Roses that Burrito Wrap and Root Well

Kippy(SoCal zone 10. Sunset Zone 24)January 9, 2014

I thought I would start a series of topics for everyone to post their own experiences so we could have a data base to use when propagating.

Please add your experiences

Roses that burrito wrap well and root with winter burrito wrapping methods

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donaldvancouver(cool wet z8)

Hi- I don't have a ton of experience with burrito wrapping, but I do get the impression that success with the method is much more climate-dependent than cultivar-dependent. I have absolutely no trouble getting a hardwood cutting to callus in a burrito here; I would say at least 80% of the cuttings I have tried callused well in two weeks. But none of them rooted once removed from the burrito; they all rotted. Others have great success.

    Bookmark   January 10, 2014 at 10:51PM
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bethnorcal9

I just recently tried doing the burrito method with florist roses. The very first one calloused beautifully and got me inspired to do some every week. Well, after a couple of months, I've had really not much success with it. The first ones that calloused well didn't make it once they got potted up. But I didn't have them covered well enough and we got a cold snap and they just turned black. Subsequent batches have mostly either not calloused and just turned black, or slightly calloused and then died after being potted. So far, tho I do have a handful that are looking good. I put them all in clear plastic cups in a plastic container with clear plastic covering them and heating pads underneath, with wet clay pebbles under the pots. I have to mist them at least once a day. There are a few that have swollen budeyes and are not turning black.

I decided I'm dropping the burrito method for the florist roses tho, and going to just pot the stems up with the leaves on. That seems to work better. I may try some of my own garden roses in the burritos later to see if they work. But for now, I'd say... definitely florist roses do not do well!

    Bookmark   January 11, 2014 at 9:25AM
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seil zone 6b MI

I may be totally wrong but I think the burrito method works best on older hard wood and not green soft wood like a cut rose would be.

    Bookmark   January 11, 2014 at 7:40PM
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bethnorcal9

Yeah I'm sure you're right Seil. It's just that the very first one I tried calloused so well and so easily, I thought maybe it would work on others. WRONG. Oh well, it's all just experimental. Not a total loss tho. I just checked out there at the "incubator" and several of the ones that started to callous are hanging in there and swelling budeyes. So I may get a handful of them. It'll be a few weeks til I know if they truly did make it.

    Bookmark   January 11, 2014 at 7:50PM
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