Grape Cuttings storage for Propagation

ottawan_z5aNovember 13, 2008

I will be receiving grapes cuttings in December. I am planning to be away for six weeks starting in January. My fidge is not reliable but I have a cold storage room where temperature stays around 44F~48F from December until the end of March. I was planning to fill up a big pot with commercial potting mix, just moist but not wet, insert the grape cuttings two inches apart in the pot with just one or two buds above the surfce. I am not planning any plastic dome over it because the dark cold room has some humidity and I am sure (from previous storage of dormant fig plants) that the pot will not require any watering during this period. Should I proceed with this idea or there are some pitfalls. Your input will be appreciated.

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yiorges-z5il

Emphis should be 1-2 buds BELOW the surface. # above not important.... Only potential problem will be a fungus forming on surface of soil But if the soil is steril or some ventalation then no problem.... go for it!

    Bookmark   November 14, 2008 at 5:15PM
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ottawan_z5a

yiorges
I had one cutting which was 10" long with 2 nodes but both nodes were 3" apart on the basal end. I buried the basal end and both nodes. Will shoot appear above the surface of rooting mix after rooting.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2008 at 10:39PM
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albert_135(Sunset 2 or 3)

Old textbooks, I'm talking 1960s, said store woody cuttings upside down. Folklore has it that this is the way grape cuttings were transported from Europe on sailing ships way back when.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2008 at 11:36AM
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ottawan_z5a

Actually storing upside down has another reason behind it. This technique is basically applicable to places with reasonably mild winter temperatures where the ground may not freeze solid like here in zone5 but the ground gets some warmth during the day from sunshine. The cuttings are buried in bundles upside down (with the basal end up i.e. the end that will be eventually down when planted) then covered with some thickness of soil. The top layers of the soil receive sunshine warmth during the winter and early spring period which causes the basal end to calluse over time during the winter. When the weather warms up later and it is time to plant, the callused cuttings are dug up and planted in their proper place with basal end down. This callusing helps expedite rooting. The upside down storing is simply to keep the basal end near the relatively warm top part of the soil.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2008 at 11:56AM
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shadowwalker(4)

If you have the room and can find one, pick up one of those cheap refridgerators that still work. You won't believe what all you will end up using it for.
I had one where I used to live and had all sorts of plant pieces,seeds in it.
Oh, it's good for a six pack or two.....of pepsi.

    Bookmark   December 15, 2008 at 4:29PM
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ottawan_z5a

yiorges
You wrote "Emphis should be 1-2 buds BELOW the surface. # above not important.... Only potential problem will be a fungus forming on surface of soil But if the soil is steril or some ventalation then no problem.... go for it!"

Now, I had received a cutting which was 10" long with only 2 nodes but both nodes were 3" apart at the basal end. I buried the basal end and both nodes. Will shoot appear above the rooting mix from one of the buruied nodes after rooting/shooting.

    Bookmark   December 17, 2008 at 1:35AM
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boizeau(7a)

A pile of raw sawdust works great. In the winter it is pretty inert and allows air circulation as well as keeping the wood from drying out.
A Refrigerator can dry out the wood, and can promote rot, due to cool temp fungus problems. Also, if you try to store cuttings with produce, the ethylene gas released will not be good for the grape wood.
Here in the PNW, outdoor temps are about perfect for leaving the cuttings in the ground, but we don't get subzero weather here.
Peat moss has a natural anti fungal char. and would be a good media to store cuttings in as well, if you loosen it up and get it 'slightly' damp first.
Would like to hear more about your grapes.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2008 at 2:14PM
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boizeau(7a)

Damp newspaper works good if there is no sawdust handy.
It is readily available too, and doesn't matter if it is out of date.

    Bookmark   December 21, 2008 at 8:32PM
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