How to propagate Cuttings with a potato

sunshine98(Z8 TX)July 14, 2006

I'm doing some cuttings now and I live in West Texas. It's my first time doing it this way but it seems to be working because I'm starting to see new buds on the cutting. I took the cuttings and bore a hole in a potato which started to have roots. The hole I bore on the potato was a bit smaller than the cutting so it is going to be a very snug fit which is good. Then I took the cutting and pushed it into the potato. They say you're supposed to use root hormone but I didn't to see if it works without it. Then you take the potato with the cutting and bury it in good potting soil so that only the potato is covered leaving the cutting exposed. Water well, and cover with a gallon milk jug with the bottom cut off to allow for air and to keep the humidity high near the cutting. "screw" the gallon unto the dirt. Your new cutting should be ready to dig up and plant in Spring. Good-luck!!!!

Sincerely and respectfully,

Nancy aka sunshine98

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joe_n_sc(7)

That is very interesting. Keep us posted on the results.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2006 at 2:50AM
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woodroid(z9Tejas)

You do know that you will be growing Potato plants with your roses don't you unless you peeled off all of the eyes. I used worm castings that I had from feeding worms in a worm bin leftovers once and ended up with a bunch of tomato plants along with the roses. Be careful what you wish for.

    Bookmark   July 18, 2006 at 9:19PM
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hoovb zone 9 sunset 23

Several people tried this over on the propagation forum a couple of years ago and ended up with rotted cuttings and rotted potatoes. I hope it works better for you.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2006 at 12:10PM
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wild_rose_of_texas(z8b TX)

Well, I for one am really curious to hear how this experient works out. Having lived in west Texas before, and knowing how hard it is to keep young plants well hydrated in the winds, I think there might be some merit to the potato method. I had heard of doing this slightly differently though:

The old method I have read of but never tried, instructs you to cut a wedge of potato (it didnt mention the eyes, but removing them sounds smart), and slice about halfway through it as if you were going to cut it up into chunks. Slip your rose cutting in to this slice, seating the rose cutting well into the potato body. Water it well, and plant it into a pot of good soil. Allow the soil to dry out between waterings, so the potato won't rot.

    Bookmark   July 26, 2006 at 5:18PM
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roseyp8255(z8 - SC AL)

did any of ya'll ever try it?

    Bookmark   September 14, 2013 at 10:19AM
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kittymoonbeam

My neighbor from Hungary said people had success using potatoes for starting roses back when his family lived there during WWII. They moved here after the war to escape the Russian soldiers. But he said it did work for them.

    Bookmark   September 30, 2013 at 9:12AM
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