'Blues Jam' Plum

conace55(z5 CO)May 7, 2010

I've wanted to get a plum tree for my yard for a few years now and finally decided on the Blue Damson. I want it primarily for jam making. However, I was too late to order this year and they were sold out. I decided that was the one I wanted and decided to wait until next year since I couldn't find a local supplier.

In my recent research, I've come across the "Blues Jam" plum which they compare to Blue Damson. Has anyone had any experience with this tree?

Connie

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david52_gw

I haven't heard of that one. Re Blue Damson, I've bought, in the last 10 years, 8 trees, grafted on root stock. There is one left, another died this spring. For some reason they just don't do well. OTOH, I have several other plum varieties that are going gang busters.

However, I was given a few clumps from the non-grafted shrubs that came over with the settlers, and they thrive. Something to look for - they often grow wild in the ditches around here.

And if you can find it, a clump of Green Gauge - that has to be the best plum for eating I've tried yet.

    Bookmark   May 7, 2010 at 9:07PM
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conace55(z5 CO)

Thanks David (I think lol). Now I'll have to re-think the Blue Damson. I was already annoyed that I'd be losing a year of growth by waiting for next year to plant. The big box stores have Stanley, and Tagawa has the Blues Jam, so I could get either of those in the ground immediately.

What are the plum varieties that you have that are doing well? (other than Green Gauge). I'm looking for a plum that's good for cooking/jam making rather than one that's good for eating off of the tree.

Connie

    Bookmark   May 7, 2010 at 10:15PM
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david52_gw

Well, for jam, I have Satsuma, which grows like a weed, and improved French Prune.

If it were me, I'd go ahead and plant the Blues Jam. My experiences with grafted Blue Damson may have more to do with my terrain and the irrigation practices of the people up the hill, and the way the water flows under the surface around here, drowning roots.

Following that riff on a rule of thumb that has yet to do anybody wrong - when is the best time to plant a fruit tree? Answer: ten years ago. :). I doubt you'll regret it.

Although its kind of a pain, we take a whole, 3 gallon stock pot of rinsed plums and simmer them until they're glop, let cool, and then use a food strainer to get out the seeds. The resulting jam can be canned as is, or sugar added. Last night, I took a pint of the sugar free, stirred in two teaspoons of corn starch, poured that into a store pie crust, and baked it.

Here is a link that might be useful: just to confuse things.....

    Bookmark   May 8, 2010 at 9:34AM
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conace55(z5 CO)

David, thanks for your experience. Your quicky pie sounds delightful! I'm going to have to do more research. When buying perennials I can make quicker decisions because not so much (time or money) is lost if it doesn't do well or I decide I don't like it.

But I really try to make good decisions for trees. I want them to be there for a really long time. And, of course, I want them to flourish. That's not asking too much is it? lol Thanks for the advice.

Connie

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 5:57PM
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