WANTED climbing roses to transplant

declipseMay 1, 2007

I have not raised roses in over 12 years, but I have missed them dearly. I have a new arbor and am wanting to plant climbing rosebushes on either side of it. I live in Macomb Township. About 45 minutes north of Detroit.

Is it possible to transplant rosebushes? Particularly because I do not want to wait until they grow as big as the arbor...I am hoping that someone may want to be rid of a couple that I could dig up and replant. It seems possible to root them? I never knew that...but I am hoping to plant now, vs. rooting, etc.

I have a clay soil where I know live. I'm not sure if I should plant directly into the clay. I have a garden book that suggest just putting a minimal amount of topsoil and allowing the rose to grow in the clay...but that just doesn't seem possible.

I am hoping for a red rose. It sounds like Rambling Red does well in this zone. New Dawn sounds like another good option for constant flowers. I also read about "awakening" which sounds similar to New Dawn but with a double bloom instead of a semi double bloom like the New Dawn. I'm also considereing planting clematis along with it to extend the color through the season. Is there any reason this would not be a good idea?

THANKS!

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mgleason56(Michigan 5b)

Doubtful you'll find any takers on digging up an established climber, especially here in Michigan. I doubt that even if you did that it would do that well being dug up and transported. Now, if you are willing to shell out about $50, I do know of a place selling potted, 3 year old climbers (Dublin Bay and Westerland for sure) in the Belleville area. I have a few roses, and really clay soil also. Just dig a hole twice as wide as the rootball and twice as deep, and amend the soil, but not with topsoil. Use a garden soil and the cheap manure/compost at Home Depot (probably closest to you is the M59 & M53 store).

One last item. We live in Michigan, so climbers have a tendency for dieback here. I get some dieback on most of mine, but by summer they are busting out with blooms. Do not get caught up on trying to find a huge one to start off with, and most importantly, DO NOT buy one from a place like Wiegands, etc unless you first find out here how it will survive our winters. Most of the climbers out there will fare pretty poorly.

Here is the link to the rose nursery in Belleville. It is the best in Michigan, and one of the best in the U.S.

You can email me, or post here with any other questions.

Here is a link that might be useful: Great lakes Roses

    Bookmark   May 1, 2007 at 11:29PM
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