do salvia's transplant well?

flyskyhigh40(z17 N.Ca)March 22, 2005

Wondering if salvia's tranplant well? I have several varieties growing well, but need to be moved as I am redoing this part of the garden. The thickness of the trunks are about 2-3 inches.

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CA Kate

I, personally, haven't had luck moving Salvias that large. I ended up taking cuttings from some and pulling-off side shoots from others, but the main plant didn't make it. Which doesn't mean yours won't... you just might want to back them up with cuttings, etc.

    Bookmark   March 22, 2005 at 10:43PM
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flyskyhigh40(z17 N.Ca)

When taking the cuttings, do I cut from the oldest wood, or the newer branches? Should I use root hormone to help the transplant along, or other fertilizer?

    Bookmark   March 23, 2005 at 12:38AM
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Mikey(SoCal-Z10-22/23)

I'm no expert but my experience to date indicates that most salvias can be propagated by means of cuttings But I have others that do better by layering wherein I bury the stem in the soil and anchor it with a U-shaped wire. I use rooting hormone when I take cuttings but I go lightly with it as sometimes it seems to damage the cutting, possibly burning it.

When taking cuttings, I select a firm green stem that can be snapped if bent sharply; not a stem with bark or a flimsy stem. Take a section about 6" long and cut it cleanly just below a leaf node. Use a light/airy damp potting mix in 4" plastic pots. I find they do better if kept damp, not moist or wet. Too much moisture seems to kill them. I don't take the time to coddle them by bagging them, but doing so would likely lead to more success. I keep them under shade cloth and after a few weeks I introduce them to more sunlight if they appear to be well rooted.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2005 at 2:26AM
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wanda(Z9 CA)

Many of my salvias have been transplanted (some several times) with no problems. I always cut the top part back by at least 1/3.
Salvias are in the mint family, so they're pretty tenacious for the most part, although some are less hardy than others.

Rooting tip cuttings is easy. Just nip off a 6" piece of new growth (not woody), dip in hormone, and plant in potting soil. If there are large leaves on your cuttings, then I would cut them in 1/2 horizontally. Don't put the cuttings in full sun for at least a week, and keep them moist.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2005 at 10:34AM
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flyskyhigh40(z17 N.Ca)

Thank you to all. I feel more confident now about the transplanting. Hope I can match your successes!!

    Bookmark   March 23, 2005 at 11:51AM
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jfr1107(ABQ z7 and denial)

I moved a 4' x 3' S. fulgens last spring without cutting any foliage back as sort of an experiment and out of pure laziness....;^)

I kept it well watered and it bounced back in a few weeks. I would not do it when it is really hot here, but during the cool months just about anything can be moved easily, without even cutting back.

The dryland salvia (e.g. CA natives) may be tricky to move and may resent transplanting, but I have never really tried.

Good Luck.

    Bookmark   March 27, 2005 at 3:32PM
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