growing trinidad scorpion

chuckstoll(5)October 8, 2011

Any advise on growing trinidad scorpions?

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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

Grow them like you would any other pepper.
Proper soil, light, water, and nutrition.

Josh

    Bookmark   October 8, 2011 at 11:31AM
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chile_freak

lmao@josh

    Bookmark   October 9, 2011 at 1:49AM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

"Brevity is the soul of wit..."

A more precise question nets a more precise answer ;-)

Josh

    Bookmark   October 9, 2011 at 12:22PM
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chile_freak

shakespeare josh, well played!
as to the purpose of this thread, the only special instructions I can impart for trinidad scorpions, would be that for all C. chinense types Ive noticed they require more calcium than other varieties, otherwise they grow identically to other peppers, save for a few rare exceptions
paul

    Bookmark   October 9, 2011 at 11:06PM
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biscgolf

i treat them same as all the rest, just gotta get them in fairly early...

    Bookmark   October 10, 2011 at 1:46PM
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chuckstoll(5)

Sorry for not being specific, I was given the seeds and was tenative because I had a real problem with the Jolokia. I guess one of the main concerns I have is temperature. I have used a heat mat on serveral attempts to grow Jolokia and it seems like my plants get overheated or something, I dont seem to have a lot of luck with heat. How critical is heat?

    Bookmark   October 10, 2011 at 7:45PM
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Edymnion(7a)

Heat is important, but you have to keep it in a certain range. Below 70 is bad, but over 90 is bad too. Ideally you'd like to keep it at around 80.

I had the best germination with my bhuts last winter by putting them next to the heating vents and just keeping my heat set to a normal 68-70 degrees. The air that comes out is warmer than 70, heats up the moist soil (well, coco coir for me), which retains the heat better than air, so it stayed at just about the right temperature in the soil at all times.

I've also heard of people setting the seeds on top of indoor water heaters to similar effect.

Another option is to get an incandescent floodlight bulb and shine that on your mix, close enough for it to warm them without overheating.

When in doubt, stick a bowl of wet peat or coir in a spot for a few hours, then stick a regular medical thermometer in there and see what the temperature is.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2011 at 8:55PM
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scorpion_john(6)

if you have a heat mat use it, if they are getting too hot don't cover them. the domes are more trouble than they are worth. just keep them damp. kinda late to be starting seeds, I started mine in January. but I have found scorpions tend to overwinter and adapt to the lower light conditions indoors better than the other superhots

    Bookmark   July 15, 2013 at 10:26PM
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DMForcier(8 DFW)

What problems did you have with the jolokia?

    Bookmark   July 16, 2013 at 7:32PM
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