Would like to try hybridizing this year ... suggestions needed.

kimichangirl(7b)April 2, 2011

Hello everyone! I am a lurker on these boards -- especially the main Rose forum -- but lately I find that my passion (or obsession, depending on your point of view) for roses has been growing. This year, I think I'd like to take a casual try at hybridizing roses -- just for the fun of it!

I thought I'd post to see if anyone has some suggestions for hybridizing with the very modest collection I currently have. Which of these roses might make good seed or pollen parents? I would love to try something with one of my two OGR's -- or perhaps even Darlow's Enigma ... Here's a list of what I have now:

Felicite Parmentier

Tuscany Superb

Darlow's Enigma

Rosa Rugosa Wild Spice

Colette (climber)

Scentsational

Julia Child

Cinco de Mayo

Living Easy

Iceberg (these are just potted bare root roses)

Mary Rose

Golden Celebration

What a Peach

R. Glauca

I also have on order through RVR for a few band-size roses, but I'm doubtful I could use them this year:

Madame Hardy

Ghislane de Feligonde

Souvenir de la Malmaison

Jerry Jennings (Paul Barden rose)**

**That last entry also brings up a question I have, and forgive me if this is a terribly "newbie" question ... but is it illegal to use patented roses for hybridizing? Even if it isn't, is there a "hybridizing etiquette" I should follow? Most of my lurking has been on the main Rose forum, but I think I may have read post from a rose hybridizer or two here (maybe even Paul Barden?) and I wouldn't want to start off on the wrong foot! :-)

Any and all suggestions, comments and words of advice are appreciated!

~Rebecca

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trospero(8)

"is it illegal to use patented roses for hybridizing? Even if it isn't, is there a "hybridizing etiquette" I should follow?"

No, it is not illegal to use patented roses for breeding. Patents do not in any way prohibit the use of a variety as breeding material, whether you are a pro or an amateur. There may come a day when genetically modified rose varieties might be prohibited from use as breeding material, as the genes themselves might be patentable, but that is of no concern to you right now, as your list is free of such varieties.

FYI most of the Albas are sterile, except the simplest ones like semi-plena, so you will find that neither 'Felicite Parmentier' nor 'Madame Hardy' (a Damask) will set viable seed. It is highly unlikely that either will provide viable pollen, as both have been tried and tried and yielded no offspring. Personally, I would avoid 'Scentsational' as a breeder, since it has a terrible problem with Blackspot and is likely to pass the problem on to offspring.

Many of the others you list are potentially viable parents and well worth exploring in a breeding program.

Regards, and best of luck,
Paul

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 11:01AM
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kimichangirl(7b)

Thank you Paul. That's too bad about 'Felicite Parmentier' and 'Madame Hardy' -- I had hoped to try one of those two roses, but I still have some good options. :-)

My goal this year is to simply complete all the steps successfully (including clearing out part of our garage for a mini-nursery, hahaha), so if I have anything to show for it next year, I will be happy.

After reading your post, I did a Google search on why some roses might be sterile and I wondered is it always the chromosome count which makes a particular rose sterile or are there other reasons (i.e., not many seeds produced)?

Also, with regard to chromosome counts, are there certain combinations that I should avoid?

I am still trying to find some good beginning and medium-depth information about hybridizing -- preferably in book format. I see on the web there is an organization called the Rose Hybridizers Association. I am going to email them and order their publications. Are there any other good sources of information you would suggest I look into?

Thanks once again for the information!

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 11:31PM
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trospero(8)

The RHAs beginner's book for hybridizers is THE single most useful publication you should start with. See also:

Here is a link that might be useful: Basic rose seed production, harvest, etc.

    Bookmark   April 4, 2011 at 1:25PM
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trospero(8)

The RHAs beginner's book for hybridizers is THE single most useful publication you should start with. See also:

Here is a link that might be useful: Basic rose seed production, harvest, etc.

    Bookmark   April 4, 2011 at 2:40PM
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roseseek

kimichangirl, another excellent guide would be to join the Premium membership ($25 a year) on Help Me Find. You can then look at everything listed as offspring for each of your roses, as well as take a look at everything listed as offspring for other roses you may find interesting. Not to replace any other source you are considering at all, but to supplement them. If there is a rose you are really interested in using, you can then search for any listed offspring from it and see what you think of the results. It will enable you to see photographs in many instances, of seedlings and commercial varieties bred from the roses in question. It helps a great deal. It's also very helpful to be able to determine what made the things you really like and see any trends in breeding which result in either desirable or even undesirable results. You can learn a GREAT deal just by browsing this informaiton.

When I began laying the foundation for my own exploration, I read all of the Modern Roses to trace ancestries and determine what had made results I found of interest and value toward my goals. Premium membership on HMF permits you to do all of that with a key stroke, saving tremendous time and expense. It's possible to spend several times the annual premium membership for the latest volume of Modern Roses and it won't contain any more information than you're likely to find on HMF. Believe me, if you have any real interest, join the RHA and HMF premium membership. They are your two best sources for information and at the most cost efficient rates! Kim

    Bookmark   April 5, 2011 at 4:03PM
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kimichangirl(7b)

Fabulous info -- I didn't know that HMF was such a handy resource. It will definitely come in handy as I am starting a spreadsheet of the roses I have with all of the information I can gather on them. I am sending off my membership application to the RHA today and am looking forward to receiving their beginner guides soon.

Thank you again!

    Bookmark   April 6, 2011 at 12:07PM
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