The more you pick, the more it'll produce.

I would choose a plant that produced well this year, although I don't think it matters.
The runts will certainly do better in their second year, but I don't think they're worth the energy.

After a heavy crop, and toward the end of the season, my plants will look a bit yellow and deficient.
It is important to send plants into the winter as healthy as possible, so I make sure to fertilize my
re-potted plants and provide them as much light as I can on sunny Autumn days. I fertilize very lightly,
so that I can fertilize more frequently - once or twice a month, reduced does.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 26, 2010 at 8:27PM
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shoontok

Wow, i bought those stunted plants on July 10th, seems like along time ago but only 6 weeks i guess. Time sure does go slow when your waiting for peppers to pop.

After picking them first few peppers the plants grew nicely over the last 6 weeks and got some much larger peppers on them now and more blooms and many little peppers setting.

And thx to Josh's inspiration i think im gonna winterize one of these indoors :)

I might just pick them non-ripe large peppers this weekend for eating this weekend and let them little guys have a chance to grow.

    Bookmark   August 27, 2010 at 9:21PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

They do seem to take forever...!

But they're well worth the wait. I've been staring at these peppers for a long time.... ;)

Josh

    Bookmark   August 27, 2010 at 10:20PM
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nitti610

Lol, that's awesome Josh! I would not have the patients to wait for those to turn like u have. Seems like u posted those origional pics months ago but it's only a couple weeks. They look good now.

Shoontok, I will be doing the same (overwintering). You are in NY correct?

    Bookmark   August 28, 2010 at 6:32AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Thanks!
Maybe another week until all the pods are red....
but I know I can't wait that long! As soon as I get a good picture taken, I'm ready to harvest.
Seldom have I ever had a plant completely covered in ripe pods. Impatience always gets the best of me! ;)
I'll probably eat the ripest pod when I go out to the garden this morning.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 28, 2010 at 1:15PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

The peppers were so inviting that I had to eat one....
Not the hottest Hungarian I've had - although the second half was obviously hotter than the first! ;)
Pod was a bit on the small side, and not fully ripe either. Perfect luster, and a great flavor!

Josh

    Bookmark   August 28, 2010 at 2:39PM
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shoontok

LOL Josh. Them peppers look good. So far today ive held off picking any. All I did today was water and fertilize a bit.

Although im going out the garden again soon to harvest some pepperoncini's for pickling and one nice cuke and a watermelon for the kids. Ill try to keep the harvesting scissors away from my Hungarian Waxes even tho some of the peppers are 5 to 6 inches long but still yellow.

    Bookmark   August 28, 2010 at 3:10PM
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shoontok

Sunamabish. I just found what appeared to be a one inch hornworm or other caterpillar with his head burrowed into the base of a flower bud on one of my hungarian waxes! He took a swim in my manure tea/fertilizer bucket.

I did some more stake and tying rigging to support them leaning plants. Guess ill have to take some photos of the clusterphuck area i got my Hungarian's growing ;)

Ive got them planted in front of a small raised bed i made that contains pepperoncini, choked out habs, basil and one cherry tomato plant. Also i squeezed some serrano's in there and oh yeah, one yellow bell. and one watermelon plant on each side of the box, lol. I just picked a watermelon the size of a basketball but it was all pink inside and the seeds were still white, i guess it is one of them varieties that gets really big cause i forgot what type of seeds i purchased.

Next year im putting my main focus on peppers and plant around them. Out of all the the veggies im growing in this first year of gardening i think my favorite is peppers for sure.

The good thing is that the Hungarians are out in the front of the box and get the most sun and arent getting choked out as much as the other poor plants.

Jim

    Bookmark   August 28, 2010 at 8:02PM
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shoontok

Here are some photos with the Kodak camera i found. Still learning the settings so sorry about the quality.

The Cluster "F"

A couple Hungarians.

A couple more.

About a 6 inch pepper still yellow.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2010 at 8:47PM
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shoontok

dam. I posted on this thread 3 days ago? it feels like a week and a half. Them Hungarians still not turning orange but they are good size. I'll repost with pics at harvest time.

Josh yer gonna be proud of me lol.

Im harvesting pepperoncini out the wazoo (at 2.5 to 3 inches) for pickling, but my "Hot" peppers are slow as heck to ripen. Namely Jalapeno, Cayenne, Hungarian Wax and Habanero. I gave up on my Hot Cherry peppers, i kind of planted them in a bad spot and dont get much direct sun. But they are really healthy looking and ill probably winterize one for the heck of it.

Jim

    Bookmark   September 1, 2010 at 10:16PM
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nitti610

Hey Jim,
About how big are your hot cherry peppers & are they turning red? I have 72 hot cherry's on the plant that are about 1" in diameter and turning red. I always thought they should be double that size. All the cheesesteak joints up here have the cherrys on the side and all are at least 2".
Sorry guys, I know this is a Hungarian wax thread but I had to ask

    Bookmark   September 2, 2010 at 9:01AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Howdy, Jim!

That's a nice little garden you got there!
A bit congested, though, wouldn't you say? ;)

The Hot Peppers in my patch are slow to ripen, as well.
Thai chilis are the fastest; then the Hungarians; Arbol; and finally the super Hots.

I can't wait to see everyone's harvest. Should be an exciting array of shape and color.

Josh

    Bookmark   September 2, 2010 at 9:43AM
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shoontok

Heya's

Nitti, i dont have any Hot cherry peppers growing. All of the flowers simply fall off. Not sure if its cause its lack of sun or what. They only get partial, spotty sunlight. I harvested two peppers early on in the season before the wall of tomato plants bursted up in front of them. Next year I'll pay more attention to plant types and plant peppers on the sunny side of tomato's. The two i did harvest were about a 1 inch diameter and a 1.5 inch diameter, i did pick em green cause they stopped had minimal growth for weeks. And yes they were quite hot tho. Nitti thats awesome you got 72 peppers on one plant!
Josh, yes that raised bed is a mess, lol. I think i tried squeezing too much stuff in there ;) Its a learnin experience. I will try to space things out better next year, maybe do some potted peppers so i can move them around if need be. I did pick another 30-40 pepperoncini again today, i dont bother counting them anymore :) And last but not least Im still refraining from picking any of those immature but nice size Hungarian Wax peppers. Ill be sure to take some photos of Hot Pepper harvest if they ever ripen :)

Jim

    Bookmark   September 2, 2010 at 8:17PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Jim,
would you mind sending me an e-mail?
I have some pics that I'd like to send to you.
Thanks,

Josh

    Bookmark   September 4, 2010 at 2:22PM
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shoontok

I was countin out my life savin's on the cuttin board and then i dumped some garden pickin's on there.
There be one of them there not ripened Hungarian peppers on there.

Im darn proud of my fresh grown garden produce. I did want to wait longer to pick that big pepper but it was danglin low on the pepper plant and was touchin the dirt. i figgered i go ahead and pick it and stuff it with some cheese and such, maybe topper off with a slice of bacon and bake it up for an appetizer.

Them two baby pepperoncini were dirt danglers too. seems new branches formin down low on them plants right at the dirt level. them baby peppers draggin down them baby branches. Few more weeks for pepper growin up here in the northlands and then it time to harvest all and select the proud few pepper plants to be trimmed down and winter on the windowsill.

Happy peppering
Jim

    Bookmark   September 7, 2010 at 7:56PM
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nitti610

The Hungarians are still my best producers. These are pics from today. This will be the 3rd harvest. The first two times I picked them prematurely. I had them exposed to searing heat and most had sun scald. Not this time! These are staying on the plant until they turn red or I get dangerously close to first frost. I'm glad I chose this pepper. The heat is perfect for me (I'm a hot pepper lightweight), and the flavor is excellent.
Hopefully I can keep them alive all winter in my overwintering attempt.


The cherry peppers have done well too. I think I'll try to keep this one alive.

    Bookmark   September 8, 2010 at 7:59PM
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nitti610

Hey Josh, I know you are an expert. Why the different foliage in the way our plants look? Mine & Jim's look bushy, lots of foliage. Yours looks taller, bigger leaves, and not very bushy. Is this the difference in fertilizers or something to do with sun exposure or some other act of nature? Any idea?

    Bookmark   September 8, 2010 at 8:06PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Thanks, but I don't consider myself an expert!

Hot, dry California, zero summer rain, very little fertilizer,
grown in-ground in mixed sun/shade....

Josh

    Bookmark   September 8, 2010 at 8:49PM
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nitti610

Well, your humility is admirable but you are much more seasoned than I am. You have helped me immensely. This website has walked me through my first year growing.
Well, I'm sure you already know, I'll be pestering you with questions as the seasons wind down. Thank you for all the help!

    Bookmark   September 8, 2010 at 9:45PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Thank you, again!
This is only my third year growing peppers, so I don't have much past experience...
I'm pretty confident in my techniques, but my range is still limited.

I enjoy the opportunity to interact with other growers, and to encourage new growers.
Shortly after coming across the bonsai chile growing guide, I began exploring the
pepper Forum. Some of the pics posted by Willard convinced me to give the pruning
and re-potting a try.

Josh

    Bookmark   September 9, 2010 at 2:46AM
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shoontok

Nitti. Them Hungarian plants look alot better then mine! i think yer doin a fine job man.

I just looked back at when i first started this post (July 10th. Thats when i transplanted them from the little nursery pots. Definitely i must get them in the ground earlier next yer. Cause mine are started to bloom up a storm now and the season coming to an end in a few weeks. It was damn hot and dry in NY this summer too. Majority of the summer was in the 90's and up. And very little rain.

I think sunlight and temps have alot to do with the pepper producing? My hot cherry peppers dont get much sun and havent produced anything. The Bell peppers im thinking didnt do good cause of the high heat causing blossoms to drop. The Pepperoncini were kickin arse all summer. Maybe different plants handle different conditions better then others?

    Bookmark   September 9, 2010 at 5:06PM
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nitti610

Thank you Jim! It's pretty funny how I got started. My wife bought a kit called ,"my first garden" for our 5 & 4 year olds. She dis not follow instructions and just packed multiple seeds in every hole she dug. Well, wee ended up with these monster plants in a few weeks. I started to take notice of other plants in the nursery section of lowes. I bought cherry hots, Hungarians ,jalapeño , & cowhorn. Almost every plant that wasn't a Hungarian was tiny and sorry looking. I am an engineer for a huge produce comapany, so I started taking empty 55gallon drums that used to contain citric acid. I cut them down and used them as containers for all the plants. All I did was water regularly, try to shade them from the searing heat in Philly and listen to Josh and these things (Hungarians) went ape sh*t! They have been growing non stop and producing like crazy. I will definetly be planning my garden next year. I'll have a head start after my overwintering attempt (hopefully)! I learned most of what to do by listening to u guys. A few weeks ago I didn't know that pepperoncini and Hungarian were different plants. I have a lot to learn. This forum is awesome!
Frank

    Bookmark   September 9, 2010 at 8:24PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Frank and Jim, I can't wait to see how you guys expand your production next season!
You'll be sketching tentative planting layouts and container schemes before you know it ;)
And then the borderline-obsessive procurement of ever more exotic pepper seeds....

Josh

    Bookmark   September 9, 2010 at 8:52PM
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nitti610

Josh,
I already ordered a case of bhut jolokia. Lol! I am an engineer for a produce packing company in Philly. We get any and everything under the sun and package it for the big chain supermarkets. I had one of the sales reps order me a case of bhuts so I can pick out all the ripe ones and save their seeds. I don't have the b*lls to eat them ,but I'll be growing them. :)
I've already laid out plans for a small greenhouse indoors! Yea, I'm getting a little psycho already! Again, partially your fault, lol!
Once I get them, I'd be happy to send both you guys some seeds. I know u had an issue with mixed up bhut seeds. Let me know if you're interested. I'll keep u posted on the bhuts. I'll be tracking their movements tommorow! Lol!

    Bookmark   September 9, 2010 at 10:47PM
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evangelion

Hi all, My first post here so please be gentle!

Growing Hungarian Hot wax for the first time this year, central to the UK, and besides a glorious june, with temperatures in the 90's, the rest of the summer was a bit of a wash-out.

Besides the Hungarian, I've grown a half dozen Scotch Bonnets, Habanero's, Jalapeno's, and a couple of Bell Peppers ... most have still to ripen off which I'm thinking is getting very late now, and even though most were grown in mini-greenhouses, and in a couple of cases while we were still experiencing late frosts to boot, they STILL need more time!

Anyways without further ado, here's the Hungarian! hope the linky works!!

My first question, what would be my best option for over-wintering? i understand Chilli peppers don't like central heating, which is pretty much the norm here, would it survive Ok in a garage, raised off the floor, and covered in a plant fleece? or would the sub-zero temperature we experience here still manage to kill it off?

Any replies/help appreciated!

    Bookmark   September 10, 2010 at 9:43AM
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nitti610

Hi evangelion,
Im going to make my first attempt at overwintering as well. From everything I can gather, they should be kept in a sunny window inside the house. I'm pretty sure if you read back on this post, you will find all the links and info you need. I believe greenman28's post was called "Hungarian second overwintering" or overwintering "! Good luck!
P. S, great looking plant!

    Bookmark   September 10, 2010 at 2:27PM
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shoontok

Hey Josh, Yes i have been sketching plans in my head for the past few weeks for next years pepper plantings lol, also have been thinking about which plants im gonna attempt to overwinter indoors for quite some time (definetly a Hungarian Wax ). And damn right on the obsession to procure seeds too, lol, just last night i was looking online at various sites just to see what kind of seeds and prices are out there ;) Damn Josh you know me like a book.

Nitti, I would definetly love some of those Bhut seeds!

Evangelion, welcome to the hot pepper forum and thats a nice Hungarian Wax plant u got there! Im in the same boat as you are about wanting to save one of these plants over the winter. From what i gather you have to prune the plant way down and maybe even goin as far as pruning the roots down if ya want to put it in a small pot on a sunny windowsill. Like Nitti said, there are some other threads on overwintering plants.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2010 at 5:05PM
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evangelion

Aha! prune the roots back also, that hadn't occured to me and makes more sense than having a monster pot on the kitchen window sill all winter! lol

Cheers! :-)

    Bookmark   September 10, 2010 at 11:45PM
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shoontok

Wow, i posted pictures on Aug. 29th of my Hungarian Wax peppers and now almost a month later they still arent ripe, lol.

They have gotten bigger both in the size of peppers and plant size and number of new pods but no ripeness!

I bet some of the peppers on there are equal in mass and weight to bell peppers.

Just a lil more patience! Im thinking that Hungarian Wax is gonna be my favorite pepper this year.

10 day forecast on weather channel says there isnt any frost in sight for next 10 days, so im good to go for now.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2010 at 8:57PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

Posted by nitti610 (My Page) on Wed, Sep 8, 10 at 20:06

"Hey Josh, I know you are an expert. Why the different foliage in the way our plants look? Mine & Jim's look bushy, lots of foliage. Yours looks taller, bigger leaves, and not very bushy. Is this the difference in fertilizers or something to do with sun exposure or some other act of nature? Any idea?"

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 10:51AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Already answered in my September 8, 2010 reply. Why are you copy & pasting this?
Do you have an actual question, or are you just being obnoxious?

Josh

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 11:19AM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

Low light levels. I have some jalapeno in ground in an area that has not much sun and I get a good harvest but I noticed they have big leaves and are taller. There is NOTHING the grower can do, it is about the light levels.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 11:31AM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

"Why are you copy & pasting this?"

I noticed that sun exposure is huge. I have plants that look different that are in different areas, sun and half sun. I wanted to make it clear it is not the grower, but the weather.

I was searching Hungarian Wax Peppers and this just came up. I may try Hungarian Wax.

"Do you have an actual question, or are you just being obnoxious?"

What? Greenman, I dont have a question, nor am I trying to be "obnoxious"!?!?!?

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 11:55AM
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esox07 (4b)

I have three Sweet Banana Peppers growing in containers. They get a lot of direct sunlight. They are shorter, bushier and produce quite well. I have 5 in an above ground garden that gets only a few hours of direct sun but lots of indirect sun. They are taller, less densely foliated, have bigger leaves but seem to produce equally well. Of course soils are different but they get very similar nutrient feedings. Not sure if it is the sun exposure, the type of growing medium or the "containers" that they are in but there is a difference between the two groups.
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 11:56AM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

"Do you have an actual question, or are you just being obnoxious?"

Greenman,

What would make you think I would ever have a question for you?

You keep saying how little growing I have done in many topics and posts, and keep giving advice to many. It is clear by the pics of your peppers you grow you clearly can not grow, nor would never think anyone should ever take your advice. I was holding off on saying that, but with the many comments directed at me I have to make it clear to viewers you give advice with no experience. Everyone take a look at greenmans peppers then take a look at mine.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 1:36PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

It seems the only way Greenman responds to anything if he can say something bad about me.

Greenman you asked why I posted that, then I answered:
"Low light levels. I have some jalapeno in ground in an area that has not much sun and I get a good harvest but I noticed they have big leaves and are taller. There is NOTHING the grower can do, it is about the light levels."

It seems like because you can not find something bad to say to me you now choose to not respond.

When you showed me the myth of bloom boosters and I agreed, you then choose to not respond because I agreed. It seems if I did not agree you would then respond with something to make fun of me about and why I am wrong.

You are looking at some debates I have had in the past like "why container dont need holes" and I said you stated wrong info in that post. If I have said anything like that in the past it was for sake of argument.

I made it clear before that it is the light levels that would cause that, but I could bet because I said "you can't grow", which is not true, you now will respond with remarks about me. You said in the container forum many time about how I don't know anything and I am just saying how could you say that, greenman? You have seen my peppers I thought they were good? I have seen you grow very nice plants, I hate to think because of my rude ways in the past the only way you will respond to me is if you have a way of making fun of me.

MG

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 1:52PM
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capoman(5a)

MG, why not take it offline to e-mail directly rather then ranting on the forums here? I would have e-mailed you, but your e-mail option is not enabled. These are friendly forums. Let's keep it that way.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 4:19PM
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esox07 (4b)

I am with Capoman on this one.
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 4:26PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

I am sorry guys. I will keep this a friendly place at your request. Greenman has every right to think I was trying to be obnoxious, but I really was not. I clearly did not mean anything I said about greenman not being able to grow, or what ever I said. It is very clear that is not the case at all. Greenman has increased my plant knowledge overall.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 6:04PM
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esox07 (4b)

Accepted.

Now, this is a Hot Hungarian Wax thread so, in that light, I want to hear other's thoughts on this variety. I grew them as a mistake last year thinking I was getting Banana Peppers. Well, I wound up making lemonade out of lemons. I got a great recipe for cold canning them from Shoontook on this list and I eat them on every sandwich I make at home...until I run out of them. Just the right heat and consistency for my taste. They are one of my favorites. Not that have tried all that many though.
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 7:15PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Let's all take a deep breath, indeed.

For the sake of this fine pepper community, and out of respect for Jim's Thread, we'll stay civil.

Cody, I haven't been home. I was renewing my CPR certification for the start of school tomorrow.
Let me explain why I was suspicious of your first posting to this Thread. First, this is a two year-old
Thread; second, you copy & pasted a question I had already answered, without offering any new comment
or question in your post; and third, your past behavior, coupled with my recent intolerance. Those things
combined caused me to be suspicious of your post as nothing more than trolling. In light of the very strange
subsequent posts you made today, I don't think I was that far off the mark.

I hope you can see where I'm coming from.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 8:21PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Bruce,
the Hungarian Wax is a great versatile pepper for sure, and anyone would be lucky to "accidentally"
grow one ;-) The only problem I have is that I never grow enough to do what I want with them - this year,
I hope to actually make a Hungarian gulash soup from the peppers. I'd also like to make Paprika powder.

Josh

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 8:27PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

Greenman,

"I hope you can see where I'm coming from."

I do see yes. It just seemed like when we talked about bloom fertilizers and you made me relieze that they are a myth, I then agreed, but then you never responded then either. A few other times I said something positive about the info I learned from you in a topic and you still did not respond then either.

Even though I may have been argumentative in the past, I speek the truth when I say I have learned tons and tons of great information from you, the bloom fertilizer myth being a really big one.

The upside- is now I did bring this 2 year old topic up again :)

Never grew Hungarian Wax, would like to try, along with bell peppers too.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2012 at 9:25PM
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capoman(5a)

Hungarian wax is one of my favorites and is a staple for me. I use it in everything, especially fresh such as in salads. Problem is, I can't taste the heat anymore. Some days I wish I hadn't played with the superhots since peppers I really like like Hungarian and Jalapeno taste as if they have no heat anymore. But at least now, I can taste that awesome citrus/smoke flavor of the superhots...

    Bookmark   August 15, 2012 at 3:01PM
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esox07 (4b)

A true Pepper Junkie.
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 15, 2012 at 4:53PM
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peppernovice

Capoman=my hero! I hope to someday taste something other than mind blowing heat when I sample a super hot. Notice I did not say "eat" a super hot. I haven't been able to attain that lofty goal yet.

Tim

    Bookmark   August 15, 2012 at 6:01PM
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TheMasterGardener1(5B)

Capoman,

Citrus/smoke is a great discription. These little thai I grew are just really hot, and they have a citrus/salty flavor, then the burn! ;)

About the Wax Peppers; I really do want to try growing them along with maybe Pepperoncini and can or pickle them. They do go good in salad, or even on a cheese steak!!! :)

    Bookmark   August 15, 2012 at 8:51PM
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capoman(5a)

Well, I may have to go on a pepper strike, anyway. My wife likes heat, but thinks I make everything far too hot, and I would like to enjoy the hungarians and jalapenos again.

But then how else will I clear out my sinuses or get an endorphin rush?

I may be a pepper junkie, but I don't eat whole superhots. I have eaten halfs before though for the fun. But what I really do is just incorporate it into foods and drinks. I love the way superhots like Bhuts warm the back of your throat rather then burn the tip of your tongue and lips like cayennes or similar do. It's weird how they affect you differently.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2012 at 3:35PM
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capoman(5a)

An example of what I do: If I make a spaghetti sauce, that my wife will eat I put one whole ghost pepper in. If it's for me, I'll put 2 or occasionally 3 max to a pot. So I'm not that crazy. If I make a Bloody Caesar (Bill are you really Canadian??), I'll put in a half dozen rings of about 1/8" thick instead of Tabasco.

So I like heat. But I'm not crazy (@,@)

    Bookmark   August 16, 2012 at 3:45PM
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esox07 (4b)

I can't even imagine spaghetti sauce with one ghost pepper in it.
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 16, 2012 at 6:35PM
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capoman(5a)

You don't eat them Bruce?

Man, if you go all that effort to grow them, you gotta at least be able to say you actually eat them....They are not as bad as you would think.The heat is much more tolerable and the flavor comes out when you cook them in something. The heat on the back of the throat is like a nice hot toddy!

    Bookmark   August 16, 2012 at 11:10PM
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esox07 (4b)

Nope, you ain't gonna con me into doing something I will regret. :)
Bruce

    Bookmark   August 17, 2012 at 1:33AM
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rdback(Z6 VA)

Posted by greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a (My Page) on
Tue, Aug 14, 12 at 20:27

Bruce,
the Hungarian Wax is a great versatile pepper for sure, and anyone would be lucky to "accidentally"
grow one ;-) The only problem I have is that I never grow enough to do what I want with them - this year,
I hope to actually make a Hungarian gulash soup from the peppers. I'd also like to make Paprika powder.

Now Josh, don't yell at me for reviving this thread lol. I've always liked this thread and I was wondering if you ever made the soup. If so, you got a recipe?

And, to be totally honest, I sometimes start at the oldest threads and read forward, looking for something that shouldn't be lost. I think this thread qualifies.

Rick

This post was edited by rdback on Thu, Dec 5, 13 at 14:00

    Bookmark   December 5, 2013 at 12:34PM
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esox07 (4b)

Glad to see it come back Rick as the HHW is one of my favorites.
Bruce

    Bookmark   December 5, 2013 at 2:04PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

As a matter of fact, I DID make a nice Goulash (and misspelled the name, too, hehe)! Thanks, Rick and Bruce :-) I got the recipe from somewhere, and then I just used the Hungarian Wax peppers and the paprika powder + the dried Hungarian powder/flakes from my own stock. Here's the basic write-up that I did:

"Hungarian Goulash - beef pepper stew :-)

Chuck beef, beefstock, onion, potato, carrot, Hungarian hot wax pepper, parsley, caraway seed, garlic, paprika, olive oil, seasalt and black ground pepper to taste.Olive oil or bacon fat in pot, low cook the onions until translucent, salt to make tender. Add cut beef, sear all sides, add beefstock and water about one inch above the beef. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until meat is tender - could take 1 to 2 hours. Bring back up to a boil, add potato, carrot, pepper, caraway seed, paprika powder, and the parsley bunch (tied with butcher's twine). Reduce heat, simmer until vegetables are properly cooked. Salt and pepper to taste."

    Bookmark   December 5, 2013 at 7:50PM
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esox07 (4b)

Boy, I am glad I ate dinner a couple hours ago. That looks good. Really good.

    Bookmark   December 5, 2013 at 10:06PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

I am hooked.

After reading the comments and discussions. I think I will grow HW next season. I find it a better substitute for both Jalapeno and Serrano : I am not a big fan of Jalap. HW has the meat of Jalap and the heat of Serrano. I like peppers that I can eat them right off of the plant, from early on til it ripens. I have also have seeds for pepperoncini.

    Bookmark   December 6, 2013 at 1:51AM
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rdback(Z6 VA)

Yeah baby, that's what I'm talking about!

Well done Josh, thanks for sharing.

Long live the HHW!

Rick

    Bookmark   December 6, 2013 at 9:57AM
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esox07 (4b)

Seyson: I find the HHW to be a relatively mild pepper. I have not eaten a Serrano, but I beleive they are not that hot. I also don't think they are as hot as Jalapenos from my experience. I am by no means a fire eater. I prefer to get my capsicum in small doses by eating a lot of pepper. I would be afraid to eat Jalapenos and certainly Serranos in the quantity that I eat HHW. They are not mild by any means but they are just the right heat to give me both a lot of flavor and bulk with a bit of zing. Eating a HHW off the plant would not make me uncomfortable like I think a Jalapeno would.
Yes, I am a wimp. Jalapenos are "hot" IMO. But I do eat them in moderation.
Bruce

    Bookmark   December 6, 2013 at 10:15AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Hey, thanks, guys! The soup was delicious, but I do have a couple notes. My broth was thin, so I think cooking more peppers for longer would help. Also, add more salt than you think you'll need! I had to keep adding salt.

And just for good measure, these are the very last Hungarian Wax peppers (and yellow Monkey Face) that I harvested this year (2013). They weren't as prolific as in year's past, but they sure were big and tasty!

Love live the Hungarian Wax!

    Bookmark   December 7, 2013 at 6:36PM
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esox07 (4b)

Those are fake Josh. They are too pretty to be real. HHW are not supposed to be made out of real wax.


Bruce

    Bookmark   December 7, 2013 at 11:51PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Bruce, I have grown Jalapeno. They are not very tasty and the heat is just concentrated in the seeds membrane. Serrano has more heat but thin skinned. So, I am finding alternatives and they are:
-- Hungarian Wax
-- Manzano (10 -30k shu)
--- Fresno (similar heat as Jalap)

These are the peppers that I can eat and enjoy and get my dosage of Capsaicin without pain. I also do grow Habs, Koreans, Thai for sauce and powder.
My idea of growing peppers is to use them mostly as fresh vegetable NOT JUST for sauce and flavoring. That is why peppers like HW fits the bill.

    Bookmark   December 8, 2013 at 9:40AM
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esox07 (4b)

seysonn: Pretty much mirrors my thoughts on the HHW.
Bruce

    Bookmark   December 8, 2013 at 11:07AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Bruce, I can't believe how nice these last pods turned out.
Seriously, the waxy coating makes them so photogenic...it'll be tough to stuff and roast them!

Josh

    Bookmark   December 8, 2013 at 1:59PM
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